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Courses in LSA History of Art

History of Art examines the wide range of things that humanity has made and looked at and endowed with meaning – from the imposing facade of an imperial palace, to the colorful glory of stained glass or oil painting, to an artist’s intimate sketches. The discipline encompasses the study of painting, sculpture, the graphic media, and architecture, as well as an extensive variety of visual forms produced for purposes that run far afield of the traditional territory of “art” itself (advertising, say, or ritual and ceremony, or popular entertainment).

Students become conversant with the world’s cultures and develop skills in visual analysis in order to understand how images, objects and built environments communicate. They also learn to employ a broad selection of interpretive methodologies. Through careful work with original sources and a wide-ranging study of comparative cultures, our students learn to consider how art objects were understood in their own time and place, and how they continue to function in the contemporary world. In doing so, history of art students become acute observers and interpreters of the visual environment.

History of Art (HISTART)
HISTART 100. Introduction to Art
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This is a gateway course to the history of art, providing basic skills and perspectives one can bring to the interpretation of art. Issues discussed include art production, the challenge of representation, art and religion, and the problem of valuation.

HISTART 101. Great Monuments from the Stone Age to the Middle Ages
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course explores selected great monuments such as: magic-charged cave art of prehistory; fabled wonders of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome; medieval Christian, Jewish, and Islamic visions of piety and power. In different ways, all express intersections of nature and cosmos; spirituality, social identity, and authority.

HISTART 102. Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. W.

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. May not be used to meet the prerequisite requirement for the History of Art major.

HISTART 205. Sacred Places
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces a sampling of significant sacred sites, shrines, and artworks throughout the world. These holy places are examined in terms of the festivals and religions with which they are associated, including ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman religions, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism.

HISTART 208 / AAS 208. Introduction to African Art
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This class investigates several pivotal issues and lie behind the surfaces of some extraordinary objects and practices of a selected group of African and African Diaspora cultures. Students learn how to see and understand a wide range of African visual practices. Topics include architecture, textiles, body adornment, painting, graphic communication systems, photography, dance, ritual performance and sculpture. Such practices continue to unfold on the African continent as people are transformed and endure in the African Diaspora.

HISTART 210. History of Photography
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of the history of photography tracing its technical and aesthetic development, related to the other arts and the social context in which it evolved.

HISTART 212 / ARCH 212. Understanding Architecture
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Not open to students enrolled in Architecture. W.

HISTART 213 / ARCH 213. Buildings, Cities, and People
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This is a survey course on modern architecture in relation to other modernist discourses in the 19th and 20th centuries.

HISTART 220 / CLARCH 220. Great Buildings of Ancient Greece and Rome
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Architecture provides a unique perspective on classical civilization. Buildings such as the Parthenon and the Colosseum are marvels of both engineering and design, and they still have great expressive power. This course introduces students to key monuments of Greek and Roman architecture from prehistoric to early mediaeval times.

HISTART 221 / CLARCH 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The archaeology of Crete and Greece to the age of Alexander and the contributions made to the history of civilization through excavation.

HISTART 222 / CLARCH 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 224 / AAS 224. African Visual Cultures: Akan/Kongo/Yoruba
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces a broad range of perspectives on African visual cultures by focusing on three cultural groups: the Akan, the Yoruba and the Kongo. Lecture and discussion topics are thematic and cross-cultural, examining the visual image in contexts before, during, and after European colonialism as well as in Diasporic transformations.

HISTART 230 / AMCULT 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture/discussion class surveys painting, sculpture, architecture, and the visual and material culture of everyday life. It examines the impact of industrialization, Westward expansion, international art movements, and the rise of middle-class taste. Assignments include museum visits, readings in historical sources and recent critical interpretations, and original research.

HISTART 237 / AMCULT 237 / RCHUMS 237. On the Margins of the Art World - Self-Taught Artists in the U.S.
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys a broad range of artists variously known as "Outsider", "Self-Taught", or "Folk" artists. In addition to exploring these artists' work, this course explores boundaries between Fine Art and other creative practices, and explores broader issues regarding creativity, marginality, art, and culture.

HISTART 240 / MEMS 240. The Visual Arts in Medieval Society
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A study of masterworks of medieval art in relation to society, environment, technology, and literature and as an expression of a phase in the development of the moral and intellectual ideas of the western world. Emphasis is on the fortress, the castle, the city, the cathedral, the abbey, and the book. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by museum trips and by readings in medieval epic, romance, and general history in addition to more specialized studies in the history of art.

