Undergraduate Course Catalog
Effective Term
Requirement or Grouping
Listings Per Page
Subject
  or   Department
Show Descriptions Show Course Guide Term Links For Past Two Years
Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
   Page 1 of 1, Results 1 - 101 of 101   
Courses in LSA Afroamerican and African Studies

The Department of Afroamerican and African Studies (DAAS) provides students an opportunity to examine the histories, social organizations, cultures, and arts of people of African descent, particularly those of Africa, the United States, and the Caribbean. The department fosters a comprehensive program of study that enables students to focus within and across these areas, as well as to work within and across various disciplines, including history, literature, linguistics, anthropology, sociology, psychology, political science, economics, music, art, film, communications, and religion. While encouraging comparative analysis of the diverse cultural and social traditions derived from Africa, courses also bring attention to current theories, methodologies, and research on race, cultural identity, socioeconomic class, gender, and sexuality in relation to African, African American, and Afro-Caribbean experiences. In addition to exploring the historical cultures of Africa and its Diaspora, students also have opportunities to study contemporary issues treated in such professional fields as public policy, urban planning, education, environmental studies, information technology, and health sciences.

African Language Courses

The Department of Afroamerican and African Studies offers elementary and intermediate language instruction in the following languages: Akan, Bambara, Swahili, Wolof, and Zulu. Akan, Bambara, Wolof, and Zulu are offered under AAS 125, 126, 225, 226, Swahili is offered under AAS 115, 116, 117, 215, 216, 316.

Akan/Twi. Twi is a dialect of Akan, the principle language of Ghana. About 9 million people speak Twi, most of whom live in the Ashanti Region. Twi is also spoken in Cte d'Ivoire. The Ashanti people take great pride in their language, since it reflects not only their culture but also the history of their great nation.

Bambara/Bamana. Bambara, also known as Bamanankan, is part of the Manding language family. Bambara is one of the most widely spoken languages in West Africa and is used by more than 26 million people, primarily in Mali, but also in Burkina Faso, Gambia, Guinea-Conakry, Mauritania, Northern Cte d'Ivoire, and Senegal. Bambara is the lingua franca of many parts of West Africa and is used in some Malian schools, radio, and government offices.

Swahili. Swahili is spoken in Kenya, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Congo and the Comoros Islands. The sequence provides students with a solid knowledge of Swahili morphology and syntax, functional vocabulary, and practice in speaking and writing. It covers many facets of the East African cultures in which it is spoken. 

Wolof. Wolof is spoken by over 3 million people in Senegal and by millions of people in the Gambia, and Mauritania.  It is the lingua franca in Senegal and belongs to the Atlantic branch of the Niger-Congo language family.  Besides the Wolof people, the Wolof language is spoken by the Fulani, Serer, Toucouleur, Diola, and Mandingo people as a second language. There are opportunities for studying abroad.

Zulu/IsiZulu. IsiZulu, or Zulu, is spoken by about 10 million people in many parts of Africa. It is a Nguni language, related to IsiXhosa, IsiNdebele, and IsiSwati. A major language of South Africa, it is also the lingua franca of Zimbabwe, Malawi, Namibia, Mozambique, Swaziland, and Lesotho.

Course Credit

Many 400- and 500-level courses are elected by undergraduate and, often for less credit, by graduate students. The Undergraduate Course Catalogue lists credits earned by undergraduates.

