Undergraduate Course Catalog
Effective Term
Requirement or Grouping
Listings Per Page
Subject
  or   Department
Show Descriptions Show Course Guide Term Links For Past Two Years
Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
   Page 1 of 1, Results 1 - 64 of 64   
Courses in LSA Chemistry
The curricula in Chemistry serve those preparing for careers in chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, chemical engineering, pharmacy, and allied fields as well as those seeking a general knowledge of chemistry as part of a liberal arts education. Beyond the first-year courses, there is an emphasis on development of technical knowledge and laboratory experience needed in chemistry and related scientific fields.

Introductory Courses

The Chemistry Department has three types of courses available to students starting toward careers in any of the sciences, engineering, or medicine. Students are placed into these courses according to the results of the tests in chemistry and mathematics that they take during orientation. Either CHEM 130 or 210/211 can be the starting point for students interested in the sciences, engineering, or medicine. CHEM 130 has a section reserved for students who would benefit from more frequent contact with faculty. Honors students, students with Advanced Placement in chemistry, and other students with good preparation in high school chemistry have the opportunity to start their study in chemistry with CHEM 210/211, which introduce the major concepts of chemistry in the context of organic chemistry. This curriculum allows students to progress more rapidly to advanced courses in CHEM and to be able to participate earlier in undergraduate research.

Special Departmental Policies

The department requires that a student earn a grade of at least C– in all CHEM courses and mathematics and physics courses which are prerequisite for subsequent elections. Prerequisites must be taken for a grade.

Safety Regulations

No contact lenses will be allowed in any chemistry laboratory. In laboratory classes, students must wear either prescription or safety glasses at all times.

Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 100. Concepts in Chemistry
(1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to a fundamental concept in the field of Chemistry.

CHEM 105 / AOSS 105 / ENSCEN 105 / ENVIRON 105. Our Changing Atmosphere
(3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The science of the greenhouse effect, stratospheric ozone depletion, polar ozone holes, and urban smog. These phenomena and their possible consequences are discusses, along with the properties and behavior of the atmosphere and its components of the environment.

CHEM 108 / EARTH 130 / PHYSICS 119. The Physical World
High-school algebra. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

The physics, chemistry, and pre-calculus (algebraic) concepts of comprehensive Earth and planetary science are covered for those students who feel less than fully prepared for existing college-level science classes. The course is aimed at students in need of a science course, particularly those who will not readily select more than one physical science course as undergraduates at UM. Weekly discussions by a GSI will complement and amplify the lectures.

CHEM 109 / PHYSICS 109. Natural Science: Bridging the Gaps
(3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The class will be an interdisciplinary, team-taught introduction to the scientific method, involving subject matter from physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, biology, and ethics. It will employ an active classroom. An important component will be demonstrations which will provide nearly hands-on experience with relevant phenomena.

CHEM 120. First Year Seminar in Chemistry
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

These seminars, which are restricted to first-year students, are small group classes (approximately 15-25 students) taught by regular and emeritus faculty.

CHEM 125. General Chemistry Laboratory I
To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 126. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Su.

A three-hour laboratory accompanied by a biweekly one hour discussion with a focus on experiment design, data analysis, and oral communication skills.

CHEM 126. General Chemistry Laboratory II
To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 125. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Su.

A three-hour laboratory accompanied by a biweekly one hour discussion with a focus on experiment design, data analysis, and oral communication skills.

CHEM 130. General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department. (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry. Neither CHEM 130, nor AP credits earned for CHEM 130, count toward the minors in Chemistry. F, W, Su.

This General Chemistry course provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria.

CHEM 210. Structure and Reactivity I
High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with CHEM 211. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Students who have completed CHEM 215 will not receive credit for CHEM 210. F, W, Su.

This is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry.

CHEM 211. Investigations in Chemistry
To be taken concurrently with CHEM 210. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Students who have completed CHEM 216 will not receive credit for CHEM 211. F, W, Su.

An introduction to laboratory techniques in chemistry using inorganic and organic compounds, with emphasis on thin layer chromatography, stoichiometry, acid-base chemistry, and microscale organic reactions.

CHEM 215. Structure and Reactivity II
CHEM 210/211. To be taken with CHEM 216. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

Continuation of CHEM 210. Students get further practice in applying the major concepts of chemistry to predicting the physical and chemical properties of organic compounds, including macromolecules, both synthetic and biological.

CHEM 216. Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds
CHEM 210/211. Must be taken with CHEM 215. (2). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods.