HISTART 243 / ASIAN 243. Introduction to South Asian Art
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the arts of South Asia, from the earliest remains of Indus Valley civilization through the contemporary period.

HISTART 244. Art of the American Century (1893-1968)
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Where did our modern, highly visual environment come from? This class examines such well-known Americans as Frank Lloyd Wright and Georgia O'Keefe, along with photographers and artists of color who contributed to American modernism. We also study the commercial culture (from cartoons to Tupperware) that shaped their everyday world.

HISTART 250 / MEMS 250. Italian Renaissance Art
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the principal monuments of Italian Renaissance Art: Giotto's Arena Chapel, Botticelli's Birth of Venus, Michelangelo's David and Sistine Chapel Ceiling, and Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa.

HISTART 254 / WOMENSTD 254. Introduction to Gender and the Arts
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to gender issues in a range of art forms: literature, music, theater, film, dance, and visual arts. We consider how performances of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality intersect with race, class, and ethnicity. Then we think about how these issues are produced and received by artists and audiences in the past and present.

HISTART 255. Visual Mythology
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the "afterlife" of classical mythologies by focusing on the classical revival of the Renaissance. It also studies the intersection of these traditions with contemporary representations, chiefly in film. The course familiarizes students with core myths from Ovid's Metamorphoses, and themes like transformation, desire, and creativity.

HISTART 260. European Painting and Sculpture of the Seventeenth Century
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The art of the seventeenth century as embodied in the work of its greatest masters: Rembrandt, Vermeer, Caravaggio, Bernini, Rubens, Poussin, and Velazquez. An attempt is made to define both the panoramic variety and underlying philosophical unity of the Baroque Age.

HISTART 271 / FRENCH 241. Origins of Modernism: Art and Culture in Nineteenth Century France
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, state-sponsored form of Classicism to the succession of movements that emerged in opposition to official art. The course is also designed to encourage close readings of images within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debates.

HISTART 272 / RCHUMS 272. Modern Art: Avant-Garde to Contemporary
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the work of major 20th century European and American artists with a focus on two fundamental issues. First, we consider the way in which avant-garde artists have repeatedly interrogated the nature of signification itself, or in other words, how form produces meaning. Second, we explore the avant-garde's ambitious but theoretically controversial relationship to revolutionary politics. The course is designed to help students develop the vocabulary as well as analytical and visual tools necessary in dealing with the great diversity of works and critical debates that constitute the history of 20th century art.

HISTART 285 / AAPTIS 285. Visual Culture Islam
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

We survey the arts in the Islamic world from Spain to India, 7th-19th centuries. Students study a limited selection of architectural monuments and luxury arts (books, paintings, objects) in light of the art historical and socio-economic parameters of their production and consumption. The visual culture also anchors our study of the spiritual and intellectual values of Islam and the formation and development of its distinctive culture idioms.

HISTART 286. Art and Empire in Antiquity
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the ways in which visual art works as a tool of imperial persuasion, ambition, and legitimization. It focuses on hallmark monuments of ancient Egypt, Iraq, and Iran, with telling comparative glimpses of Classical Athens, early imperial Rome, the Soviet Union, and the United States.

HISTART 290 / ANTHRCUL 209. Ethnicity and Art in Japan
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This multimedia course on Japan explores how "race" and ethnicity are defined and given artistic, including musical, expression by a variety of groups past and present.

HISTART 292 / ASIAN 292. Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HISTART 495.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the history of Japanese visual culture, introducing the art of the archipelago from ancient times through the present day. Although primarily a chronological examination of key artistic monuments, it also discusses thematic issues in Japanese art history, such as nature, gender, and modernity.

HISTART 299. Experiential Study
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. This course is not intended for students who are pursuing research. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is intended for students who wish to receive credit for an internship or other experiential work under the direction of a member of the faculty. This course is not intended for students who are pursuing research.

HISTART 301 / ENVIRON 301. Nature, Culture and Landscape
Junior/Senior/permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. W.

This course examines human landscape interventions throughout Western history within a series of spatial archetypes that embody various layers of the human/nature dialectic. Focus is on the interplay of cultural beliefs, values, social realities and artistic expressions within the medium of landscape and their impact in contemporary environmental perception.

HISTART 302 / ANTHRCUL 302 / WOMENSTD 302. Sex and Gender in Japan
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Explore attribution and construction of gender in Japan historically and in the present time.

HISTART 304 / ASIAN 304. The Art of Yoga
(4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

As yoga becomes increasingly popular it is important to query its early development, transformation over the centuries, and the possibilities and perils that it holds forth to its practitioners. Graphing milestones in the history of yoga, this course is also an introduction to South Asian visual, literary, and religious culture.