Roster of CAAS Area and Cross-Area Courses:

  • African Studies Courses:
    200, 206, 208, 224, 246, 247, 260, 346, 355, 359, 362, 366, 368, 373, 385, 403, 407, 408, 409, 422, 427, 432, 436, 440, 453, 460, 462, 595
  • Afroamerican Studies Courses:
    201, 230, 231, 248, 254, 263, 268, 271, 274, 303, 323, 330, 333, 334, 336, 337, 338, 340, 341, 342, 344, 360, 361, 381, 383, 413, 417, 418, 450, 451, 454, 459, 463, 471, 476, 487, 489, 491, 519
  • Caribbean Studies Courses:
    202, 384, 444, 464, 473, 564
  • Cross-Area Courses:
    211, 304, 322, 328 (appropriate sections), 331, 348, 354 (appropriate sections), 365, 390 (appropriate sections), 394, 410, 411, 420, 421, 426, 495 (appropriate sections), 596 (appropriate sections)
Afroamerican & African Studies (AAS)
AAS 103. First Year Social Science Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a major.

This seminar introduces first-year students to the intellectual community of social scientists working in the field of Afroamerican and African studies. The topic of the seminar varies from year to year.

AAS 104. First Year Humanities Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). May not be included in a major.

This seminar introduces first-year students to the intellectual community of humanities scholars working in the field of Afroamerican and African studies. The topic of the seminar varies from year to year.

AAS 111. Introduction to Africa and Its Diaspora
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan. F.

Introduces basic concepts and methods involved in the study of Africa and its Diaspora. This team-taught course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach using maps, cultural artifacts, films, art, music, archival documents, literary texts, and key scholarly readings from both the humanities and social sciences. Prerequisite to the AAS concentration and minor.

AAS 115. Elementary Swahili
(4). May not be repeated for credit. Students with credit for AAS 115 may only elect AAS 117 for 4 credits.

This introductory-level course is designed for students with little or no previous study of Swahili (Kiswahili). Students develop their ability to communicate satisfactorily in Swahili in everyday practical situations as well as acquire some of the skills necessary for effective reading and writing. Using a variety of written and oral materials, the course focuses on the development of the four language skills necessary for interpersonal communication in Swahili: listening, writing, reading, and speaking.

AAS 116. Elementary Swahili II: Language and Culture
AAS 115. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAS 117.

This introductory-level course is designed for students who have successfully completed Swahili I or have permission of the instructor. Students continue to develop their ability to communicate satisfactorily in Swahili in everyday practical situations while acquiring the additional skills necessary for effective reading and writing. Using a variety of written and oral materials, the course focuses on the development of the four language skills necessary for interpersonal communication in Swahili: listening, writing, reading, and speaking.

AAS 200. Introduction to African Studies
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the history and cultures of Africa. The course surveys Africa's prehistoric past, the rise and development of early African states, and African achievements from the medieval period to the present. Throughout, attention is given to changing perspectives and approaches in the field of African Studies.

AAS 201. Introduction to Afro-American Studies
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview and introduction to the area of Afro-American Studies. Historical, political, sociocultural, and behavioral perspectives are brought to bear on the analysis of the Black American experience.

AAS 202. Introduction to Afro-Caribbean Studies
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An introductory course focusing on key issues in Afro-Caribbean studies. The specific topic is determined by the instructor.

AAS 203. Issues in Afro-American Development
AAS 111. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). Sp.

An interdisciplinary course concerned with issues currently critical to the development of the Black community along various dimensions, including the economic, political, social and educational aspects.

AAS 206. Issues in African Studies
AAS 111. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

AAS 208 / HISTART 208. Introduction to African Art
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This class investigates several pivotal issues and lie behind the surfaces of some extraordinary objects and practices of a selected group of African and African Diaspora cultures. Students learn how to see and understand a wide range of African visual practices. Topics include architecture, textiles, body adornment, painting, graphic communication systems, photography, dance, ritual performance and sculpture. Such practices continue to unfold on the African continent as people are transformed and endure in the African Diaspora.

AAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Examines issues related to the diverse experiences and representations of "Black" as a multicultural identity bearing broad national, regional, and international influences. The course explores the diversity of historical and contemporary cultural and artistic expressions within the U.S., the Caribbean, and across a range of global sites.

