Undergraduate Course Catalog
Effective Term
Requirement or Grouping
Listings Per Page
Subject
  or   Department
Show Descriptions Show Course Guide Term Links For Past Two Years
Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
   Page 1 of 1, Results 1 - 69 of 69   
Courses in LSA Communication Studies

The mission of the Department of Communication Studies is to study and teach about the mass media and emerging media: their evolution, their effects, their uses by everyday people, and their regulation and industry practices. We are dedicated to cultivating thorough-going media literacy among our students, and to producing cutting-edge scholarship about the media’s impact on individuals and society.

Upper-Level Writing Requirement (ULWR)

Courses meeting the LSA Upper-Level Writing Requirement in Communication Studies are numbered COMM 350-399. Priority for seats in these courses is given to senior and junior majors.

Students enrolled in these courses must complete all writing assignments, regardless of whether or not they are seeking ULWR credit.

Quantitative Reasoning (QR) Requirement.

COMM 121 and 122 meet the Quantitative Reasoning requirement set by LSA and are required prerequisites to the major.

Undergraduate Internship: COMM 321

Communication Studies declared majors who have reached junior standing may receive some amount of experiential course credit for an internship. Students must have completed all four prerequisite courses (COMM 101, 102, 121, 122), with a 2.7 GPA or greater. Experiential credit is granted for work that takes place outside a university classroom, laboratory, library, or studio and is directly related to an academic discipline. In order to be approved for credit, internships must:

  1. involve systematic learning with demonstrated application of experience to the theory, concepts, or research methods of the field;
  2. be approved in advance by the faculty internship coordinator by the proposal deadline:(Summer - June 12; Fall - September 12; Winter - January 12); and
  3. result in a product (e.g., an analytical paper) that is evaluated as acceptable by the faculty internship coordinator.

Communication Studies majors learn of available internships through the University of Michigan's Career Center. Additional internship and professional career opportunities are provided through the Communication Studies Undergraduate CTools site and weekly e-mails.

Communication Studies (COMM)

In order to ensure that concentrators can enroll in required courses, up to 75% of spaces in many 300- and 400-level Communication Studies courses are reserved for declared concentrators. The remaining spaces are open for other students.

COMM 101. The Mass Media
First- and second-year students. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to the history and impact of mass media on American culture through advertising, news, radio, television programming, the Internet, and popular music. It reviews ideological, technological, and regulatory developments that produced our existing media system; and analytical tools and techniques that enhance media literacy. Topics include: media's role in shaping attitudes towards race, gender, sexuality and class; relationship between media and society; and language and skills for critically evaluating media's assumptions and techniques.

COMM 102. Media Processes and Effects
First- and second-year students. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Americans are immersed in the media like fish in water. The average adult spends two-thirds of his or her waking time consuming media, often more than one type at a time. Many people believe the media have little effect, but research shows they are wrong. This course describes the effects of media on thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors, and reasons why the media affect us. It includes review and evaluation of media research articles and participation in media research studies.

COMM 121. Quantitative Skills for Communication Studies
Freshman, sophomore or junior standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores basic principles of scientific research. Students explore different ways scientific studies are designed, quantitative data collection methods, and data analysis related to mass communication. We explore a variety of techniques and assess assumptions researchers make in these techniques. Students learn to recognize what can and cannot be concluded in our examinations. These skills will also help when encountering scientific information in real world settings.

COMM 122. Media Analysis: Concepts and Methods
Freshman, sophomore or junior standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys critical and qualitative methods commonly used to study media. Students explore both the practical aspects of developing studies using various methods as well as examine the strengths and weaknesses of specific methods for answering particular questions.

COMM 159. First-year Seminar in Media Issues
First-year students only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Credits do not count toward the Communication Studies major requirements.

Investigates issues and topics relevant to study of media and communication. Topics presented may include introduction and overview of media and culture, media and identity, media effects, and new, emerging media.

COMM 251 / SAC 324. Understanding Media Industries
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed COMM 351.

