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Courses in LSA American Culture

The Department of American Culture exposes students to the interdisciplinary study of U.S. society and culture. Our courses integrate a rich array of materials, themes, and approaches from many fields: not only historical and literary study, but also visual studies, musicology, film and media, anthropology, and others. The curriculum of the Department emphasizes the multicultural diversity of American society, paying particular attention to ethnic, gender, and other forms of social difference and inequality. At the same time, it stresses the importance of studying U.S. nationhood, including Americans’ (sometimes conflicting) ideals and experiences of what it means to be American. Our courses are designed to explore these issues in both historical and contemporary settings.

Gateway courses

The Program has a broad array of 200-level courses through which students may get an initial exposure to American studies. These “gateway courses” include introductions to ethnic studies, topical seminars, “periods” courses on particular eras, and AMCULT 201 (American Values). Gateway courses are not primarily surveys, but discussion-based “modes of thought” courses that model various themes and approaches to interdisciplinary American studies.

Repetions

Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwe

A full sequence of Ojibwe cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture main office before undertaking Ojibwe to satisfy the College language requirement. Students interested in enrolling in the first-year elementary Ojibwe course, AMCULT 222, must submit an application for admission to the course. Applications are available in the Department of American Culture office, 3700 Haven Hall.

American Culture (AMCULT)

AMCULT 222 and 223 will not be offered in 2013-14

AMCULT 100. What is an American?
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course challenges students to rethink their understanding of American citizenship through important readings on race, class, ethnicity, immigration, gender, sexuality, liberty and equality.

AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of topics and issues in American Studies in a seminar format from a Social Science perspective. It will enable students to have contact with regular faculty in a small-class experience and to elicit their active participation in the topics under discussion.

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to introduce students to a wide variety of topics and issues in American Studies in a seminar format from a Humanities perspective. It will enable students to have contact with regular faculty in a small-class experience and to elicit their active participation in the topics under discussion.

AMCULT 201. American Values
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

AMCULT 202. Digital Culture
(4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores how digital technologies and practices have shaped contemporary culture and cultural production, focusing on the relationships of power through the lens of race, class, gender, and sexuality.

AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is intended for first year students, sophomores and juniors as specific illustrations of the issues raised and the approaches used by American Studies scholars. It is an interdisciplinary approach to a social, cultural, or literary theme in American Culture.

AMCULT 205. American Cultures
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Topics and approaches of American Studies scholars.

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is intended for first year students, sophomores, and juniors as specific illustrations of the issues raised and the approaches used by American Studies scholars. It will complement AC 204 but will have a social science focus.

AMCULT 207. Periods in American Culture
(3). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is intended for first year students, sophomores, and juniors as a specific illustrations of the issues raised and the approaches used for scholars in American Studies. An interdisciplinary approach to a well-defined period in America's past will shape the content which will carry a social science orientation.

AMCULT 208. Post World War II American Sub-Cultural Movements: Beatniks, Hippies, and Punks
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course looks at the beatnik, hippie, and punk movements in America to introduce the concepts of sub- and counter -cultures, issues of cultural diversity, and the function of such groups as folk cultures. By tracing the history of each group the course investigates how these twentieth-century American secondary cultures responded to the traditional, or dominant, culture. We also consider how each group, despite radical appearances, drew upon a host of traditional cultural tools and processes to create their own communities.

AMCULT 209. History of American Popular Music
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

America has never been without popular music, a form that expresses our deepest collective desires and our most transparent sentiments. This course traces the history of American Popular Music from its earliest days through contemporary genres. Students listen to, watch, and analyze popular music in and from its context, styles, and forms.

AMCULT 211. Introduction to Ethnic Studies
(3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

AMCULT 213 / LATINOAM 213. Introduction to Latina/o Studies
(3 - 4). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

An interdisciplinary overview of the historical experiences, contemporary community issues, and cultural and artistic expressions of Latina/os in the United States.

AMCULT 214 / ASIANPAM 214. Introduction to Asian/Pacific American Studies
(3). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

An overview of the historical experiences, contemporary community issues, and cultural and artistic expressions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Americans in the U.S.

