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Courses in LSA Honors

Honors Courses

The Honors Program believes that challenging work, including research opportunities, should be available to superior students from the onset of their college education. Several types of Honors courses are offered for first and second year students:

  • courses offered by various departments intended only for Honors students
  • sections of regular courses for Honors students
  • courses sponsored by the Honors Program.

The Honors Core forms the foundation for an Honors education at U-M. Designed specifically for Honors students by innovative faculty the Honors Core Curriculum provides rigorous, wide-reaching introductory courses across the three academic divisions in LSA: the Natural Sciences (NS), the Social Sciences (SS), and the Humanities (HU). The Honors Core builds on the fine tradition of our historic Great Books course, which remains a Core Humanities course. The Core extends to other areas the many strengths of Great Books: foundational content, critical analysis, excellent instruction in writing, and social bonding. The Core is also integrative by providing opportunities for interaction between students and faculty in its various courses through electronic media, virtual meetings, and occasional symposia. Because Honors students take Core courses in both first and second years, they have added opportunities to form study groups and friendships more broadly across the Program. Honors students are required to elect three Core courses in their first two years, one Core course in each LSA division. Core courses that are available in any given semester are listed in the Course Guide.

Small seminars (HONORS 250, 251, and 252) enable students to discuss matters of intellectual substance with a senior faculty member on a variety of topics. These seminars enroll a maximum of 15 students.

Some upper level courses also count as Honors courses for first and second year students and many courses may be converted to Honors courses with the agreement of the professor and the Honors Program.

Honors research tutorials are available in any term by permission of the Honors Office. First-year students and sophomores elect HONORS 291 and 292 and may serve as research assistants for faculty researchers, receive instruction in research methods, or participate in some phase of University or individual research. Comparable courses are available for juniors (HONORS 390) and seniors (HONORS 490).

No course elected Pass/Fail will receive the Honors notation on the transcript or be counted as an "Honors" course for the Sophomore Honors Award.

Honors Program (HONORS)
HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors
First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

HONORS 135 will be seminar-style course with multiple sections of 15 first-year students each. Senior Honors students will engage the class in discussions on issues that have arisen from research and reading in the concentration.

HONORS 199. Colloquium
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Deep Time: the Science of Origins. The purpose of this course is to explore what science has taught us about where we (and everything else) really come from. Using an interactive, extra-disciplinary approach, this course provides a solid command of the current understanding of origins and of the scientific process.

HONORS 230. Honors Core in Social Science
Consent of department required. (4). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

As part of the Honors Core Curriculum, this course introduces Honors students to the fields, questions and meta-questions, and methodologies of the Social Sciences. The course uses both contemporary technology and time-honored methodologies to examine theoretical concepts, problems, and case studies; the course uses a variety of formats and strategies.

HONORS 231. Honors Core in Humanities
Consent of department required. (4). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

As part of the Honors Core Curriculum, this course introduces Honors students to the fields, questions and meta-questions, and methodologies of the Humanities. The topics vary, but all are extra-disciplinary in approach, providing a broad but rigorous investigation of the humanities.

HONORS 232. Honors Core in Natural Science
Consent of department required. (4). (NS). (BS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

As part of the Honors Core Curriculum, this course introduces Honors students to the fields, questions and meta-questions, and methodologies of the Natural Sciences. The topics vary, but all are extra-disciplinary in approach, providing a broad but rigorous investigation of the natural sciences.

HONORS 240. Honors Core Writing in Social Science
Consent of department required. (4). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

As part of the Honors Core Curriculum, this course introduces Honors students to academic writing while engaging with the fields, questions and meta-questions, and methodologies of the Social Sciences. The topics vary, but all are extra-disciplinary in approach, providing a broad but rigorous investigation of the social sciences.

HONORS 241. Honors Core Writing in Humanities
Consent of department required. (4). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

As part of the Honors Core Curriculum, this course introduces Honors students to academic writing while engaging with the fields, questions and meta-questions, and methodologies of the Humanities. The topics vary, but all are extra-disciplinary in approach, providing a broad but rigorous investigation of the humanities.