Understanding Media Industries examines the influence of media industry organization and practices on society while offering a comprehensive overview of how the industries work, why they work as they do, and the broader theoretical and practical implications of media industry operation.

COMM 261. Views on the News: What Shapes our Media Content
COMM 102 (completed with a minimum grade of C or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how various aspects of society shape the news. It is designed to offer a framework for thoughtful understanding of processes involved in the production, dissemination, and reception of mediated news content.

COMM 271. Communication Revolutions
COMM 101 (completed with a minimum grade of C or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the central role of technology in our culture, and the tension between technological devices and human users and developers; the link between communication, politics and power; the role of communications processes and technologies in marking the changing boundaries separating the public and private realms of life; the deep ties between trade, labor, transport, and communication technologies; the role of governmental and corporate institutions in influencing the uses of mediated communication in our society.

COMM 281. Media Psychology
COMM 102 (completed with a minimum grade of C or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

We discuss media effects research and theory with an emphasis on the social psychological processes that facilitate or inhibit media effects on individuals' attitudes, beliefs, emotions, and behaviors. We examine topics such as violence, advertising, stereotypes, news and politics, and fan culture, keeping in mind the role individual differences play in selective exposure to and reception of media messages. Outcomes include both positive and negative effects. Throughout, we will focus on the complexities of developing and executing media effects research.

COMM 305. Survey of Media Topics
COMM 101 and COMM 102 strongly recommended. (3 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Investigates the theoretical, analytical and historical aspects of media. Topics presented may include introduction and overview of media industries, media and culture, media and identity, media effects and new, emerging media. Topics vary by section.

COMM 310. Representation of Black Life and Culture in Global Perspective
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how people of African descent are represented outside of the United States. Taking Brazil, South Africa, and England as our locations, we probe the relationship between race, social change, and migration

COMM 313. Behind the Digital Screen
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides a look inside the technologies and infrastructures that make digital media function. Students investigate and manipulate code, formats, platforms, and networks in order to consider the relationship between these structures and the audio, visual, and interactive media representations that are possible.

COMM 316 / SI 316. Designing and Analyzing Social Media Feeds
May not be repeated for credit.

Social media, advertising, and computing often feature "feeds," -- a personalized list of changing items. This course considers the user experience of feeds, feed interaction design, feed business strategies, relevance algorithms, feed fiascoes, social feeds a data, and audience targeting -- all across the contexts of commerce, news, education, and expression.

COMM 317. Designing Persuasive Communication
COMM 261 or COMM 281 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed COMM 462 or MKT 411.

This course investigates the changes in business, technology, and design that are reshaping the words and images, the form and content of persuasive mass communication. It investigates emerging strategies for reaching global and regional audiences, discusses the impact of new technologies and media convergence, and examines the social and ethical issues that underlie persuasive strategies.

COMM 318 / PSYCH 318. Media and Violence
COMM 281 strongly recommended. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed COMM/PSYCH 481, Media & Violence (Crse ID #019987).

This course examines the psychological causes of aggressive violent behavior and the theoretical and empirical connections between violence in society and portrayals of violence in the mass media. It surveys the research on the physiological, psychological, and environmental factors implicated in the development of habitual aggressive and violent behavior and examines the theories that explain how exposure to violence in the mass media adds to the effects of these other factors causing aggressive and violent behavior.

COMM 321. Undergraduate Internship
Consent of instructor required. Junior standing, concentration in Communication Studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May not be used to satisfy Communication Studies electives in a Communication Studies major. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Provides limited credit for appropriate practical work experience. Student evaluation is based on satisfactory completion of the internship and written recommendation of the internship sponsor.

COMM 322. Faculty Directed Undergraduate Research Practicum
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Maximum of 3 credits from COMM 322 and/or COMM 441/442 may be used toward the Communication Studies concentration requirements. A maximum of three credits from COMM 322, 441, or 442 may be counted toward the concentration requirements.

This research practicum offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in mass communication or mass media within the context of a research setting. It provides experience and education in research techniques by having students conduct research with a faculty member on the faculty research projects. In the process, students learn the skills needed to conduct research, various research techniques, and the overall experience of analyzing outcomes. This course is intended as an intermediate step in the research educational process prior to students' own independently designed research in COMM 442 or honors research under COMM 491/492.