AMCULT 215 / AAPTIS 210 / ARABAM 215. Introduction to Arab-American Studies
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introductory survey to Arab-American studies.

AMCULT 217 / NATIVEAM 217. Introduction to Native American Studies
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will give students an overview of many aspects of Native-American culture, including Pre-Columbian lifestyles and gender roles, religion, literature, Native-American identity, attempts and resistance to forced assimilation, and struggles for sovereignty. Themes of colonialism and its impact on Native Americans are featured throughout. The course emphasizes the diversity of Native-American communities, and seeks to broaden students' understanding of Native Americans beyond the image of Plains Indians on horseback. As the course name implies, the topics will be covered in a way that emphasizes breadth, rather than depth, whetting students' appetite for the advanced courses in these areas offered through the Program in American Culture.

AMCULT 218. Interdisciplinary Introduction to Ethnic Studies
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

The objective of the course is to introduce students to a variety of ways to approach the study of race by inviting speakers from different disciplines, for example, anthropology, biology, communication studies, public policy, history, economics, sociology, psychology, ethnic studies, etc.

AMCULT 219. Survey of American Folklore
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the unofficial culture of the American experience, with emphasis on oral literature, beliefs, and lifeways. Special sections deal with folk music, dance, and material culture. This course helps us understand what it is to be American and how we define this through our traditions and beliefs.

AMCULT 223 / NATIVEAM 223. Elementary Ojibwe II
AMCULT 222 with a minimum grade of C-. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an academic minor in Native American Studies. W.

AMCULT 224 / LATINOAM 224 / SPANISH 278. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners
Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 290. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Addresses the linguistic needs of any student who has spoken Spanish at home or as part of his/her cultural heritage or upbringing. Spanish grammar, vocabulary building, reading and writing skills are developed along with discussions on bilingualism and biculturalism.

AMCULT 226 / HISTORY 226 / LATINOAM 226. The Latin Tinge: Latin Music in Social Context in Latin America and the U.S.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces key Latin musical styles, recordings, and musicians. It requires extensive listening and musical analysis, and develops these historical themes: 1) the origins and development of Afro-diasporic musical styles: 2) the interplay between nationalism and popular music: and 3) international musical flows shaped by Atlantic colonialism, commercial markets, and labor migration.

AMCULT 228 / ASIANPAM 228. American Musical Soundscapes
Not available to students who have completed AMCULT 204, Topic: Musical Soundscapes. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of musical life in the United States, in the contexts of cultural citizenship and digital literacy. We examine interrelationships between 'soundscapes" - the sonic dimensions of our environment, and "soundtracks" - musical experiences that we create for ourselves, or are created for public consumption.

AMCULT 230 / HISTART 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture/discussion class surveys painting, sculpture, architecture, and the visual and material culture of everyday life. It examines the impact of industrialization, Westward expansion, international art movements, and the rise of middle-class taste. Assignments include museum visits, readings in historical sources and recent critical interpretations, and original research.

AMCULT 231. Visual & Material Culture Studies
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The purpose of this course is to establish a vocabulary and methods for scholarly work in Visual Culture and Material Culture. Students will be asked to interrogate the meanings in and uses of photography, public art, advertising, illustration, architecture, industrial design, film, etc... as these fundamental elements of the visual terrain of the United States construct and convey ideas about "America" and "Americanness."

AMCULT 232 / NATIVEAM 232. Native American Literature
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the history of Native American writing and oratory in the English language from the late eighteenth century to the present. Texts are situated to their historical, cultural, and political contexts, so this course also serves as a basic introduction to American Indian history, policy and law.

AMCULT 235 / ARABAM 235 / WOMENSTD 235. From Harems to Terrorists: Representing the Middle East in Hollywood Cinema
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

An overview of representations of Arabs and Arab-Americans in Hollywood cinema over the last century. Course traces a shift in stereotypes from the rich Arab sheik with a harem to the Arab terrorist, examining the connection between representations and the historical-political moment in which they are created, from European colonialism to 9/11.