HISTART 306. Exhibiting Mesopotamia
Consent of instructor required. HISTART 101. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the ancient civilizations of Iraq and neighboring western Iran in a unique, challenging, and creative way. Students participate in the real-time designing of a new installation of Mesopotamian art and archaeology (with accompanying didactic material) for the new wing of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

HISTART 323 / HISTORY 350 / HJCS 323 / JUDAIC 323 / RELIGION 324. History of Jewish Visual Culture: From Ancient Mosaics to Jew-Hop Videos
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces art and images from ancient Israel through contemporary Jewish American and Israeli art and popular visual culture. Can art be Jewish? What of the supposed prohibition against idolatry? How do Jewish attitudes about arts and the ways of making it change across time and space?

HISTART 334 / WOMENSTD 334. Women in the Visual Arts: Images and Image-Makers
One course in Women's Studies or History of Art. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The course studies women as both image-makers and role-players in the visual arts, examining their histories from the mid-18th to the beginning of the 20th century. It offers an introduction to how meanings about women and gender are produced through visual representation and how gender structures critical writing on art.

HISTART 338. Representing Fashion: Costume and Dress in the Visual Arts
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The course explores representations of fashion and costume in art and visual culture of early modern and modern Europe, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We pay particular attention to the conventions of visual representation in images of fashion and costume, from fine art painting to journal illustration and photography, thus allowing these images to operate in different registers.

HISTART 341. The Gothic Age
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

During the 13th and 14th centuries, Paris was pre-eminent in the arts. Parisian artisans created trendsetting works of art that exerted an influence in all parts of Europe. This course is devoted to reconstructing the medieval city and becoming acquainted with surviving architectural monuments.

HISTART 342 / RCHUMS 344. Reason and Passion in the 18th Century
Sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Thie course examines significant works of visual art, literature, and philosophy created in Europe and the American colonies in the eighteenth century in light of the questions "what is a person?" and "what is the relation of the individual to society?"

HISTART 344 / MEMS 344. Early Medieval Kingdoms and Cultures: European Art 400-1000
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course treats that period in European history, when, after the fall of Rome, waves of invading "barbarians" occupied the lands of the former empire and, as a product of dynamic interchange between cultures over time, new forms of art and architecture emerged. Cultural historical in orientation, the focus will be on functions of imagery in early medieval societies.

HISTART 348 / MEMS 348. The Medieval Book
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on an art form highly developed in the Middle Ages: the richly illuminated hand-written book. Students come to know such masterworks as the Lindisfarne Gospels and the Tres Riches Heures as they are learned about significant episodes in the history of manuscript production, beginning with the invention of the codex in late antiquity and ending with the advent of the printed book in the early modern era.

HISTART 351. The Art and Poetry of Michelangelo
HISTART 102 or 251. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An intensive study of Michelangelo's visual art and poetry designed to introduce Renaissance theories of style and invention while focusing on the artist's preoccupation with the body as a source of visual and verbal metaphors.

HISTART 352. Art and Philosophy in the Renaissance Tradition
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar explores fundamental philosophical and moral issues in European visual art and writing about art from the early modern period (c. 1400-1780). Students learn to unpack the ideas and intellectual agendas of both natural philosophy (science) and moral philosophy (ethics) in several visual and literary genres.

HISTART 354 / ANTHRCUL 354. Art, Science, and Technology
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This multimedia, interdisciplinary seminar is devoted to exploring the global history and present-day expressions of the relationship between art, science, and technology, and how they are integrated. To this end we will cultivate both a new visual literacy and a new literacy in science and technology.

HISTART 355 / MEMS 355. The Miraculous and the Diabolical in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we investigate 'supernatural' phenomena in the visual arts: divine acts, miracles, magic, and sorcery. We are interested in how and why people in late medieval and early modern Europe distinguished between the 'supernatural' and the 'natural', as well as the extreme fluidity of these terms.

HISTART 362 / AAS 362. Expressive Cultures of the Black Atlantic: Vision and Time
HISTART 208/AAS 208 and upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course addresses a diversity of Black Atlantic visual cultures, both in Africa and in the Diaspora, with a focus on how historical memory and the experience of the passage of time are articulated in objects and performances.