AAS 215. Intermediate Swahili I
AAS 116 or 117. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed for students who have completed the Elementary Swahili sequence or those with the permission of the instructor. It broadens speaking, reading and writing skills as students engage in discussions and writing on more complex topics.

AAS 216. Intermediate Swahili II
AAS 215. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed for students who have completed the Intermediate Swahili I sequence or with permission of the instructor. It broadens speaking, reading, and writing skills as students engage in discussions and writing on more complex topics.

AAS 224 / HISTART 224. African Visual Cultures: Akan/Kongo/Yoruba
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces a broad range of perspectives on African visual cultures by focusing on three cultural groups: the Akan, the Yoruba and the Kongo. Lecture and discussion topics are thematic and cross-cultural, examining the visual image in contexts before, during, and after European colonialism as well as in Diasporic transformations.

AAS 225. Intermediate African Languages I
AAS 126 or permission of instructor based on proficiency in elementary language skills. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not repeat the same language at the same level.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read and write a sub-Saharan African language at the Intermediate level.

AAS 226. Intermediate African Languages II
AAS 225 (or CAAS 225). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. May not repeat the same language at the same level. May not repeat the same language at the same level.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read and write a sub-Saharan African language at the Intermediate level.

AAS 231 / HISTORY 275. Survey of Afro-American History, II
AAS 111. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 246 / HISTORY 246. Africa to 1850
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The course is an introduction to the peoples and cultures of Sub-Saharan Africa. It begins with a survey of the origins of man and early African civilizations and concludes with the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.

AAS 247 / HISTORY 247. Modern Africa
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This is the second part of a two-course introduction to central themes in Sub-Saharan African history. It deals with the abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism, underdevelopment, nationalism, and decolonization.

AAS 248. Crime, Race, and the Law
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on both the historical origins, and the ongoing impact, of the racial crisis in the present-day American criminal justice system and its momentous public policy implications for U.S. society in the 21st century.

AAS 254. The History and Evolution of Hip Hop Culture
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the rise of Hip Hop as a global phenomenon and the social controversies that it has engendered. Drawing on documentaries, films, and music, we address issues of violence, misogyny, use of the "b-work" and "n-word," and glorification of "ghetto culture" in exploring Hip Hop's eveolution.

AAS 260. The Political Economy of African Development
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The course introduces students to the confluence of political and economic forces at the local, national, regional and global levels that have helped shape the trajectory of African development. The course in divided into two parts: the first examines the meaning and evolution of the political economy of development in the context of Africa's unfolding history, while the second applies an understanding of political economy to topical development issues and case studies.

AAS 262 / HISTORY 272. The Modern Civil Rights Movement
(4; 3 in the half-term). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course traces the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from its origins in the early 20th century through the 1960's and beyond. It focuses on the organizations that emerged to press for racial equality and the strategies they pursued to achieve their goals, from litigation and legislation to mass protest, economic self-help and racial separatism. Finally, the course examines debates over the role of race in public policy in the post-civil rights-era.

AAS 263. Race, Housing, and Employment
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Why are neighborhoods and workplaces still segregated 48 years after passage of the Civil Rights Act? This course examines how racial politics shape housing market and labor market outcomes. Through discussion, empirical research, and written assignments, we'll investigate the courses of racial inequality and the consequences of racial isolation.

AAS 268. Community Collaborations: Race, Social Justice, and Engaged Learning
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores community engaged learning through theoretical, historical, and practical lenses. You'll learn to critically analyze structural inequalities; reflect on your identities and experiences in exploring issues of power, privilege, and social change; develop practical skills for interviewing and collaborating; and explore possibilities for future engagement with community members.

AAS 271 / ENGLISH 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature
AAS 111 (CAAS 111). (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys poetry, fictive and autobiographical narratives, prose essays, and drama produced by black writers over the course of their presence in America. The goal is to investigate responses to Afro-American peoples' situation in a society simultaneously both hostile to and keenly dependent upon their presence.