AMCULT 236 / ARABAM 236. Muslims in America
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the realities and experiences of Muslims in America, beginning with the trans-Atlantic slave trade and into the contemporary post-911 socio-political situation. We study and explore multi-faceted issues relating to various Muslim American communities, including women, immigrants, African-American indigenous Muslims, and transnationals. We also consider the status of Muslim-Americans' civil rights and their many responses to political racism, particularly but not exclusively in the aftermath of September 11th, 2001.

AMCULT 237 / HISTART 237 / RCHUMS 237. On the Margins of the Art World - Self-Taught Artists in the U.S.
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys a broad range of artists variously known as "Outsider", "Self-Taught", or "Folk" artists. In addition to exploring these artists' work, this course explores boundaries between Fine Art and other creative practices, and explores broader issues regarding creativity, marginality, art, and culture.

AMCULT 239 / WOMENSTD 239. Gender, Sexuality, and Health in America
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores gender, sexuality, and health in America over time and in terms of contemporary issues and controversies.

AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

AMCULT 242 / WOMENSTD 242. Gender Violence in a Global Context
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Students will study various human rights debates related to racial, sexist, and homophobic violence on a global scale. Course themes include: human trafficking; law enforcement and criminal justice-based violence; armed conflict and war; medicalized violence; and socio-economic violence. Students will learn to apply course material to their analysis of and involvement in the world around us. Course materials draw upon several disciplines ranging from anthropology and sociology to cultural studies, literature, and film and incorporate scholarly studies as well as policy, advocacy, and community-based based publications and reports.

AMCULT 243 / LATINOAM 243 / WOMENSTD 243. Latina Women in the U.S.
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will serve to introduce the study of gender, culture, and identity among Latinas in the U.S. It will grapple with the cultural forces that have historically created and re-created Latina identities.

AMCULT 250. American Magazines
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This class examines past and present magazines in the United States as a window into American history and the development of the media. It includes both secondary readings and primary research.

AMCULT 263 / HISTORY 262. The American South
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores race, culture, and "Southernness" in the twentieth century American South. We consider Southern identities in relation to historical events (such as segregation, the black freedom struggle, New Deal economics, recent Latin American migrations) and cultural elements (such as music, food, religion, sports). Throughout the course, we also pay attention to how the region's racial and cultural history has been shaped by gender, class, nation, and ethnicity.

AMCULT 270 / HISTORY 270. Religion in America
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A one-term survey of religious ideas, practices, and institutions in American history from the colonial period to the twentieth century.

AMCULT 273 / AAS 273. The Southern Novel in Historical Context
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Focusing on five classic southern novels, this course will examine how history and literature can illuminate each other, particularly in matters of race and race relations. Readings will include works by Harper Lee, Zora Neale Hurston, William Faulkner, Dames Dickey, and Alice Walker, while in-class lectures will address Southern literary history and the history of the South during the turbulent decades of the 1930s through the 1970s. We will also focus on the authors' lives and the ways in which they created works of lasting significance out of the raw materials of their experiences.

AMCULT 275. Practices of American Culture
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces interdisciplinary approaches to American studies. Students will consider the role that media, politics, history, family, and community play in shaping their understanding of their place in the nation. As a group, we consider the nation's ever increasing diversity and the U.S.'s role in a global context.

AMCULT 276 / ASIAN 276. India as Imaginary Homeland: an Introduction to Cultural Constructions of National Identity
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

What is India? This course surveys novels, short stories, essays and films that ask what South Asian identity is in colonial and postcolonial India, including in diaspora. There is a midterm and final open-book examination, four short reaction papers, as well as reading note cards due every class. This course assumes no prior knowledge of South Asia.

AMCULT 284 / HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present
First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the social and medical factors responsible for sickness and health, and the impact of disease upon society and the medical profession.

AMCULT 290 / ARABAM 290. Arab-American Literature
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to the English-language literature written by Arab-American authors; we read from various literary genres, including memoir, novels, personal essays, short stories, and poems. The themes we explore throughout the semester relate to identity and ethnicity, family and gender issues, and experiences of home and homelessness. The course is heavily discussion-centered; the members in the classroom, i.e. all the students and the instructor, comprise a community of readers who engage, analyze, and respond to the literature on a collaborative and active basis. This means that the critical and nuanced "work" produced throughout the course is shared equally by all members in the class's community of learners.