CHEM 218. Independent Study in Biochemistry
Consent of instructor required. For students with less than junior standing. (1). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

Undergraduate Biochemistry research for students with junior standing. May be elected more than once for a maximum of 4 credits towards the degree.

CHEM 219. Independent Study in Chemistry
Consent of instructor required. For students with less than junior standing. (1). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

Undergraduate Chemistry research for students with less than junior standing. Students concentrating in Biochemistry should elect 218 rather than 219.

CHEM 230. Physical Chemical Principles and Applications
CHEM 215/216. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in Chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260. F, W, Sp.

CHEM 230 is an intro to the physical principles underlying some of the major topics of inorganic and analytical chemistry. The liquid and solid states of matter, phase transitions, solutions, electrochemistry, coordination complexes, spectroscopy, and the principles of thermodynamics that explain observed chemical reactions will be studied from the viewpoint of the experimental scientist, with an emphasis on the application of chemical principles to a wide range of professions.

CHEM 241. Introduction to Chemical Analysis
Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 242. (2). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 245. F, W.

Introduction to the chemical basis of both classical wet analysis methods and modern instrumental analysis methods. Course emphasize statistical methods and the analytical applications of equilibria, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and radioactivity.

CHEM 242. Introduction to Chemical Analysis Laboratory
Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 241. (2). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 246 or CHEM 247. F, W.

Introductory laboratory in wet chemical and modern instrumental analysis. Experiments emphasize equilibria, separations, electrochemistry, and spectroscopy.

CHEM 245. Biomedical Analytical Chemistry
CHEM 130 or equivalent. CHEM 245 must be taken concurrently with the accompanying lecture/laboratory offerings, CHEM 246/247. (2). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 241.

This course addresses the principles of analytical chemistry relevant to the practice of modern clinical chemistry measurement techniques. These techniques are employed routinely to detect the levels of physiological species in blood and urine samples.

CHEM 246. Biomedical Analytical Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM 130 or equivalent. CHEM 246 (LEC/LAB) must be taken concurrently with CHEM 245 and CHEM 247. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 242.

The focus of this lecture/laboratory course is training students on the basic laboratory methods used in performing quantitative measurements of physiologically important species (glucose, potassium, salicylate, urea, creatinine, etc.) in simulated blood and urine samples using electrochemical, spectroscopic and separation techniques.

CHEM 247. Biomedical Analytical Chemistry Laboratory II
CHEM 130 or equivalent. CHEM 247 must be taken together with CHEM 245 and CHEM 246. (1). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 242.

This lecture/laboratory course focuses on basic laboratory methods used in performing quantitative measurements of physiologically important species (glucose, potassium, salicylate, urea, creatinine, etc.), as well as in simulated blood and urine samples using electrochemical, spectroscopic and separation techniques.

CHEM 260. Chemical Principles
CHEM 210/211, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 135 or 140 or 160. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted for students who have completed or are enrolled in BIOPHYS 370. F, W, Sp.

Introduction to the quantal nature of matter, basic chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. Description of the fundamental physical principles that underlie spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis.

CHEM 261. Introduction to Quantum Chemistry
CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). CHEM 261 is intended primarily for Chemical Engineering students. (1). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260. CHEM 261 is intended for Chemical Engineering students only. F, W, Sp.

CHEM 262. Mathematical Methods for Chemists
MATH 115, MATH 116. (4). (MSA). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides students with a comprehensive and rigorous introduction to the mathematical concepts and tools most relevant to the chemical sciences. Topics covered include linear algebra, multivariable calculus, ordinary and partial differential equations, probability and statistics. These mathematical concepts and tools are key for the development of group theory, quantum chemistry, chemical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics.

CHEM 302. Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure, Reactivity, and Function
CHEM 210/211 or 215/216. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. A student can receive credit for only one of CHEM 302 or CHEM 303. F, W.

This course will provide an introduction to the structure and properties of those elements other than carbon. Topics that will be included are the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and extended solids, bonding, periodicity, main group and transition element chemistry, catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry, ceramic superconductors, fundamental and applied chemistry of organometallics, inorganic polymers and materials chemistry, metals in proteins and nucleic acids and how these metals are involved in biological catalysis.

CHEM 303. Introductory Bioinorganic Chemistry: The Role of Metals in Life
CHEM 210/211 or 215/216. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. A student can receive credit for only one of CHEM 302 or CHEM 303.