AAS 273 / AMCULT 273. The Southern Novel in Historical Context
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Focusing on five classic southern novels, this course will examine how history and literature can illuminate each other, particularly in matters of race and race relations. Readings will include works by Harper Lee, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Dames Dickey, and Alice Walker, while in-class lectures will address Southern literary history and the history of the South during the turbulent decades of the 1930s through the 1970s. We will also focus on the authors' lives and the ways in which they created works of lasting significance out of the raw materials of their experiences.

AAS 290. Selected Topics in Black World Studies
(2). May not be repeated for credit.

A mini-course seminar on specialized topics in Afroamerican, African, and/or Caribbean studies.

AAS 303 / SOC 303. Race and Ethnic Relations
An introductory course in Sociology or AAS 201. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

This course examines the tensions underlying American race and ethnic relations. Students use theoretical debates, historical, social and political meanings of race and ethnicity, and the study of how various racial and ethnic groups construct and use their social identities to examine the processes that facilitate or impede intergroup relations.

AAS 304 / WOMENSTD 304. Gender and Immigration: Identity, Race, and Place
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines crucial questions related to how mobility, border-crossing, dislocation, and displacement are gendered and are given cultural and political meanings in the era of globalization and transnationalism. We carefully examine the embedded meanings and histories of the terms, "diasporas," "transnationalism," and "globalization," and their usefulness in analyzing social constructions of gendered-identities, race, caste, and ethnicity, and reproduction, socialization, and health.

AAS 305 / HISTORY 305 / LACS 305. Histories of the Modern Caribbean
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Situated at the historical crossroads of Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The course will focus on the Greater Antilles -- Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba -- we will explore world historical themes in this region from the Haitian revolution to the present.

AAS 316. Advanced Swahili II
AAS 315. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course assumes higher proficiency in the written and spoken. It enables students to gain a deeper understanding of the language through reading, analyzing and interpreting complex thoughts, issues and ideas in literature written in Kiswahili by African writers.

AAS 322 / ENVIRON 335. Introduction to Environment Politics: Race, Class, and Gender
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses).

This course analyzes the development of political action from the 1860s to the present. It will analyze the role of race, gender, and class in defining environmental issues and environmental action.

AAS 323 / HISTORY 388 / WOMENSTD 323. Black Feminist Thought and Practice
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the production and practice of black feminist theory in 20th century America. It examines the written work and the activism of African American women and looks at the ways their theory and practice historically intersect around questions of race, class, sexuality, nationality and gender. Using both primary and secondary sources, the course is also concerned with the various articulations of black feminism (e.g. womanism, critical race feminism, transnational black feminism, hip hop feminism, etc.).

AAS 324. Dealing with the Past and Doing Justice in Africa: South Africa, Rwanda, Sierra Leone
AAS 111 and AAS 200, prior coursework in comparative politics, international relations, or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on three transitional societies in Africa emerging from national nightmares and confronting their past: South Africa, Rwanda and Sierra Leone. Considering the political realities in each country, this course explores the opportunities and limitations of the different forums, and the dilemmas they present for enforcement, sovereignty, and justice. The course finally looks at the structure and functions of the controversial International Criminal Court and its potential to be an instrument for ensuring global accountability for the most serious crimes.

AAS 328 / WOMENSTD 328. Women, Agency and Sexual Safety
One course in WOMENSTD or AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course takes a transnational perspective on the purpose, development, and utilization of different kinds of reproductive technologies. Feminist critiques and analyses of the role of reproductive technologies in Africa, U.S., and global contexts are central to the course.

AAS 330 / RCSSCI 330. Urban and Community Studies I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

An interdisciplinary course using faculty and community resources to provide a broad exposure to urban settings and the forces at work within them.

AAS 331 / PSYCH 316. The World of the Black Child
One course in Psychology or Afro-American and African Studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses).

AAS 333. Perspectives in Afro-American History
AAS 201. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). Sp.