AMCULT 293 / WOMENSTD 293. 20th Century Writing by Women of Color
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

In this class we explore the narrative practices of Latinas, African American, Native American, and Asian American women, paying special attention to the way in which their writing has given voice to their experiences as women of color. Over the course of the semester we consider the cultural, linguistic, and familial traditions that have informed their respective approaches to feminism, antiracism, and oppositional politics.

AMCULT 295 / WOMENSTD 295. Sexuality in Western Culture
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an introductory course on human sexuality and its role in Western culture. The focus is theories about sexuality, the history of sexual beliefs and practices, and the relationship of these beliefs and practices to other aspects of society such as the economy, the class system, gender roles, etc. Texts are drawn from literature, history, contemporary social theory, the Bible, and pornography.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture
(1 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course provides undergraduates the opportunity to explore a specific topic in American life in depth using an interdisciplinary approach.

AMCULT 303. Race and Mixed Race
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how conceptions of race and mixed race have been historically shaped through, law, science, and popular culture.

AMCULT 304 / SOC 304. American Immigration
One introductory course in Sociology or American Culture. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

As America is a nation of immigrants, this course surveys the immigrant past of ethnic groups such as the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Surveying these varied ethnic histories, we analyze them from contrasting theoretical perspectives on race and ethnic relations, theories of assimilation, internal colonialism, etc. We seek to understand what is unique to and shared among these experiences.

AMCULT 305 / ASIANPAM 305. Asian Pacific American Community Service and Learning
(3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course examines strategies for building Asian Pacific American communities and developing leadership skills through community service learning and practice.

AMCULT 306 / PSYCH 317. Community Research
One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to basic methods of community research including the use of archival and census data, needs assessment techniques, resource analysis and elementary program evaluation. Emphasis is given to collaborative research which involves the community as a partner in establishing the research agenda and procedures. Readings will consist of two books and four to six additional readings each week. Students will complete a journal that is a synthesis and integration of the readings, an in-class midterm, and a group research paper. Students will present their research paper in a poster session.

AMCULT 308 / HISTORY 315. American Constitutional History
Students should have a good general knowledge of United States History, such as that acquired in HISTORY 260 and 261, or equivalent rigorous high school history courses. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

From the origins of popular sovereignty to today"s struggles for equality, this course investigates constitutional thought and activity in America. It examines constitutional amendments, Supreme Court cases, and political struggles (Revolution, the Constitutional Convention and ratification, Civil War, New Deal, Civil Rights era, Immigration, War on Terror), that have affected how "the people" are constituted. Readings will include a large share of primary sources.

AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies
(3). (SS). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course serves as a 300-level social science course in ethnic studies the content of which varies from term to term.

AMCULT 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies
(3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. F.

This course serves as a 300-level humanities course in ethnic studies the content of which varies from term to term.

AMCULT 313 / ANTHRCUL 314 / LATINOAM 313. Cuba and its Diaspora
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States Diaspora. Through political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, and visual art, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for thirty-five years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile.

AMCULT 314 / ASIANPAM 314 / HISTORY 378. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Asian/Pacific American History in the U.S. examines the nature of American Culture and Society through a specific study of Asian/Pacific Americans. This course provides a survey of the experience of Asian immigrants and Pacific-Islanders and their citizen descendants in the U.S. from late 18th-century to the present.

AMCULT 315 / HISTORY 377 / LATINOAM 315. History of Latina/os in the U.S.
(4). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AMCULT 312 or HISTORY 312.

This course is an exploration of the history and culture of Latina/os in the U.S. from the colonial era to the present. The diversity among groups that make up the Latina/o population of the U.S. will be examined.

AMCULT 316 / ANTHRCUL 315 / NATIVEAM 316. Native American Peoples of North America
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Survey of typical Native American cultures with a special topical focus on religion, world view, and social organization.

