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Courses in LSA Near Eastern Studies
The Department of Near Eastern Studies offers instruction in the languages, literatures, histories, cultures and religions of the ancient Near East and the medieval and modern Middle East. The department’s language offerings provide the foundation for the academic study of the literatures, histories, cultures and religions of the region. The ancient language offerings include Sumerian, Egyptian, Akkadian, Hittite, Ugaritic, Avestan, Aramaic, and Classical Hebrew. The medieval and modern language offerings include Armenian, Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, and Uzbek. The undergraduate programs in the department are designed to initiate the academic study of the region, enhance the student’s critical skills, and promote an increased understanding of the historical processes underlying the transformation of cultures. Special Department Policy: The student must maintain at least a grade of a C in each term of a required concentration language. Those courses for which a student receives a lesser grade must be repeated.
Armenian Studies (ARMENIAN)
ARMENIAN 171 / AAPTIS 171. Western Armenian, I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ARMENIAN 173/AAPTIS 173.

Introduction to the Western Armenian Language with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture will be employed.

ARMENIAN 172 / AAPTIS 172. Western Armenian, II
AAPTIS/ARMENIAN 171. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS/ARMENIAN 173.

Introduction to the Western Armenian Language with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. A balance approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture will be employed.

ARMENIAN 271 / AAPTIS 271. Intermediate Western Armenian, I
AAPTIS/ARMENIAN 172 or 173. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ARMENIAN 273/AAPTIS 273.

Continuation of Western Armenian 171/172. Reading, composition and conversation. A balanced approach, giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture.

ARMENIAN 272 / AAPTIS 272. Intermediate Western Armenian, II
AAPTIS/ARMENIAN 271. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ARMENIAN 273/AAPTIS 273.

Continuation of Armenian 171/172. Reading, composition and conversation. A balance approach, giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture.

ARMENIAN 274 / AAPTIS 274. Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course will explore various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the present, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It will highlight the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multi-national region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformations.

ARMENIAN 287 / HISTORY 287. Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

ARMENIAN 416 / AAPTIS 474. An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course will outline a history of Armenian Literature from the 16th to the 20th centuries, concentrating on the works of major authors who flourished within and without Armenia. Both the traditional and new literature will be analyzed, but a greater emphasis will be placed on the 19th-20th centuries, including Eastern and Western Armenian literatures, literature of the post-Genocide dispersion, and that of Soviet Armenia.

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