HONORS 242. Honors Core Writing in Natural Science
Consent of department required. (4). (NS). (BS). May be elected twice for credit.

As part of the Honors Core Curriculum, this course introduces Honors students to academic writing while engaging with the fields, questions and meta-questions, and methodologies of the Natural Sciences. The topics vary, but all are extra-disciplinary in approach, providing a broad but rigorous investigation of the natural sciences.

HONORS 250. Honors Social Sciences Seminar
Open to all Honors students. (3). (SS). May be elected twice for credit.

Honors seminars put students in close contact with faculty members while they jointly explore a topic of substantial intellectual importance. They are not meant to serve as full introductions to their fields, but rather as windows or lenses through which to view a subject or area of inquiry. These seminars also include explicit discussion and study of methodology, theory, and critical perspectives.

HONORS 251. Honors Humanities Seminar
Open to Honors students. May be repeated for credit with permission of department. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Honors seminars put students in close contact with faculty members while they jointly explore a topic of substantial intellectual importance. They are not meant to serve as full introductions to their fields, but rather as windows or lenses through which to view a subject or area of inquiry. These seminars also include explicit discussion and study of methodology, theory, and critical perspectives.

HONORS 252. Honors Natural Sciences Seminar
Open to Honors students. (3). (NS). (BS). May be elected twice for credit.

Honors seminars put students in close contact with faculty members while they jointly explore a topic of substantial intellectual importance. They are not meant to serve as full introductions to their fields, but rather as windows or lenses through which to view a subject or area of inquiry. These seminars also include explicit discussion and study of methodology, theory, and critical perspectives.

HONORS 290. Honors Introduction to Research
Consent of instructor required. Junior or Senior honors program. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. F, W, Sp, SS, Su.

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent guided study under the direction of a professor.

HONORS 291. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research
Consent of instructor required. Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. F, W, Sp, SS, Su.

HONORS 292. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research
Consent of instructor required. Permission of the Honors Program. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Students, working under close supervision of a faculty member either on their own or in a laboratory group, learn basic research and lab techniques.

HONORS 309 / GERMAN 309 / JAZZ 309. Imagination
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The Romantics made major claims for imagination: that it was both an artistic and cognitive faculty. This seminar will begin by considering both the structure of the Romantic literary imagination and the Romantic theory of knowledge and will conclude by investigating Freud's Interpretation of Dreams as a philosophy of aesthetic imagination. Taught in English.

HONORS 352. Honors Introduction to Research in the Natural Sciences
(3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to various methodologies and approaches used in research across the range of disciplines in the natural sciences. Students gain a sense of what research in the natural sciences is and how to pursue it.

HONORS 354 / AAS 354 / RCHUMS 354 / WOMENSTD 354. Race and Identity in Music
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the parameters of racial and ethnic identities in music; primarily but not exclusively in Western art music (commonly known as "classical music"). The focus is on understanding how racial and ethnic differences can be portrayed musically. Case studies are drawn from the late eighteenth century through the present with a strong emphasis on the nineteenth century and opera.

HONORS 365 / PHYSICS 365 / SI 365. Cyberscience: Computational Science and the Rise of the Fourth Paradigm
Computing language course (e.g., EECS 183, 280, ENGR 101), Introductory statistics (e.g., Stats 250). (3). (NS). (BS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

This course invites students to understand the ways in which data-rich, compute-intensive, collaborative research drives discovery in the natural and social sciences. Through readings, activities, and discussion with invited guests, students will gain an appreciation of the opportunities and challenges posed by the fast-growing, interdisciplinary subject of data science.

HONORS 390. Junior Honors Research
Consent of instructor required. Permission of the Honors Director. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HONORS 490, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

Supervised reading and research for Honors Juniors.

HONORS 490. Senior Honors Research
Consent of instructor required. Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. W.

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