AMCULT 318 / MODGREEK 318. Greek-American Culture
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores questions of ethnicity, race, gender, and social class in the United States over the last two centuries as reflected in Greek-American history and culture. The objective is to encourage reflection on the cultural diversity of identity and awareness of racism, discrimination, and intolerance in our world.

AMCULT 319 / PSYCH 319. Empowering Families and Communities
One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course, organized around the dual themes of empowerment and community, introduces students to the principles and practices of community psychology. Students will be trained to implement a brief intervention designed to address the needs of children, youth or parents.

AMCULT 320 / JUDAIC 320. The Jewish Graphic Novel
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Are the Jews the people of the graphic book? Can the Bible be rendered as comics? Did Jewish immigrants invent American superheroes? This seminar explores the poignant and oftentimes subversive ways in which American, European, and Israeli graphic narratives reconfigure canonical Jewish texts and address pivotal events in twentieth-century Jewish history.

AMCULT 321 / PSYCH 325. Practicum in the Multicultural Community
One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 325 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. No more than 6 credits of directed readings/internships may be counted toward the American Culture major.

This experiential field course involves two visits per week to an African-American, Arab-American, or Latino community in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well- being of children and families. Projects involve activities such as tutoring, developing outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working on community education projects. Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff.

AMCULT 322 / NATIVEAM 322. Intermediate Ojibwe I
AMCULT 223 with a minimum grade of C-. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. F.

The course will serve as further introduction to Anishinaabe language and culture. Because Ojibwe is an endangered language, it is of utmost importance that the language is learned and used. This is a beautiful language with much to teach about living in this place. It deserves to be revitalized for future generations. After completing AMCULT 322 students should be able to use Ojibwe to: -- Create and respond to simple and compound statements and questions. Understand 500 - 1000 words. -- Understand some idiomatic phrases. -- Express detailed descriptions of events. -- Describe actions, people, places and things using complete sentences. -- Be able to write using standardized orthography. -- Understand the major contemporary cultural and political issues of the tribes of the Great Lakes.

AMCULT 323 / NATIVEAM 323. Intermediate Ojibwe II
AMCULT 322 with a minimum grade of C-. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3; 2 in the half-term). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. W.

AMCULT 324 / ASIANPAM 324 / ENGLISH 381. Asian American Literature
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers a range of topics in the study of Asian American literature. It raises questions concerning the canon of texts to be studied, the cultural construction of Asian American literature, race and ethnicity in America, and the ways in which these texts challenge and expand our understanding of American literature.

AMCULT 325 / ASIANPAM 325 / ENGLISH 388. Pacific Literary and Cultural Studies
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will introduce students to major authors and texts of Pacific and Pacific Islander American literature. We will attend to issues of representation, form and genre, identify, history, social and political movements, gender, sexuality, class, and race.

AMCULT 327 / ENGLISH 387 / LATINOAM 327. Latina/Latino Literature of the U.S.
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course, taught in English, considers the relationships between Latino/a literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production. A variety of topics are addressed in the study of such Latino/a literatures of the US as Chicano/a, Puerto Rican, and Cuban American.

AMCULT 328 / ENGLISH 382 / NATIVEAM 328. Native American Literature
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers a range of topics in the study of native American literature. It raises questions concerning the canon of texts studied, the cultural construction of ethnicity in America, and the ways in which these texts challenge and expand our understanding of American literature.

AMCULT 331 / HISTORY 356 / WOMENSTD 356. Health in America: Patterns, Experiences, and Inequalities
(3 - 4). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we will examine the broad profile of health in America, focusing on key issues in health disparities, illness experiences, and the role of medicine and technology. Students learn about health in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and other social relations and categories.

AMCULT 334 / SAC 334. Race, U.S. Culture and Digital Games
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how video games function as a window into U.S. race relations. We will study the history, theory, and practice of video games in the U.S. with particular attention to racial stereotyping, user demographics, diversity of the industry, and racial conflict in shared world and social games.

AMCULT 335. Arts and Culture in American Life
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course will explore ways in which arts and culture constitute and reflect American life through different kinds of representations and narrative forms.