A seminar-like course emphasizing a theoretical approach to Black historical inquiry. An attempt is made to group the meaning and implications of various developments in Black history.

AAS 334 / AMCULT 336. Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America
AAS 201. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

In this course, students will explore the role of African Americans in U.S. popular culture from the 1830s to the present, from the representations of Blacks in Black face minstrelsy to the ways by which African Americans have adopted, adapted and confronted the legacies of racism.

AAS 336 / HISTORY 336 / WOMENSTD 336. Black Women in the United States, Part I: From the American Revolution through the Women's Era
AAS 201 (CAAS 201). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history of African-American women from the American Revolution through the passage of the nineteenth amendment in 1920. Through the secondary work of historians and readings of primary sources, students will examine a variety of topics including work, the family, the construction of race and gender, politics, the law and sexuality. The course will also consider the various ways in which historians have theorized about black women's pasts and ask how those theories may help to inform our approaches to the telling of history.

AAS 337 / HISTORY 337 / WOMENSTD 337. Black Women in the U.S., Part II: Contemporary Perspective in the 20th and 21st Centuries
AAS 201 (CAAS 201). (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. AAS 336.

This course examines the history of black women in the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. The course investigates black women's participation in, and influence on, post-World War II social and political movements as well as the impact of these struggles on black women's day-to-day lives, status, and politics. Centering black women's experiences as local organizers and political leaders, the course explores significant events, organizations, and political debates that helped to form and transform the civil rights, black power, and women's movements.

AAS 338 / ENGLISH 379. Literature in Afro-American Culture
AAS 201. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 340 / AMCULT 340. A History of Blacks in American Film
AAS 201. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). Sp.

AAS 341 / THTREMUS 222. Introduction to Black Theatre
AAS 201. (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 342 / THTREMUS 233. Acting and the Black Experience
Permission of instructor (brief interview). AAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 346 / ENGLISH 389 / HISTORY 362. Literature in African History
AAS 111 and 200. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the intersection of African history and literature, of imagination and politics. We study how African writers participated in the political and moral arguments of their time. In epic dramas, in novels, in poetry and in autobiographies, African composers conjured up audiences, offered a shared vision of the past and the future, and set them on a forward path together.

AAS 354 / HONORS 354 / RCHUMS 354 / WOMENSTD 354. Race and Identity in Music
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the parameters of racial and ethnic identities in music; primarily but not exclusively in Western art music (commonly known as "classical music"). The focus is on understanding how racial and ethnic differences can be portrayed musically. Case studies are drawn from the late eighteenth century through the present with a strong emphasis on the nineteenth century and opera.

AAS 355 / ANTHRCUL 355 / HISTORY 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds
(4; 3 in the half-term). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

Changes in disease, epidemiology, and health and healing practices in African continental and Atlantic worlds from the fifteenth century, as Africans encountered new forms of medicine, slavery, colonialism, epidemic, famine, and war. Designed for concentrators in History and Afroamerican and African Studies and/or students seeking careers in medicine, public health, and medical anthropology.

AAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

AAS 359 / POLSCI 359. African Politics
AAS 200. (3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

A comparative survey of the African states and territories, with primary emphasis on the process of decolonization, the continued dependent status of African states, obstacles to change, and alternative strategies of development.

AAS 360. Afro-American Art
AAS 201. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). F.

AAS 361. Comparative Black Art
AAS 360. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). W.

AAS 362 / HISTART 362. Expressive Cultures of the Black Atlantic: Vision and Time
HISTART 208/AAS 208 and upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course addresses a diversity of Black Atlantic visual cultures, both in Africa and in the Diaspora, with a focus on how historical memory and the experience of the passage of time are articulated in objects and performances.