An alternative to the CHEM 302 requirement for Chemistry and Biochemistry majors, the course covers fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry in the context of the role of metals in biological systems. Special emphasis is put on the role of metals in biological systems, and the connection between fundamental (classroom) knowledge of biological processes with respect to metals, and their relation to commonly known phenomena--diseases, pollution, alternative energies, evolution, industrial processes, etc.

CHEM 351. Fundamentals of Biochemistry
Completion of BIOLOGY 172 or equivalent; CHEM 210 and completion or concurrent in CHEM 215. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415. F, W.

This course is designed to serve as an introduction to biochemistry for students intending to pursue the BS concentration in biochemistry and for others who are interested in gaining an overview of the fundamental chemistry underlying cellular functions. The material includes an introduction to the structures of biological macromolecules and an overview of the fundamental cellular processes associated with metabolism, biosynthesis, and replication. It is taught from a chemical perspective with an emphasis of understanding biochemical phenomena through chemical structure and mechanism.

CHEM 352. Introduction to Biochemical Research Techniques
Current or prior enrollment in CHEM 351. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W.

This laboratory course is designed to introduce students to widely used techniques in contemporary biochemistry and analysis of biochemical data. Topics include techniques for the purification and characterization of proteins, enzymes and nucleic acids and some introduction to computational biochemistry and bioinformatics.

CHEM 370 / BIOPHYS 370 / PHYSICS 370. Physical and Chemical Principles Behind Biology and Medicine
MATH 215; and PHYSICS 235 or 240. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) CHEM 130 or placement in 210. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W.

This course is an introduction to the fundamental physical and chemical principles of biophysics. It covers quantum aspects of matter, thermodynamics, kinetics and statistical mechanics in the context of biological applications.

CHEM 398. Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry
Consent of instructor required. Junior standing, and permission of a Biochemistry concentration advisor and the professor who will supervise the research. (1 - 4). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

Undergraduate Biochemistry research for students with junior standing or above. Students concentrating in Chemistry should elect 399 rather than 398.

CHEM 399. Undergraduate Research
Consent of instructor required. Junior standing, and permission of a chemistry concentration advisor and the professor who will supervise the research. (1 - 4). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

CHEM 402. Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 302 or CHEM 303, and 461/462. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

CHEM 402 is a second term course in inorganic chemistry at the undergraduate level. It has as a prerequisite CHEM 302. The goals of the course are two-fold. On the one hand, it will build upon the concepts presented in the earlier course. Topics included here will emphasize the interrelations of ideas presented earlier in the curriculum. For example, discussion can include the relation between oxidation and reduction to acidity, periodic trends in acids and bases, the relation of hard and soft ideas to molecular orbital theory, periodic trends in standard reduction potentials, the relation of molecular structure to conductivity and magnetism and so forth. The key topics to be covered in this portion of the course include acid-base chemistry, theories of bonding, periodic properties and d-metal complexes. The course goes on to cover additional topics selected from issues in catalysis, bioinorganic chemistry, structure-property relations, solid state chemistry, organometallic chemistry, kinetics of organometallic reactions, f-block compounds, electron deficient clusters and quantum models of structure and bonding.

CHEM 415. Responsible Conduct in Chemical Research
(1). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Every discipline at the University of Michigan engages in research. The approach to performing research varies significantly between disciplines. Half of the course will be discipline-specific research methods and half will be the responsible conduct of research (RCR). This course will teach research methods for the natural sciences. Topic areas include: appropriate citation of sources and avoiding plagiarism; authorship and publication practices and responsibilities; acquisition, management, ownership and sharing of data; research misconduct, including data fabrication and falsification; personal, professional and financial conflicts of interest; supervisory and mentoring relationships and responsibilities; responsibilities of collaborative research; protection of human beings and welfare of laboratory animals when research involves human participants and animal subjects. This will include an overview of example research projects, the methods for performing research, and the tools needed. The mechanisms for communicating research, such as conferences, articles, papers and books will be discussed. In addition there are areas common to conducting research in any discipline, such as appropriate citation of sources, authorship practices, acquisition, management and sharing of data.

CHEM 417 / BIOPHYS 417 / PHYSICS 417. Dynamical Processes in Biophysics
MATH 216 or 256 or 286 or 296 or 316; and PHYSICS 340 or BIOPHYS 370 or CHEM 463. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The physical basis of diffusive processes in biology and biochemistry, and optical spectroscopic means for measuring its rates. Topics include: membrane electrical potentials, nerve impulses, synaptic transmission, the physics of chemoreception by cells, motion and reaction kinetics of membrane components, optical microscopy, visible and UV light absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence, quasielastic light scattering, mathematics of random fluctuations, and chaotic processes in biology.