AMCULT 336 / AAS 334. Popular Culture in Contemporary Black America
AAS 201. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course, students will explore the role of African Americans in U.S. popular culture from the 1830s to the present, from the representations of Blacks in Black face minstrelsy to the ways by which African Americans have adopted, adapted and confronted the legacies of racism.

AMCULT 337. A Survey of American Blues Music
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on blues a musical influence on many other forms and styles -- jazz, rock, and roll, etc -- as well as the socio-cultural impact that the blues have had on American society. We will examine the history of the music, its associated literature, and postmodern mythology.

AMCULT 340 / AAS 340. A History of Blacks in American Film
AAS 201. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

AMCULT 342 / HISTORY 368 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

An interdisciplinary course providing perspective on the contemporary family by studying its historical development. The course includes consideration of changing gender roles; sexuality; childrearing; work patterns; race, ethnicity and class; the changing role of state in family relations.

AMCULT 343 / JUDAIC 343. American Jews and Media Industries
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Jews built on niche opportunities in emergent and developing media enterprises: movies, photography, recorded music, radio, comics, and television. As these "canned" forms of entertainment became popular and prestigious, controversies flared over the roles of Jews in "the mass media." Class discussions include a wide range of illustrative and analytical materials.

AMCULT 344 / JUDAIC 344. Passing: Race, Religion and Getting By
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Passing is the pretense of being a different sort of person for advantage or protection. The course examines the issue of Passing in relation to gender, race, sexuality, class, and ethnicity's (including "The Jewish Problem" of assimilation) through historical and theoretical studies, memoirs, short stories, plays and films.

AMCULT 345. American Politics and Society
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will look closely at some of the major issues facing contemporary America from multiple disciplinary perspectives in the social sciences. It will offer a unique, interdisciplinary approach to contemporary American society and politics.

AMCULT 348 / HISTORY 346. History of American Radicalism
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Starting with abolitionism and early women's rights, this course examines 150 years in the development of a modern Left in the U.S., highlighting labor-based radicalism as well as militant protest by people of color, feminists, antiwar activists, disaffected youth, and other liberation advocates of the latter 20th century, culminating with recent "anti-globalization" activism.

AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture
American Culture concentrators. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An intensive study of the various approaches to American culture. Particular attention is paid to selected primary texts and cultural artifacts from one or more periods. Each period is examined from several standpoints such as history, literature, popular culture, folk culture, sociology, and the arts. The course helps students integrate various topics and disciplinary approaches into the study of American culture.

AMCULT 353 / ASIANPAM 353 / HISTORY 454. Asians in American Film and Television
(4; 3 in the half-term). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine how film and television have reflected and shaped Asian culture and identity in American history. Through screenings of feature films and documentaries produced by Asian Americans and non-Asians, we will study the shifting representations of Asians across historical periods from the 19th century to the present.

AMCULT 354 / ENGLISH 312 / ENVIRON 354. Camp Davis: History and Literature of the Rockies
Consent of department required. (3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Su at Camp Davis, Wyoming. May not be taken pass/fail.

This course is taught onsite at the University of Michigan's Camp Davis Geology field station south of Jackson Hole, Wyoming. It examines a range of human experiences and expressions of place, centered on the area of Jackson Hole, but extending in conceptual terms across the central and northern Rocky Mountain region and to the American West as a whole.

AMCULT 355. Topics in American Creative Expression
(1 - 3). (CE). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is in studio and performing arts.

AMCULT 363 / ASIANPAM 363 / WOMENSTD 363. Asian/Pacific Islander American Women
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an upper-division, interdisciplinary course focusing on the experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander American women in the United States from historical, anthropological, sociological, and psychological and literary perspectives.

AMCULT 365. AIDS and America
Not available to students who have completed AMCULT 206 when taught with the topic "AIDS in America" (Topic #1). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

AIDS and America studies the ways HIV/AIDS has developed in the United States and elsewhere in the world. We also examine the U.S. as an actor in the global epidemic.

