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Courses in LSA Biology

Biology is an Interdepartmental Program administered jointly by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB).

Introductory Biology Credit Limitation

The maximum amount of credit that can be earned in introductory biology courses is 17 credits. Students interested in concentrating in Biology, General Biology, or Plant Biology must complete BIOLOGY 171, 172/174 and 173, or BIOLOGY 195 and 173, or equivalent.

Biology (BIOLOGY)
BIOLOGY 100. Biology for Nonscientists
Some exposure to biology and chemistry at the high school level is assumed. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Not open to those with Advanced Placement or "Departmental" credit in biology, nor to those concentrating in the biological sciences. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. F.

BIOLOGY 101 / ENVIRON 101. Energy, Food, and the Environment
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. F.

In recent years it has become apparent that current energy and food sourcing is damaging the environment from global warming to pesticide runoff. This course treats the issues of energy, food, and the environment from a biological and sociopolitical point of view. It emphasizes the historical trajectories that generated current conditions and the scientific options for revamping our energy and food systems to make them more consistent with environmental sustainability.

BIOLOGY 102. Practical Botany
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. W.

BIOLOGY 106. Quantitative Reasoning in Biological Sciences
MATH 103 or MATH 105 (corequisite). (3 in the half-term). (NS). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

This course helps students gain confidence in and improve their quantitative reasoning skills. Problem solving and analysis of data and figures in the biosciences is emphasized. Students work in teams and individually to build the skills needed to continue to successfully learn mathematics, chemistry, and biology.

BIOLOGY 107. Evolution of Life
Some exposure to biology at the high school level is assumed. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

This course provides an introduction to biological evolution. We consider: the evidence for evolution; an overview of the evolution of cells, organisms, and viruses; evolutionary themes of natural selection, chance, and cooperation; and the consequences of an evolutionary world view for understanding disease, biological diversity, and human culture.

BIOLOGY 108. Introduction to Animal Diversity
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. W.

BIOLOGY 109. Ecological Knowledge and Environmental Problem Solving
(3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. W.

The main point is to gain an understanding of the types of scientific knowledge that are needed to solve environmental problems, and to develop an appreciation of problem-solving skills. This course uses a case study approach, and takes the perspective that science consists of the creation and testing of theory.

BIOLOGY 110 / AOSS 171 / EARTH 171 / ENSCEN 171 / ENVIRON 110. Introduction of Global Change: Physical Processes
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. Satisfies the geography requirement for State of Michigan certification for social studies teachers. F.

Students learn about the evolution of the universe, Earth, our changing environment and our planets living organisms. Global Change I, which is part of the GC curriculum, assumes no prior science background. Homework and laboratories use computer-based systems modeling and analysis, and includes a group presentation.

BIOLOGY 116. Biology of Sex
(3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

Sex is not universally used by living organisms for reproduction. When and how it evolved, and the various mechanisms in which it operates is a primary concern for most biological disciplines. This course will cover the origins, mechanisms and implications sexuality has for biodiversity. The human aspects of sexual biology will be examined in terms of how we fit into the concepts.

BIOLOGY 118. AIDS and Other Health Crises
(3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. W.

A course focused on concepts of health and disease and their impact on society as well as the impact of social structures on health and disease. Topics include AIDS, syphilis, cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, and plague.

BIOLOGY 120. First Year Seminar in Biology
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

These seminars, which are restricted to first-year students, are small-group classes (approximately 15-25 students) taught by regular and emeritus faculty.

BIOLOGY 121. Topics in Biology
(1 - 4). (NS). (BS). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is designed to acquaint students with an (introductory) area of biology that is not a usual part of the Biology Department curriculum.

BIOLOGY 125. Biotechnology and Society
A high school level course in biology. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCNSCI 270. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

This course provides an introduction to the principles and practices involved in the genetic manipulation of organisms. Topics include animal, plant, microbial, and medical biotechnology. The aim is to help students understand the biological basis for current biotechnology activities, as well as to point out ethical and social concerns that arise from these activities.

BIOLOGY 130. Animal Behavior
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. F.

This course is an introduction to the behavior of animals in their natural environment. Students gain a background in evolution and learn how to use natural selection to understand why animals behave the way they do.

BIOLOGY 144. Life: Decoded - Genomics in Society
(3). (NS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims for students (including those who may not necessarily focus on a career in science) to acquire an understanding of how the genomics revolution is transforming many facets of our society.

BIOLOGY 171. Introductory Biology: Ecology and Evolution
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. BIOLOGY 171 and 172 can be taken in either order.

BIOLOGY 171 is a one-term introductory course in ecology and evolutionary biology that imparts factual and conceptual knowledge on the origin and complex interactions of the earth's biodiversity and ecosystems. Its goal is to help students to develop scientific hypothesis-testing, critical-thinking and writing skills. BIOLOGY 171 is part of a two-semester introductory unit that includes BIOLOGY 172 and 173.

BIOLOGY 172. Introductory Biology - Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental
Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 162, 163, 174, or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology. BIOLOGY 171 and 172 can be taken in either order.

BIOLOGY 172 is a one-term introductory course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that imparts factual and conceptual knowledge on how cells, organs, and organisms work. One of its goal is to help students develop scientific hypothesis-testing, critical-thinking and writing skills. BIOLOGY 172 is part of a two-semester introductory unit that includes BIOLOGY 171 and 173.