HISTART 376. Dada and Surrealism
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 382 / ACABS 382 / ANTHRARC 381. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 BCE-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

HISTART 383. Modern Asian Art
At least one course in either History of Art or Asian Studies. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course discusses modern art in Asia (construed in this context as the countries comprising East, Southeast, and South Asia) as a function of the encounter between groups identified primarily on the basis of their racial and ethnic origin. Beginning from roughly the late 18th century, this course explores constructs of race and ethnicity through visual representation.

HISTART 385. Human Rights in China from Classical Times through the 18th Century: a Historical and Cultural Survey
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys debates relevant to human rights issues in China up through the Eighteenth-century. Apart from secondary readings, it focuses on primary sources, including visual art, poetry, essays, or official documents, to illustrate how issues of equality, justice, or freedom of speech were understood and contested in China.

HISTART 386. Painting and Poetry in China
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to explore word and image issues and at the same time introduce those genres of Chinese painting most directly affected by traditional Chinese literary theory.

HISTART 388. Norm and Storm: Rebellion in Art
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the meaning of "rebellion," or oppositional practices, in artistic traditions outside Europe and America. It seeks to explore the ways in which the makers and consumers of art have questioned, contested, subverted, and negotiated visual and cultural "norm."

HISTART 389 / CLARCH 389. Pompeii
CLARCH 222/HISTART 222. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course uncovers the urban fabric of Pompeii: how it was laid out, public and private buildings and their decoration, and the wider cultural, geographical and historical contexts. Using physical remains alongside texts in translation, we explore different aspects of the lives of the inhabitants, together with the enduring power of the city to dominate our modern view of the Roman world.

HISTART 392. Anime to Zen: Japanese Art through Contemporary Popular Culture
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines examples of a wide variety of Japanese films, photography, painting, sculpture, comics, and new media to illuminate ideas about nature and place, personal and national identity, fantasy and virtual realities, humanity and its borders, beauty and ugliness, violence and war, the body, gender, sex, and consumption.

HISTART 393. Junior Proseminar
Consent of instructor required. Concentration in History of Art and upperclass standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit. W.

Discussion of the general theme in the history of the fine arts which will introduce the students to problems of methodology and historiography.

HISTART 394. Special Topics
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. F, W, Sp, Su.

The areas covered vary from term to term in relation to the interests and specialization of the instructor.

HISTART 397. Interdisciplinary Topics in History of Art
(3). (ID). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course fulfills LSA ID credit requirements. The areas covered will vary from term to term in relation to the interest and specialization of the instructor.

HISTART 399. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Undergraduate students may work independently with a faculty member from the department of the History of Art.

HISTART 406 / AAS 407. Looking at African Things
HISTART 208/AAS 208. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the shifting historical terms and narratives that constitute and justify the creation, display and reception of African object, both in and out of Africa, in such contexts as museums, photographic archives, world's fairs, theme parks and other cultural spectacles.

HISTART 408 / AAS 480. Visual Culture as History in Africa
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Employing the analytical and interpretive methods of art history, archaeology, and history, this course examines artifacts and architecture from a number of African societies as historical "documents" of the past, and also as agents of social, political, religious, and economic processes that were used to shape the histories of these societies.

HISTART 422 / CLARCH 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of the architecture, sculpture and painting of the Etruscans with special reference to Greek (and other) influences and the Etruscan impact on Rome.

HISTART 424 / CLARCH 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 430 / CLARCH 420. Greece before History: The Art and Archaeology of Greek Lands ca 3500 to 700 BCE
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the origins, character and collapse of complex societies of the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean. Sources of evidence include architecture, artifacts, mortuary practices and the distribution of sites within the wider landscape. We also explore recent work on documentary sources, including the linear B (Mycenean) tablets.

HISTART 433 / CLARCH 433. Greek Sculpture
Upperclass standing, some preparation in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology or History of Art. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

History of Greek sculpture from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE. Treats free-standing statuary and relief and architectural sculpture in stone, bronze, terracotta, and gold and ivory. Examines evolving functions of Greek sculpture, and relationships between stylistic development and social and political change.

HISTART 435 / CLARCH 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 439 / CLARCH 439. Greek Vase Painting
Upperclass standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 440 / CLARCH 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 443 / CLARCH 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization
Upperclass standing and CLARCH/HISTART 221. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The 8th and 7th centuries saw Greeks migrating from their home cities and countrysides to new settlements in many corners of the Mediterranean world. The course explores the art and archaeology of their colonization. They went South to Egypt and Libya, North to unoccupied tracts of Thrace, yet further North to explore the coasts of the Black Sea and its hinterland, and as far West as France and Spain. The most thoroughgoing of these new settlements were perhaps in Sicily and South Italy where new Greek cities came to rival the cities of their motherland in size, power, splendor and wealth.