AAS 365 / WOMENSTD 365. Global Perspectives on Gender, Health, and Reproduction
One course in either Women's Studies or AAS. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Examines constructions and meanings of gender, health, reproduction and social difference. By using various cross-cultural examples, we discuss how gender, racial, and class differences are enacted and manifested in the divisions of social spaces, and in bodily conduct, function, hygiene, and sickness.

AAS 366. Music of Africa
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to African musical traditions through an investigation of the aural styles, creative processes and social contexts of music making in a variety of African nations and cultures.

AAS 368. Conservation & Development in Cultural Landscapes: Fieldwork in Kenya
(4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Through classwork and field study, this course explores the processes associated with conservation and development initiatives. We study natural science concepts (e.g. materiality of nature, conservation boundaries, wildlife and livestock ecology, land cover change) and social science concepts (e.g. commoditization of nature, natures agency, social constructionism, livelihood systems, conservation strategies).

AAS 373. Other Africans: The Cultures of Portuguese-Speaking Africa
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the cultures of Portuguese-speaking Africa: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, and Sao Tome & Principe. Students learn about colonialism and post-independence; Pan-Africanism and Negritude; wars of liberation and Third World Marxism; national identity formations; gender politics; the travails of democratization and modernization; and nation re-building and peace-making in Lusophone Africa.

AAS 381 / ENGLISH 380 / WOMENSTD 381. Intersections: Fictions and Feminisms of the African Diaspora
AAS 111 (CAAS 111). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Focusing on fiction written by women in the African Diaspora, this course explores how works of fiction can contribute to an understanding of feminisms, and how various feminist perspectives can contribute to an understanding of fictional texts.

AAS 384 / AMCULT 406 / ENGLISH 384. Caribbean Literature
AAS 202. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

The course considers a range of topics in the study of Caribbean literature. It raises questions concerning the canon of texts to be studied, the cultural construction of Caribbean literature, race and ethnicity.

AAS 385 / ENGLISH 385. African Literature
AAS 200. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. (African Studies).

This course considers a range of topics in the study of African literature. It raises questions concerning the canon of texts studied, the cultural construction of African literature, race and ethnicity.

AAS 390 / WOMENSTD 390. Homophobia in the Black World
One course in WOMENSTD or AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the presentation and meaning of homosexuality and homophobia in communities of color in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Africa. The cultural presentation and consequences of homophobia and discrimination vary greatly depending on the location. Therefore, an emphasis is placed on understanding different social constructions of homosexuality and how these views are complicated by geographical region.

AAS 394. Junior Seminar in Professional Writing
Upperclass standing. (4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. (Cross-Area Courses).

This seminar provides students with opportunities to read, analyze, and practice a diverse range of professional writing styles based on a theme chosen by the students and instructor. Writing formats may include journalism, creative writing, grant proposals, legal writing, public scholarship, and writing related to the fields of science and health.

AAS 403. Education and Development in Africa
AAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

AAS 407 / HISTART 406. Looking at African Things
HISTART 208/AAS 208. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the shifting historical terms and narratives that constitute and justify the creation, display and reception of African object, both in and out of Africa, in such contexts as museums, photographic archives, world's fairs, theme parks and other cultural spectacles.

AAS 408. African Economies: Social and Political Settings
AAS 200. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

AAS 409 / ANTHRCUL 408. Maternal/Child Health and Environmental Pollution in Africa
Junior or above. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on the effects of the environment and environmental pollution on the health of women and children in several sub-Saharan African countries. Selected readings in medical anthropological, public health, and environmental pollution as well as films examining connections between health, environmental factors, culture, and development are examined.

AAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (AAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections. (Cross-Area Courses). F, W, Sp, Su.

AAS 417. Studying African Americans: An Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
AAS 111 or AAS 201. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This writing-intensive seminar provides an introduction to the major methodological developments in qualitative research, while specifically offering training in naturalistic data collection methods and research report writing. Considerable attention is given to inter- and cross-cultural strategies for engaging in fieldwork and presenting research (written and orally) that centers on African Americans and the cultural trope of Blackness.