COMM 325. Media and Globalization
COMM 101 with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 251 strongly recommended. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers students a framework for exploring the media's role in processes of globalization and how the globalization of media shapes the socio-cultural, political, economic, ethical and moral dimensions of our lives in this world.

COMM 326 / AMCULT 326. American Magazines
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed AMCULT 250.

This class examines past and present magazines in the United States, and explores the way in which they provide a window into American history and the development of communications media. It includes both direct study of magazines themselves and secondary readings.

COMM 329 / POLSCI 329. Mass Media and Political Behavior
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Focuses on the role and importance of mass media in the political process. Topics include: how news is made; political advertising; relations between Congress, the President and the media; and the role of mass media in political campaigns. These topics are examined through a systematic review of research in both mass communication and political science.

COMM 334 / AMCULT 334 / SAC 334. Race, Gender, Sexuality and U.S. Culture in Video Games
(4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how video games function as a window into U.S. race relations. We will study the history, theory, and practice of video games in the U.S. with particular attention to racial stereotyping, user demographics, diversity of the industry, and racial conflict in shared world and social games.

COMM 350. The Rise and Demise of Mass Culture
COMM 101 with minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the ascent of commercial, mass-mediated culture in the United States. The digital transformation of media and communication invites us to reflect upon the history of mass media and communication synonymous with direct advertising and one-too-many broadcast media. This course gestures toward a sense that "mass culture" is not what it once was and asks what has emerged in its stead?

COMM 362. Digital Media Foundations
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This class is for those interested in practical skills and critical intellectual foundations relevant to the Internet and new media. Using context of Web-based applications, mobile applications, online multimedia, social media, and gaming, this course covers topics fundamental to understanding digital media forms, including an introduction to operation of the Web, Internet, Web development, search engines, digital formats, online media distribution platforms and networks, online communities, audiences, online advertising and user interfaces.

COMM 365. Visual Culture and Visual Literacy
COMM 101, with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines contemporary media, imaging technologies, and viewing practices through the lens of visual cultural studies. A wide range of media including television, film, photography, graphic design, advertising, video games, and websites are critically analyzed using approaches that draw from semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminist theory, and cultural studies.

COMM 371. Media, Culture, and Society
COMM 101 with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the historical rise of mass media and the impact on modern society and culture. It considers the dynamic impact of radio and television broadcasting on the rise of urban industrial mass society and popular commercial culture through music, print and electronic advertising, consumerism, and emergence of affluent society. The course also studies modern media institutions, politics, and forms and processes of social change and identity formation, such as class, ethnicity, gender, race, and sexuality.

COMM 380. Persuasion, Communication and Campaigns
COMM 102 with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course covers theories of persuasion, how to evaluate the effects of persuasive communication on individuals and groups, as well as the design and evaluation of persuasive communications. As an ULWR, the course also focuses heavily on developing strong, evidence-based arguments, and communicating those arguments clearly in writing.

COMM 404. Special Topics in Mass Media and Mass Communication
COMM 101 strongly recommended. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Investigates topics dealing with mass media and mass communication, media and culture, communication processes, media industries and new and emerging media. Topics vary by section.

COMM 405. Seminar in Mass Media and Mass Communication
COMM 101 strongly recommended. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Investigates topics dealing with mass media and mass communication, media and culture, communication processes, media industries and new and emerging media. Topics vary by section.

COMM 408. Special Topics in Media Effects
COMM 102 strongly recommended. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Investigates topics relating to research on the effects of mass communication. Topics vary by section.

COMM 409. Seminar in Media Effects
COMM 102 strongly recommended. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Investigates advanced topics relating to research on the effects of mass communication. Topics vary by section.

COMM 410. The Internet and Political Communication
COMM 102 and COMM 329 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores both the positive and negative democratic consequences of online political communication. Particular emphasis is placed on the various ways in which citizens are exposed to and engage news and political information online, the quality of that information, and its effects.