CHEM 419. Intermediate Physical Organic Chemistry
CHEM 210 and CHEM 215. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The mechanistic underpinnings of key reactions in organic synthesis are discussed in the context of the primary literature.

CHEM 420. Intermediate Organic Chemistry
CHEM 215 and 216 or their equivalents. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

CHEM 436. Polymer Synthesis and Characterization
CHEM 260. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W odd years.

A lecture and laboratory course that introduces students to the special techniques used to study macromolecules.

CHEM 440 / BIOPHYS 440. Biophysics of Diseases
BIOPHYS 370 or CHEM 370 or PHYSICS 370. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course deconstructs current and emerging diseases in terms of the malfunctioning of nucleic acids, proteins, and membranes and the interactions between them. The diseases covered includes Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (or Mad-Cow disease), HIV, a variety of bacterial infections, and other biological disorders.

CHEM 447. Physical Methods of Analysis
CHEM 260 or 370 and 241/242. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W.

The course introduces the student to the principles and techniques of modern analytical chemistry. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chromatographic separation techniques are stressed. Some discussion of contemporary electrochemistry is included. The principles of data collection and the processing and representation of analytical signals are introduced.

CHEM 451 / BIOLCHEM 451. Advanced Biochemistry: Macromolecular Structure and Function
CHEM 215, 260, 351 and BIOLOGY 171 or 172. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

Taught from a chemical perspective with emphasis on understanding biochemical phenomena through chemical structure and mechanism, this course is intended for students pursuing the BS concentration in biochemistry. It provides an in-depth treatment of such topics as protein/nucleic acid structure, protein folding/stability, enzyme mechanisms/kinetics, bioenergetics/ photosynthesis, and the regulation of metabolic pathways.

CHEM 452 / BIOLCHEM 452. Advanced Biochemistry: Cellular Processes
CHEM 351 or MCDB 310 or BIOLCHEM 415, (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). Consent of instructor required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

This course focuses on the biochemistry of fundamental cellular processes. Topics include mechanisms for the integration of metabolism in both bacterial cells and in multicellular organisms, the process of gene expression focusing on the biochemistry of gene transcription, and mRNA translation. It generally emphasizes chemistry and enzymology of metabolic transformations, enzyme reaction mechanisms, and protein and nucleic acid structure and function.

CHEM 453. Biophysical Chemistry I: Thermodynamics and Kinetics
CHEM 260 (or CHEM 261 and CHEM 330), CHEM 451, PHYSICS 240, and MATH 215 or CHEM 262. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 463. F.

First in a two-semester Biophysical Chemistry sequence for biochemistry concentrators. Emphasis on topics and applications relevant to biochemistry and modern biophysical chemistry, building on CHEM 260. Rigorous mathematical theory of classical thermodynamics will be developed, including applications to entropy, heat engines, solution properties, and phase and chemical equilibrium. Modern statistical thermodynamics, modern theories of fundamental reaction rates and enzyme kinetics and molecular transport theories will be described and developed.

CHEM 454 / BIOPHYS 454. Biophysical Chemistry II: Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics
CHEM 453 or 463, and CHEM 451/452 or equivalent. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

This course builds on the CHEM 451-453 sequence and aims at providing an understanding of the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. After introducing the necessary nomenclature and reviewing thermodynamic principles, modern techniques to characterize the structure and dynamics of biopolymers will be the focus. Sedimentation, electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scattering, and spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence and NMR will be covered. Both physical principles and practical applications in the Life Sciences will be highlighted.

CHEM 455. Special Topics in Biochemistry - Nucleic Acids
CHEM 351, BIOLCHEM 415, MCDB 310 (or equivalent). (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will provide both a broad and deep overview of the structure, function and biology of both DNA and RNA. We will explore important examples from the current literature and the course content will evolve accordingly.

CHEM 461. Physical Chemistry I
CHEM 260 or 370 or BIOPHYS 370 or PHYSICS 370; and PHYSICS 240 or 235; and MATH 215 or CHEM 262. Should be elected concurrently with CHEM 462. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course provides an introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to chemistry. It is the second of a 3-term sequence in physical chemistry and builds on material introduced in CHEM 260. The Schrodinger Equation is solved in one, two, and three dimensions for important chemical problems. Group theory and quantum chemistry are used to understand chemical bonding and advanced spectroscopy.