AAS 418 / POLSCI 324. Black Americans and the Political System
One course in Political Science and AAS 201. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

This course focuses on the status of Blacks in the American political system. Students analyzes the capacity and the capability of the political system for negotiating internal conflicts involving Black/White relationships.

AAS 420 / ANTHRCUL 347. Race and Ethnicity
Junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

A comparative analysis of race and ethnicity as social and political phenomena with emphasis on the current theoretical literature; criteria by which different peoples classify races and/or ethnic groups; the implications of those classifications for inter-group relations and the of how attitude and values surrounding race and ethnicity have shaped contemporary world events.

AAS 421 / HISTORY 421 / LACS 421 / RELIGION 421. Religions of the African Diaspora
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Conceptualizes "diaspora" and introduces Brazilian Candomble, Cuban Santeria and Palo Monte, Haitian Vodou, Jamaican and globalized Rastafari, the ancestor religion of the Garifuna of Central America, and Afro-Indian practices in Trinidad. Studies of historical development as well as contemporary practice will be used.

AAS 422 / ANTHRCUL 411. African Cultures
AAS 200 (CAAS 200); and junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. The course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa.

AAS 426. Urban Redevelopment and Social Justice
(3). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). F.

AAS 432. Violent Environments: Oil, Development and the Discourse of Power
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine and compare discourses and practices concerned with resource extraction, resource distribution, energy security, and "modernity" in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America. In particular, we'll explore how oil exploration in postcolonial states has created spaces of violence and possibilities for development, and has continually reshaped the idea of what constitutes the nation.

AAS 434 / SOC 434. Social Organization of Black Communities
Introduction to SOC or introduction to AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 436. Witchcraft and Spiritual Insecurity in Africa
AAS 111 (CAAS 111) or AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

"Witchcraft" is ubiquitous in Africa. Vast amounts of time, money, and energy are expended in countering evil forces spoken of as witchcraft. In recent decades, scholars of Africa from all disciplines and continents (including Africa) have come to realize that issues relating to witchcraft have to be considered in the study of African life. But witchcraft, along with the broader condition of spiritual insecurity of which it is part, is not easily understood, especially for outsiders. Most social science disciplines are unable to integrate analysis of spiritual insecurity into their methods. The objective of this course is to explore ways of thinking about spiritual insecurity and methods for studying its relation to central aspects of African life.

AAS 440 / SAC 440. African Cinema
AAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

A critical and interdisciplinary look at the development of African cinema from its inception in the 1960s, at the height of the sociopolitical upheavals experienced by many nations in the transition from colonialism to independence, to the recent phase of introspection and diversification.

AAS 443 / WOMENSTD 443. Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health
AAS 201, WOMENSTD 240 or 220, AMCULT 240, NURS 220. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore the intersections of health, gender, and race by focusing on the epidemic of HIV and the epidemic of violence in the African American community. Students will explore the theory and practice surrounding an intervention module on HIV prevention and violence.

AAS 444 / ANTHRCUL 414. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
Junior standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Afro-Caribbean Studies). F.

A survey of the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean with emphasis on Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Guyana. Analysis of class, race relations, cultural pluralism, ethnicity, population movements, and economic development.

AAS 450. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, I
(3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). F.

AAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II
AAS 450. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). W.

This course is a continuation of Law, Race and the Historical Process I (AAS 450). It covers the period of time from the beginnings of the modern Civil Rights movement to the present.

AAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453. African-American Culture
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

AAS 459 / ANTHRCUL 451. African-American Religion
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 462. Globalization and African Health
AAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The course will investigate the two-way relationship between globalization and African health. Topics include: globalization and informalization; urbanization and health; the influence of international property rights and access to pharmaceuticals; the impact of international trade on African incomes; the relationship between international debt, World Bank and IMF conditionally and the health of Africans; the impact of FDI on African livelihoods; the influence of commodity chains and global industries on Africa's standard of living; how the shifting global climate has affected rainfall patterns; agricultural production and the incidence of malnutrition and famine; and the relationship between the health of Africans and new global diseases.