HISTART 460. Renaissance Architecture
HISTART 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The course examines the architecture of the Renaissance--the buildings and cities of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy, France, and England.

HISTART 463. Art and Visual Culture in the Dutch Golden Age
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the role of the pictorial arts in the making of the Dutch Republic. It considers painting, drawing, prints, maps, book illustrations and the range of pictorial technologies that constituted Dutch visual culture in the seventeenth century, and generated new ways of seeing and understanding the world.

HISTART 465. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany
Upperclass standing and HISTART 102. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The architectural forms and complexes of baroque Rome, Turin, and Vienna and their final flowering in the churches and palaces of southern Germany in late 18th century.

HISTART 469 / ASIAN 469. Modern Chinese Visual Culture
ASIAN 261. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the changing visual experiences and expressions in China from the early twentieth century to the present. A range of visual materials will be studied. We will also consider studies of and theories about visual culture from other contexts and why visual culture is fundamental to Chinese modernity.

HISTART 474. Topics in Modern and Contemporary Architecture
Any 100- or 200-level course in art history or architecture. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

An upper-level seminar on special topics in modern and contemporary architecture.

HISTART 475. America Builds: Architecture and the Built Environment from the Civil War to the Present
HISTART 213 or similar. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This 400-level lecture course surveys the history of American architecture and cities from the Civil War to the present. It focuses on buildings, infrastructure, the public reception of architecture, and the urban frame in which buildings interact with one another and their users.

HISTART 479 / AMCULT 479. The Arts in American Life
Prior coursework in History of Art or American Culture or American History; and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

A focused, critical examination of the relation of art, architecture, and material objects to specific problems in American culture and history. (Topics and subtitles vary).

HISTART 480. Disney's Lands: Consuming Wonders in America
Consent of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the Disney parks from several vantage points, focusing on individual themed lands within them to address broader fields of historical representation. They include the depiction of the American Frontier, colonialist Adventure, childhood Fantasy, and utopian Tomorrow. Readings are interdisciplinary. Planned field trips include a required 3-day visit to Disneyland in Florida.

HISTART 481 / CLARCH 481. Art of Ancient Iran
Upperclass standing and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture
(1 - 3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics of this course vary depending upon the special interest of faculty and opportunities that arise to enrich the curriculum in particular ways. The particular topic in each case will be indicated by a subtitle.

HISTART 490. Working with Objects: Islamic Textiles, Metalwork, Ceramics, Glass, and Coins
HISTART 285. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This seminar introduces students to the social, cultural, and religious history of Islamic art through a selection of objects held in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Objects that will be studied and examined hands-on in the museum include Islamic ceramics, glasswares, metalwares, coins, amulets, textiles, manuscripts, and calligraphies.

HISTART 494. Encounters with Islamic Art: Studying, Collecting, and Reviving
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course addresses Islamic art of the pre-modern period along with its scholarly reception, collection, and revival during the 19th and 20th centuries. It explores the many ways in which collectors, scholars, artists, and architects have encountered Islamic artistic traditions during the modern period. It aims to highlight how Islamic art -as a constructed scholarly discipline and corpus of selected objects- must be considered a global phenomenon that has been constructed through the efforts of various artistic entrepreneurs at the same time as it has been entangled in the cultural politics of Colonialism, Orientalism, and globalization over the course of the past two centuries.

HISTART 495 / ASIAN 494. Ocean of Stories: Telling Tales in the Indian Subcontinent
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course investigates painters' engagements with India's literatures. Beginning with storytelling in contemporary artworks, this course proceeds to examine the emergence, refinement, and dispersion of literary and pictorial conventions in cosmopolitan early India and their transformations in later periods when book arts interacted with vernacularization, performative traditions, and eventually print culture.

HISTART 498. Honors Colloquium
Consent of instructor required. HISTART 393. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Directed research and writing in preparation for honors thesis. This course involves weekly meetings of each senior thesis writer, their faculty advisors, and the Director of Undergraduate Studies who oversees the seminar. Class time is divided between group meetings of all parties and individual tutorials between students and their advisors.

HISTART 499. Honors Thesis
HISTART 498. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Directed honors thesis research and writing.

HISTART 534 / CLARCH 534. Ancient Painting
Upperclass standing, HISTART 101 and either HISTART/CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

HISTART 536 / CLARCH 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
HISTART 101; one of CLARCH 221 or 222 or HISTART 221 or 222; and Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

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