AMCULT 366 / HISTORY 353 / WOMENSTD 366. Sex and Sexuality in U.S. Popular Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

We will explore how changing ideas about sex, sexuality, and gender appeared in certain types of twentieth-century popular culture. As a group, we will learn to interpret media, such as movies or television, as historical texts that provide insight into past notions about sex in the United States.

AMCULT 367 / HISTORY 367 / NATIVEAM 367. American Indian History
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will survey the social, cultural and political history of American Indians. The course explores the dynamics of Native American history from conquest to the present mostly within the boundaries of the United States.

AMCULT 369 / HISTORY 369. The History of U.S. Mass Culture From Minstrelsy to Hip Hop
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an intensive historical examination of U.S. mass culture over the past two centuries. We begin with the very first "culture industries"of the 1820s followed by the expansion and evolution of U.S. commercial entertainment through the dawn of electronic media and globalization. The approach is deliberately comparative, cutting across many different eras and media, from museum exhibitions, theater, dance, and circuses to radio, television, film, and the Internet.

AMCULT 371 / HISTORY 371 / WOMENSTD 371. Women in American History Since 1870
(4). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels.

AMCULT 373 / HISTORY 373. History of the U.S. West
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines both the "place" and the "process" of the history of the U.S. West, a shifting region of the Native North America that was the object first of Spanish, French, and English imperial designs, then of U.S. expansionism, and finally a region with peculiarities to the federal government, distinctive patterns of race relations, and a unique place in American cultural memory.

AMCULT 374 / HISTORY 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties"
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

The current debate over the Sixties and the history of that decade mirror the very essence of American Culture. This course will explore the era of the Sixties using a variety of methodologies and disciplinary approaches.

AMCULT 380 / LATINOAM 380 / SAC 380. Studies in Transnational Media
Prior coursework in Screen Arts & Cultures, Communications (TV), or Latino Studies. Knowledge of Spanish is not required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Drawing from writings in cultural theory and criticism in both English and Spanish. This course will examine national and transnational trends in Spanish and Portuguese language TV, alternative video and cinema since WW II.

AMCULT 381 / LATINOAM 381 / SAC 381. Latinas/Latinos and the Media
Consent of department required. AMCULT 213 or SAC 236 or AMCULT 380/SAC 380 or SPANISH 380. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the access and contributions of Latinas/os to the U.S. media from an historical perspective, with a culminating emphasis on the contemporary period. The cultural scope is pan-Latino, covering a range of genres and formats, from documentary to experimental film and television.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis
Consent of instructor required. Juniors only. (3; 2 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

AMCULT 387 / HISTORY 387 / JUDAIC 387. History of American Jews
(4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history of American Jews from the colonial era to the 21st century, focusing on immigration, politics, cultural creativity, religious innovation, and the establishment of a diasporic community with ties to Jews throughout the world. The course asks how Jews resolved the tensions between being Jewish and American.

AMCULT 388. Field Study
Consent of instructor required. Sophomore standing. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 6 credits of directed readings/internships may be counted toward the American Culture major. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

AMCULT 390. Internship in Arab American Studies
Consent of instructor required. (2 - 4; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. No more than 6 credits of directed readings/internships may be counted toward the American Culture major. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course entails an internship in local Arab American organizations. Contact internship faculty advisor about availability, details, and requirements. Having taken at least one course in Arab American Studies in recommended but not required. Can sign up for 2 credits (6 hours of work), 3 credits (9 hours of work), or 4 credits (12 hours of work). Transportation needed.

AMCULT 398. Junior Honors Writing Workshop
Consent of instructor required. Permission of a concentration advisor in American Culture. (1 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

AMCULT 399. Race in America
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how historical notions of race continue to haunt U.S. society. Students consider how racial ideologies originate, developed, and changed over time. They also ask what the meanings of race and ethnicity have to do with interconnected notions of gender, class, religion, sexuality and nationalism.

AMCULT 405. Topics in American Culture
(1 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course provides undergraduates the opportunity to explore a specific topic in American life in depth using an interdisciplinary approach.

AMCULT 406 / AAS 384 / ENGLISH 384. Caribbean Literature
AAS 202. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

The course considers a range of topics in the study of Caribbean literature. It raises questions concerning the canon of texts to be studied, the cultural construction of Caribbean literature, race and ethnicity.

