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Courses in LSA English Language Institute

The English Language Institute offers instruction in academic English to international students enrolled in the University. The main purpose of this instruction is to help non-native speakers to become effective and fully participating members of the academic community. For this reason, the majority of the ELI courses are primarily concerned with English for Academic Purposes. Most of these courses address specific areas such as pronunciation, lecture comprehension, or academic grammar and usually involve no more than 20 contact hours per term. In major areas such as speaking and writing, a sequence of courses of increasing difficulty and specialization is available.

A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

English Language Institute (ELI)
ELI 300. Writing and Grammar in Academic Contexts
Consent of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

Designed for graduate and undergraduate non-native speakers. The course focuses on the organization and grammatical accuracy of academic prose. Grammatical emphasis will be on article usage, appropriate tense choice, coherence, and nominalization.

ELI 312. Spoken and Written Grammar in Academic Contexts
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 320. Writing for Academic Purposes I
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 321. Writing for Academic Purposes II
Consent of instructor required. Placement based upon performance in ELI 320 or the Academic English Evaluation (AEE). (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 330. Language and Communication I
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 332. Lecture Comprehension
(1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 333. Interactive Listening and Communication
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 334. Presenting in Academic Contexts
(3). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

Designed for non-native speakers, this course focuses on verbal skills within an academic context. The emphasis is on the organization, style, and language of oral presentations relevant to the classroom and professional conferences. Students receive practice in producing effective and clear presentations, planning discussion and seminar strategies, and developing techniques for criticism by peers and self.

ELI 336. Pronunciation I
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 337. Pronunciation II
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 338. Pronunciation in Context
Consent of instructor required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

ELI 351 / LING 351 / PSYCH 344. Second Language Acquisition
LING 111 or 210. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an introductory course in Second Language Acquisition (SLA). How adults learn, or fail to learn, a second language is a fascinating question. It involves much of what we know about human cognition, psychology, and language. How best to help learners acquire a second language is an equally important educational issue. In addition to all of the factors which play a role in child language acquisition, SLA also involves effects of variation in second language educational, social and usage environments, ages of acquisition, levels of learner cognitive and brain development, motivation, and language transfer.

ELI 372. Academic Words and Their Patterns
(3). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

This course is designed to improve students? understanding and use of university-level vocabulary and discourse. Through the introduction of internet-based resources students will expand their use of general academic and specialist terminology and phrases. The class focuses on essential vocabulary and collocations in spoken and written texts.

ELI 380. Introduction to Graduate Student Instructor Work
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Designed for potential GSIs; consists of classroom, workshop and intensive critiquing elements to provide background in American classroom culture and pedagogical techniques, and to provide practice and awareness in comprehension and production of classroom, lab and office hour discourse and communicative acts necessary for effective instruction.

ELI 381. GSI Communication Skills
Consent of instructor required. GSI screening and permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ELI 390 / EDUC 390 / LING 386 / RCSSCI 390. Community Service and Language, Education, and Culture
(1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected three times for credit.

This course offers a service learning experience for undergraduates in the multilingual, multicultural context of the migrant population. The course may vary in terms of the content and target population, e.g. the course may focus on literacy issues, critical pedagogy or cultural identity issues but within the context of linguistic, educational and cultural needs of minority populations.

ELI 391. English as a Second Language Topics
(3; 3 - 4 in the half-term). May be elected twice for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

Special courses arranged for undergraduates (native or non-native speakers) preparing to teach English as a second language in other countries. Courses will focus especially on cultural and educational aspects of teaching ESL that may be problematic for the international community. Variable format.

ELI 392. Topics in English for Non-native Speakers
Consent of instructor required. (2). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

Special courses arranged for selected non-native speakers in particular classes, departments, schools, or colleges. These courses concentrate on aspects of an educational culture problematic for non-native speakers. The format of these courses, scheduling, and patterns of assessment will vary according to circumstance.

ELI 399. Individual Research and Study
Permission of Instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree.

Students will pursue individual research on a wide variety of topics related to second language acquisition, teaching or learning. Research projects would be completed done under the supervision of ELI faculty, who should be consulted as to possible topics or ongoing projects in which students could participate.

ELI 420. Research Paper Writing
(2). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This is an advanced writing course for international Master's and Ph.D. students, who learn to formulate a hypothesis, synthesize material from written sources, organize ideas, and develop arguments. They investigate writing conventions in their respective fields, work on incorporating devices to improve flow and coherence of writing, and learn the grammar and semantics of academic writing.

ELI 434. Discussion and Oral Argumentation
Consent of instructor required. Non-native English speaker; advanced Graduate standing, and permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This advanced oral communication course is a seminar that focuses on how to help listeners better understand what you are saying. Students learn how to organize information effectively and how to give oral presentations. Students study elements of effective oral communication, examine how they are used in recorded video samples and adapt them to personal use.

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