AAS 463. The Black Middle Class in America
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course provides a broad overview of the emergence, growth, and stability of the black middle class. It is concerned with much-debated issues such as: (1) the criteria used to determine membership in the category of middle class; (2) how class position shapes opportunity; (3) whether there is a viable black middle class culture; and (4) how members of the black middle class assess their experience.

AAS 464 / MUSICOL 464. Music of Latin America and the Caribbean
AAS 202. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Afro-Caribbean Studies).

AAS 468. Practicum in Field Studies in the Diaspora
AAS 111 or permission of instructor. May require concurrent registration in AAS 469, Issues in the Diaspora. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Exposing students to the culture and politics of regions in the African Diaspora through experiential educational methodologies. This course provides instruction and practical experience in public health, architecture, ethnomusicology, and/or other disciplines under the supervision of a faculty member. Includes completion of journals or field notes, projects and presentations as required by instructor.

AAS 469. Issues in Field Studies in the Diaspora
AAS 111 or permission of instructor. May require concurrent registration in AAS 468, Field Studies in the Diaspora. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Exposes students to the culture and politics of regions in the African diaspora through on-side seminars and lectures by scholars and other professionals from the host country. Readings and on-side papers address the methodological, theoretical and historical foundations of field work, and deepen student's understanding of "race" across the diaspora.

AAS 471. Higher Education and African-American Social Development
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an empirically informed overview and analytical engagement of the various factors central to understanding the role higher education has played in the social development of the African-American population in the United States. Historically most African Americans have understood that access to higher education (i.e., colleges and universities) can have a fundamental impact on their future life opportunities within the American social structure.

AAS 473 / HISTORY 473 / LACS 483. Brazil: History and Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the history of Brazil, focusing on literature and performance as expressions of the national or regional cultural identities, with particular attention to racial categories and African heritage. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and paternalism; religious expression; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression, incorporating interdisciplinary sources such as fiction, archival documents, testimony, ethnography, recorded music, and dance/movement.

AAS 474 / ACABS 474. The Archaeology of Nubia
ACABS 281, ACABS 382, AAS 200, or ANTHRARC 282. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course presents the archaeology and history of one of Africa's earliest civilizations, Nubia, which is located along the Nile in what is today southern Egypt and northern Sudan. It summarizes developments in Nubian history from the expansion of the Sahara desert and the first human settlement in the Nile Valley and concluding with the fall of Meroe in about AD 300. Topics include rise of states and empires, colonialism, identities, international trade, and the relationship of climate change to social development. The course concludes with discussions of modern politics of cultural heritage and museums in the Middle East and Africa.

AAS 480 / HISTART 408. Visual Culture as History in Africa
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Employing the analytical and interpretive methods of art history, archaeology, and history, this course examines artifacts and architecture from a number of African societies as historical "documents" of the past, and also as agents of social, political, religious, and economic processes that were used to shape the histories of these societies.

AAS 487. Communication Media in the Black World: Electronic Media
AAS 201. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies
(1 - 2). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

The mini-course is part of a series that explores race.

AAS 495. Senior Seminar
Upperclass standing. (4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. (Cross-Area Courses). (Capstone Course).

An intensive seminar on specialized topics in Afroamerican, African, and/or Caribbean Studies.

AAS 497 / POLSCI 458. Party Politics and Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the transition from one party to multi-party democracies in Africa, the growth of political parties, and prospects for the institutionalization of democracy across the continent. The course explores the extensive literature in comparative politics on parties and party systems, and its content is theoretical and empirical.

AAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

AAS 595 / HISTORY 595. Topics in African History
CAAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of topics in African history.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2012 Regents of the University of Michigan