AMCULT 407. The History of American Folk Music: Culture, Politics, Music
Consent of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we investigate the history of scholarly and popular attention to folk music in America. It will deal with much more than just the songs and musics of the vernacular (and popular) American cultural landscape.

AMCULT 409 / MUSICOL 409. American Roots Music from Sacred Harp to Contemporary Blues
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course combines Humanities and Creative Expression as students explore American roots music, build and perform on their own instruments, and do fieldwork in Chicago and the South. Topics and genres include Sacred Harp, Blues, Folk, Cajun, Country, Southern culture, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural geography, urban-rural dynamics, etc.

AMCULT 411 / WOMENSTD 411. Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
One course in Women's Studies or American Culture. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Queer identity is associated with urban, bourgeois, coastal lifestyles. Country music is linked to heterosexual white, rural, working-class, Southern, and Midwestern cultures and often to "redneck" bigotry. How has music that many people perceive as homophobic and racist become a medium for multicultural queer social and sexual exchange?

AMCULT 420 / LATINOAM 420 / SPANISH 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies
Nine credits chosen from: SPANISH 279 and 399 or two RCLANG 324; and six credits chosen from SPANISH 279 and 399. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Comparative survey of historical and theoretical development in Latin American and Latino/a audio visual media, with an emphasis on the cinema.

AMCULT 421 / SOC 423. Stratification
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to sociological concepts and theories of social stratification.

AMCULT 422 / NATIVEAM 422. Advanced Ojibwe I
AMCULT 323 with a minimum grade of C-; or Graduate Standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. F.

The course will foster Ojibwe language use at all levels. Students in this course will be exposed to longer written and oral narratives as well as have the opportunity to design projects to foster language revitalization. Students will work with one another, the Ojibwe community, and affiliated institutions to produce texts and analysis that support Ojibwe language. Students of AMCULT 422 will use Ojibwe to: -- Sustain limited and/or longer two-way conversation with fluent speakers. -- Understand or make logical assumptions about the meaning of new or unfamiliar words. -- Correctly use idiomatic phrases in speech and writing. -- Describe actions, people, places and things using compound sentences and paragraphs. -- Be able to create short oral and written narratives. -- Understand the importance and significance of language revitalization including preservation of dialectal and aesthetic variation.

AMCULT 423 / NATIVEAM 423. Advanced Ojibwe II
AMCULT 422 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); OR Graduate Standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. W.

Designed to advance understanding of connected discourse. Grammatical structures are studied in more detail. Some emphasis on recognition of forms from different dialects. Concentration on expanding vocabulary and recognizing the patterns of word formation of informants. Thrust is on study of actual text material.

AMCULT 425 / WOMENSTD 425. Feminist Practice of Oral History
One course in WOMENSTD or AMCULT. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. We examine various theories and methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We also explore issues such as "insider-outsider" perspectives, relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, our role as "narrator," legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories.

AMCULT 436 / MUSICOL 456. Music of Asian Americans
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

AMCULT 461 / ANTHRCUL 461 / LING 461 / NATIVEAM 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages.

AMCULT 462 / HISTORY 461. The American Revolution
(4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

An analysis of the causes, consequences and nature of the American Revolution.

AMCULT 479 / HISTART 479. The Arts in American Life
Prior coursework in History of Art or American Culture or American History; and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

A focused, critical examination of the relation of art, architecture, and material objects to specific problems in American culture and history. (Topics and subtitles vary).

AMCULT 489. Senior Essay
Consent of instructor required. Senior concentrators and AMCULT 350. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

AMCULT 490 / SAC 451. American Film Genres
Junior standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit. W.

The development of American film genres as a popular art form, considered within the broad context of American cultural development since the late nineteenth century.

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis
Consent of instructor required. Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. No more than 6 credits of directed readings/internships may be counted toward the American Culture major. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of AMCULT 493, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics in the social sciences focusing on American Culture studies primarily for juniors, seniors, and graduate students.

AMCULT 498. Capstone Seminar in American Culture
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

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