COMM 413 / ENVIRON 413. Environmental Communication
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice of environmental and science communication. Topics include media depiction's of environmental issues, the role of the media in influencing public opinion and policy actions, expert environmental communication by scientists and policy-makers, and theories that guide effective strategic environmental communication. We will engage with many of the critical environmental issues of our day, including climate change, fracking, support for renewable energy initiatives, and many more.

COMM 418. Designing Web Research
COMM 271 or COMM 315 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the creative and innovative world of mixed-methods online research employing web-based data collection strategies and social computing applications to investigate "internet phenomenon." This course also introduces students of communication studies to rigorous standards for evaluating online social research designs increasingly found across the industry and the academy.

COMM 419. Seminar in Research Methods
(COMM 121 and 122) or COMM 211 strongly recommended. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Investigates advanced topics in research design, measurement, or analysis. Topics will vary by section and may focus on qualitative and/or quantitative research methods.

COMM 421. Media Law and Policy
COMM 251 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed COMM 452.

This course covers the basic principles of the First Amendment and how they apply to media policy, practice, and regulation. Topics include First Amendment theory, hate speech, prior restraints and media censorship, defamation, indecency, obscenity, and advertising regulation.

COMM 423. Computer Mediated Communication
COMM 101 and COMM 102 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course investigates the role of computer-mediated communication (CMC) in modern life. The course explores various social contexts in which CMC plays a role. In addition, it reviews various branches of social theory that can be applied as lenses for viewing the social implications of CMC in our lives.

COMM 424. Race, Gender and New Media
COMM 271 and COMM 315 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course critically examines how ideology shapes the uses and design of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The readings have been selected to encourage reflection on ICTs in Western culture; particularly the influence and creation of racialized, gendered, sexualized, and class-based uses of new media.

COMM 425. Internet, Society and the Law
COMM 251 or COMM 271 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed COMM 466.

This course examines the development, regulation and impact of the Internet in American society. It focuses on the expanding legal implications of new technology and how judicial and political apparatus keep pace with the Internet's ever-expanding influence.

COMM 428. Gender, Media and the Law
Not available to students who have completed COMM 459 (crse ID#19977), Topic: Gender and Law (Topic #11). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 251 or COMM 271 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the legal system's treatment of gender through court cases and various theoretical lenses. The aim is to understand the role American jurisprudence plays in shaping society's views and ideas on gender, as well as society's influence on how the legal system frames these gender issues. The course also considers media and society responses to some of the most important decisions rendered in the gender equality arena, while weighing whether the court system is the most effective structure through which to pursue gender equality.

COMM 429 / WOMENSTD 429. Sexual Identities and the Media
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to some of the major debates about LGBTQ representation in the United States, including how gender, race, class, and economic factors shape how we understand sexuality and its representation. We look at both mainstream and alternative media to consider the role of LGBTQ producers and audiences in shaping queer images. This course asks students to look and think queerly -irrespective of sexual identification- through a series of creative assignments.

COMM 431. Supreme Court News Coverage
COMM 261 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy, examining the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student is expected to select one case from the current or past court term and study its media coverage in detail.

COMM 432. Foreign News Coverage
COMM 261 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course investigates coverage of foreign news as a reflection of the structure and function of media systems. What factors influence media decisions on event coverage? What criteria do the media use for deciding which to report? How successfully do the media make foreign news relevant to American audiences? What special problems do foreign correspondents face?

COMM 435. News Media Ethics
COMM 261 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on problems in news media ethics and provides an historic overview of traditional journalistic ethics coupled with a detailed study of changing values in news media coverage. It studies journalists' responsibilities to their profession and to the public, and examines proposed solutions to the problems of news media ethics violations.

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance
COMM 261 strongly recommended. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Investigates long-range factors affecting the ability of the news media to perform their functions in a democratic society. Topics vary by section.

COMM 440. Global Iconic Events
COMM 101 with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the media coverage of news events that have attracted large international audiences. These exceptional events interrupt the flow of time, and provide us with uplifting or traumatic experiences. The case studies include the Royal Wedding, the Beijing Olympic Games, the September 11 attacks, and others.