CHEM 462. Computational Chemistry Laboratory
MATH 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 461. (1). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

CHEM 463. Physical Chemistry II
CHEM 461/462. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 453. W.

This is the third of a three-term sequence in physical chemistry and focuses on thermodynamics and kinetics. Both classical thermodynamics (entropy, phase, and chemical equilibrium) and statistical thermodynamics are discussed. Fundamental theories underlying chemical kinetics are discussed and solid state structures are introduced.

CHEM 467 / AOSS 467 / EARTH 465 / ENSCEN 467 / ENVIRON 467. Biogeochemical Cycles
MATH 116, CHEM 210, and PHYSICS 240 (or 260). (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W.

CHEM 482. Synthesis and Characterization
CHEM 215/216. Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 302 or CHEM 303. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to advanced techniques used in synthesis, purification, and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds.

CHEM 483. Advanced Methods in Physical Analysis
CHEM 447 and 461/462; and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 463. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores methods for the measurement of the physical and spectroscopic properties of substances and the application of these methods in instrumental analysis. The course is focused on essential laboratory principles and operations as they relate to the physicochemical properties of organic, inorganic, and macromolecular chemical species. Experiments study the areas of equilibria, chemical structure, chemical change, and computer simulation and calculation. Emphasis is placed on the effective design of experiments together with synergistic coupling of modern instrumentation and computers. The course includes literature searches for physical data. Laboratory reports constitute an important component of the course.

CHEM 495. Communication in the Natural Sciences
CHEM 461. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

This is a studio format course for students in the natural sciences that focuses on understanding the conventions, ethics and purposes of scientific communication. The course aims primarily to develop the skills of scientific writing and critical analysis. Other forms of scientific communication such as speaking and poster presentations will also be explored.

CHEM 498. Undergraduate Honors Thesis in Biochemistry
Consent of instructor required. CHEM 398 and permission of instructor. (1). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis.

To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis on undergraduate research.

CHEM 499. Undergraduate Thesis
Consent of instructor required. CHEM 399 and permission of instructor. (1). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. To be elected in the term in which an Honors student presents a thesis.

A course for students who present an undergraduate thesis as a result of research.

CHEM 507. Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM 461. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

CHEM 511 / MATSCIE 510. Materials Chemistry
CHEM 461, BIOLCHEM 415, CHEM 430; and permission of course director. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course presents concepts in materials chemistry. The main topics covered include structure and characterization, macroscopic properties and synthesis and processing.

CHEM 520 / BIOPHYS 520. Biophysical Chemistry I
CHEM 463, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 420; permission of course director. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is the first of a two term biophysical chemistry series BIOPHYS 520/521. The course offers an overview of protein, nucleic acid, lipid and carbohydrate structures.

CHEM 521 / BIOPHYS 521. Biophysical Chemistry II
CHEM 461, BIOLCHEM 415, and CHEM 430; and permission of course director. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course gives background applications of several physical techniques used in Biophysical research. General principles of spectroscopy will be explained. Macromolecular structure determination by X-ray diffraction and two-dimensional NMR will be treated in detail. IR, Raman, CD, EXAFS, EPR and ESEEM will be introduced.

CHEM 538 / MACROMOL 538. Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules
CHEM 215/216, and CHEM 230 or 260. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

CHEM 540. Organic Principles
CHEM 312 and 461. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

CHEM 541. Advanced Organic Chemistry
CHEM 540. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

CHEM 542. Applications of Physical Methods to Organic Chemistry
CHEM 260, 241/242, and 312. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Applications of infrared, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, optical rotary dispersion, mass spectrometry and other physical methods to the study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds.

CHEM 570. Molecular Physical Chemistry
(3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Basic concepts in modern chemical physics including molecular symmetry, group theory, operators, and introduction to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

CHEM 575. Chemical Thermodynamics
CHEM 461. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

CHEM 580. Molecular Spectra and Structure
CHEM 570 or permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

CHEM 673 / BIOLCHEM 673. Kinetics and Mechanism
BIOLCHEM 550, CHEMBIO 501, or equivalent, undergrad calculus. Physical Chemistry is recommended. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will cover the investigation of enzyme mechanisms with an emphasis on ligand binding to macromolecules, transient kinetics, steady-state kinetics, and inhibition. The kinetic and thermodynamic concepts that govern the action of enzymes will be explored.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2012 Regents of the University of Michigan