BIOLOGY 173. Introductory Biology Laboratory
BIOLOGY 163 or 171 or 172 or 174 or 195. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students should have completed one of the introductory lecture courses [either BIOLOGY 171 or (172 or 174)] and be concurrently enrolled in the other. (2). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed BIOLOGY 162. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 173 is a integrative, project-based, one-term introductory laboratory course intended for concentrators in any of the biological sciences, other science programs, and pre-professional studies. Students should minimally have completed one of the two introductory biology lecture course, BIOLOGY 171 or 172, and be enrolled in the other.

BIOLOGY 174. Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology
Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 172 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 17 credits elected in introductory biology.

This course covers fundamental topics in biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology. Students gain an appreciation for how biology fits into their daily lives. Learning occurs through a problem-solving collaborative approach rather than a lecture format.

BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial
Consent of instructor required. Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

BIOLOGY 205. Developmental Biology
BIOLOGY 162 or 163; or BIOLOGY 171 and either 172 or 174; or BIOLOGY 195. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to give students an introduction to animal and plant developmental biology. The course covers embryological, genetic and molecular biological approaches towards studying how development occurs. Topics include: cell movement during gastrulation, control of cell division, cell-cell communication and regulation of gene expression.

BIOLOGY 207. Introductory Microbiology
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174), & 173, or BIOLOGY 195 & 173; AND CHEM 210. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. F and W.

The lectures will trace the history of microbiology, microbial growth and metabolism, microbial diversity, and the importance of microbes in the environment, industry and medicine. The laboratory sessions introduce microscopy, aseptic technique, staining, and the isolation, culture and identification of microbes from the local environment.

BIOLOGY 222. From Message to Mind: An Introduction to Neurobiology
BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 172 or 174 or 195. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W.

An introduction to molecular, cellular, and systems-level neurobiology. Students learn the fundamentals of bioelectricity and its origins, intercellular communication, and the structural interrelations between cells that produce the nervous system. Simple behaviors, and their neural basis, are also treated.

BIOLOGY 225. Principles of Animal Physiology and Neurobiology
BIOLOGY 171 and (172 or 174); or BIOLOGY 195. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F and W.

Lectures concerned with mechanisms by which animals function. Emphasis on physiology of the whole animal, including consideration of functional systems (e.g., digestion, circulation, etc.).

BIOLOGY 226. Animal Physiology Laboratory
BIOLOGY 173. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225. (2). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. F, W.

These laboratory exercises deal (usually concurrently) with topics covered in lecture - mechanisms by which animals function.

BIOLOGY 230. Introduction to Plant Biology
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174), & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (4; 5 in the half-term). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F; Sp/Su at the Biological Station. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

This course presents a broad, integrated overview of plant biology including economic and environmental aspects. The main themes are plant diversity, structure, function, development, and ecology.

BIOLOGY 252. Vertebrate Evolution and Diversity
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174), & 173 or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. F.

Lecture and laboratory course on the evolution and diversity of vertebrate animals. Lectures cover major evolutionary trends in the structure, function, and diversity of vertebrates as well as the interrelationships among vertebrate groups. Laboratory includes detailed comparative study of representative vertebrates and survey of morphological diversity across many groups.

BIOLOGY 255 / ENVIRON 255. Plant Diversity
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

This course examines plant diversity by groups, ranging from algae and nonvascular plants through primitive vascular plants and culminating in flowering plants. Using an evolutionary perspective, it treats plants as organisms and emphasizes the innovations and structural adaptations of the various plant groups as well as life history strategies. Weekly field trips allow exploration of local natural areas.

BIOLOGY 256. Animals Functioning in Environments
BIOLOGY 171 & 172. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) AP Physics or PHYSICS 135, 140 or 160 or equivalent; and AP Math or MATH 115 or 116 or equivalent. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Discover intriguing research being done by environmental physiologists, ecological morphologists and evolutionary physiologists! Learn about applications to environmental health and animal conservation. Investigate how evolutionary history influences animal form and function. Learn how physiological and functional patterns relate to the diversity of Earth's habitats. Learn from human, vertebrate, and invertebrate examples.

BIOLOGY 281 / ENVIRON 281. General Ecology
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173; AND a laboratory course in CHEM (BIOLOGY 172 and 173 are strongly recommended). (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381 or ENVIRON 381. F and W.

The course introduces the basic concepts and principles of ecology as applied to the study of individuals, populations, and communities of both plants and animals.

BIOLOGY 288. Animal Diversity
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174), & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

BIOLOGY 288 will provide biology majors with a survey of the animal phyla in the context of discussions of major issues in ecology and evolution. Students will see the diversity of behavior, mating systems, life history, and diverse interactions.

BIOLOGY 305. Genetics
BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or [171 and (172 or 174)] or 195. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission in Eukaryotes; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes, the genetic code, and mutation; recombinant DNA, RFLP mapping, the Human Genome Project; gene regulation, transposons; population genetics; and quantitative genetics.

BIOLOGY 482. Limnology
Three laboratory courses in Biology. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Su at the Biological Station.

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