COMM 441. Independent Reading
Consent of department required. (3 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. A maximum of 3 credits from COMM 322 and/or COMM 441/442 may be used toward the Communication Studies major requirements. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the department.

COMM 442. Independent Research
Consent of department required. (3 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits. A maximum of 3 credits from COMM 322 and/or COMM 441/442 may be used toward the Communication Studies major requirements. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with the faculty member and approved by the department.

COMM 443. LA, Bombay, Hong Kong: Cultural Industries in Transition
COMM 325 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses attention on the operations, discourses, and logics that drive contemporary media industries in three major media capitals: L.A., Hong Kong and Mumbai (Bombay).

COMM 445. Music and Mediated Identities
COMM 101 (completed with a minimum grade of C or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 350 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Can the analysis of music help us better understand the modern world, consumerism, technology, and mediated communication? To answer this question, this course draws on social and cultural history, theory, and media studies to examine popular music and identity formation in America from the late nineteenth century to the present.

COMM 446. Reality and Television
Not available to students who have completed COMM 468 (crse ID #022063), Topic: Television and Reality, (Topic #12). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course explores what is meant by the 'real world', 'real life', and 'real people' and the ways in which they are presented in different genres of TV output. How does television work to produce effects of 'the real'? Can we, do we believe what we see--and why?

COMM 447. Women and Islam: The Politics of Representation
COMM 371 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores past and present constructions of women in Islam, including study of the foundations of contemporary thinking around Islam and gender, the sociology of religious and gender identity, and the political stakes of representations of the Muslim woman, with attention to the consequences of media representation and stereotyping.

COMM 455. Global Visual Cultures
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 371 or COMM 365 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits from Comm 450-490.

This CAPSTONE seminar examines the transnational flows of visual media. We survey the literature of visual culture in multiple disciplines, while considering how images travel across cultural boundaries. The course raises the questions of which visuals do and do not resonate with international audiences, and why certain visual resonate more than others.

COMM 457. Citizenship after Television
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 251 or COMM 271 strongly recommended. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

This course explores how television serves as a crucial site for struggles over citizenship and questions of inclusion (and exclusion) in the nation. We trace television's role in shaping post-war American culture by relating TV to broader debates surrounding class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion.

COMM 460. History of Technology and Modern Culture
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 271 or COMM 350 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the cultural history of technology and communication by tracing the emergence of, and reception to, selected technologies from the 19th century to the present. It pays critical attention to unique and recurring problems and opportunities associated with communication and technical innovation in the modern world.

COMM 461. Visuality and the New Media
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 365 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits from Comm 450-490.

This course explores the intersection between digital media and "the visual" from historical, theoretical, and industrial perspectives. We trace changes in how the "user" is imagined from 1960s mainframe computers to today's popular social apps, developing analytical techniques for the visual analysis of new media cultural forms.

COMM 463. Communication and Political Representation
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 261 and COMM 329 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits from COMM 450-490.

It is hard to imagine modern representative democracy without mass media. This capstone seminar looks at the roles that mass media play in citizen-government relations: as a source of information about policies and governments; as a representation of citizens' attitudes and preferences; and as centerpiece of election campaigns. Discussions will focus on where mass media succeed and fail, and on the consequences of media performance for political decision-making and the functioning of representative democracy.

COMM 464. Social Consequences of Mobile Communication
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 251 and COMM 261 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

This course examines the social consequences of mobile communication and the role that mobile communication technology plays in the reformulation of everyday life. It explores adoption patterns, international perspectives on mobile communication, intersections between mass and interpersonal communication, and theoretical approaches.

COMM 465. Health Communication and Health Behavior Change
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 281 or 380 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

Examines principles related to health communication, including contemporary theories of health behavior change, approaches to the design and development of health communications, and principles and practices of outcome evaluation. Sample topics include: health promotion, social marketing, risk communication, fear appeals, entertainment-education, and health messages in the popular media.

COMM 466. Global Digital Politics
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 325 OR COMM 329 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits from Comm 450-490.

This Capstone seminar explores the myriad and interconnected ways in which digital media and internet infrastructure are shaping and constraining participation and organizing in world politics. The course also introduces students of communication studies to international affairs and comparative inquiry, with rich case studies and current events from around the globe.

COMM 468. Political Misinformation and Misperceptions
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 329 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

Inaccurate beliefs about politics are prevalent in America and held about a range of political issues and politicians. Once they take hold, misperceptions are often difficult to correct and can impact democratic outcomes. This CAPSTONE seminar explores several factors that contribute to the spread of political misinformation and the rise of misperceptions, including the roles of media, social networks, and psychological biases. The course also examines the consequences of inaccurate political beliefs and investigates various communication strategies and media campaigns utilized to correct misperceptions.

COMM 469. Play and Technology
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits from Comm 450-490.

This capstone seminar investigates competing social scientific and philosophical theories of play, the structure of games, and the consequences of technologically mediated play for both children and adults. It is organized around competing theoretical understandings of play and is illustrated with examples from computer games.

COMM 470. Telling Our Own Stories: Minority Self-Representation in the Media
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 371 strongly recommended. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

This course explores media narratives and representations of identity and culture told from a minority point of view, considering questions of race/ethnicity, sexuality and gender. The course examines how these media stories are told, what topics/issues they address, and what alternative views of American identity and society they provide.

COMM 477. The Mass Media and Celebrity Culture
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits from COMM 450-490.

This course examines the explosive rise of celebrity culture since the mid-1970s and its colonization of virtually every media form and genre, from niche cable channels to the news to the proliferation of celebrity journalism and magazines in the early 21st century. It explores the mass media's need for, and role in the manufacture, maintenance and expansion of celebrity culture in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, and considers the consequences of that culture on the media themselves and American culture. Readings focus on theories of celebrity, the history of celebrity production, and the ideological work done by celebrity culture.

COMM 482. Children and the Media
Declared Communication Studies Seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 281 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

Examines influences of the mass media on children in society. The course is designed to explore in-depth the literature on media effects, emphasizing the interaction of mass media, psychological development, and social behavior. Course readings examine both methodological and theoretical issues, drawing from work in communication, psychology, and policy studies.

COMM 483. Media and Intergroup Conflict
Declared Communication Studies seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 281 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits from COMM 450-490.

This capstone seminar explores theory and research on mass media and its influence on intergroup relations involving different racial, ethnic, and religious groups. It focuses on basic social psychological explanations of stereotypes, prejudice, and intergroup conflict as well as theories explaining how media can influence intergroup conflict.

COMM 487. African Americans in Popular Culture
Declared Communication Studies Seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 371 strongly recommended. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

This course draws upon diverse literatures as a blue-print to the construction of Black identity in (mediated) popular culture. We delve into debates of race, representation, and participation by examining how African American life and culture - "Blackness" - is presented in popular communication.

COMM 490. Capstone Seminars in Media Topics
Declared Communication Studies Seniors ONLY. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) COMM 251, COMM 261, COMM 271 or COMM 281 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits can be elected from COMM 450-490.

Investigates advanced senior capstone topics relating to mass media and mass communication. Topics vary by section.

COMM 491. Senior Honors Seminar I
Consent of instructor required. Admission to Honors Program. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits of COMM 491-492 may be included in a Communication concentration plan. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (COMM 492), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

This is the first in a two-part honors seminar program and culminates in the composition of a senior honors thesis prospectus. Develops student's senior honors thesis topic, choice of research methods, and selection of faculty thesis adviser.

COMM 492. Senior Honors Thesis
Consent of instructor required. COMM 491 and permission of instructor. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. No more than three credits of COMM 491-492 may be included in a communication studies concentration plan.

The second in a two-part honors seminar program and culminates in the composition of a senior honors thesis. Students must have successfully completed COMM 491. Students work directly with their thesis advisers, and are expected to meet regularly with them for direction and assistance.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2012 Regents of the University of Michigan