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Courses in LSA Judaic Studies
The Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan offers students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Jewish civilizations and thought. The program explores the rich culture and historical experience of the Jewish people, their unique traditions, interactions with other cultures, and impact on world civilizations.
Judaic Studies (JUDAIC)
JUDAIC 101 / YIDDISH 101. Elementary Yiddish I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 431 or YIDDISH 431. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 431 or YIDDISH 431. F.

This is the first of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish. Active class participation is required as are periodic quizzes, exams, a midterm, and a final.

JUDAIC 102 / YIDDISH 102. Elementary Yiddish II
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 101. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 432 or YIDDISH 432. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 432 or YIDDISH 432. W.

This is the second of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish. Active class participation is required as are periodic quizzes, exams, a midterm and final.

JUDAIC 150. First Year Seminar in Judaic Studies
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will serve as a first-year seminar in the Humanities to be offered on special topics in Judaic Studies. Each section will serve as an introduction to various cultural aspects of Judaic Studies, such as diversity, history, ethnicity, religions, languages, art.

JUDAIC 201 / YIDDISH 201. Intermediate Yiddish I
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 102. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 531 or YIDDISH 531. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 531 or YIDDISH 531. F.

This is the third term of a language sequence in Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed. Special emphasis will be devoted to reading material.

JUDAIC 202 / YIDDISH 202. Intermediate Yiddish II
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 201. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 532 or YIDDISH 532. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 532 or YIDDISH 532. W.

This is the fourth term of a language sequence in Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed. Special emphasis will be devoted to reading material.

JUDAIC 205 / HJCS 276. Introduction to Jewish Civilizations and Culture
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 505 or HJCS 576.

An interdisciplinary, introductory survey of Jewish civilization and culture from Biblical times to the present in many countries. Jewish culture and civilization, among the oldest extant, have been enriched by their development in different cultural contexts. The course includes history, rabbinics, Jewish thought, Hebrew and Yiddish literatures, sociology, political science.

JUDAIC 218. Humanities Topics in Judaism
(1 - 4). (HU). May be elected eight times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Intended for lower-level undergraduate students, designated by the section title and taught by a Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty member, may include fields such as philosophy, film and video, literature, history, political science, etc., as they pertain to Judaic Studies.

JUDAIC 244 / AAPTIS 244 / HISTORY 244 / HJCS 244 / MENAS 244. The History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course assesses the origins, dynamics, and the amazing, chameleon-like persistence of Arab-Jewish conflict for over a hundred years, from the late 1800s to the present. How did the rivalry begin? Why is no end in sight? And what does the conflict say about truth and morality in international relations?

JUDAIC 250 / HJCS 250 / SAC 250. Jewish Film: Race, Ethnicity, and Nationality
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture course offers an introduction to Jewish cinema from the earliest silent films to contemporary animated documentary. A range of European, American, and Israeli films will offer contrasting representations of Jewish ethnicity across diverse national contexts. We will consider how the nexus of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality and class informs images of Jews on the screen created in divergent historical periods and political circumstances.

JUDAIC 257 / HISTORY 257. Law in the Pre-Modern World
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an historical and comparative introduction to the study of law, thus exposing students to a variety of ancient and medieval legal cultures across the globe. Besides grappling with the basic question of what law actually is, we investigate how law was made and justified, how laws were involved in governing and regulating human relations and transactions, and shifting notions of justice. We examine a range of famous and lesser-known legal sources and materials (codes, narratives, documents, trial records, cases, rituals, performances and ceremonies) as well as literature drawn from history, anthropology, and political theory.

JUDAIC 260 / HISTORY 269 / RELIGION 260. Introduction to the Talmud and the Rabbis
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Come learn about that great classic of Jewish culture, the Talmud. The Talmud is an idiosyncratic, complex, profound and humorous meditation on many aspects of life including law, ritual, desire and God. This course provides the historical and literary tools necessary to analyze this ancient text produced by the rabbis in the first few centuries CE.

JUDAIC 265 / HISTORY 256. Introduction to Jewish Law: Sources, Legal History and Legal Theory
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces the history and literature of Jewish legal traditions and philosophy of the classical, medieval and contemporary periods. We focus on rabbinic legal texts, codes, and responses as well as extra-rabbinic Jewish legal materials.

JUDAIC 270 / ACABS 270 / HJCS 270 / RELIGION 270. Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470 or JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570 or ACABS 570 or JUDAIC 570. Taught in English.

This course will explore the history and substance of these writings on three levels. First, we will situate the rabbinic literary enterprise within a broader cultural, historical and religious context. Second, we will examine the various genres that constitute rabbinic literature and get acquainted with the sages, an elite group of Jewish intellectuals, who created this corpus during the Roman and Byzantine periods. Finally, we will trace the way subsequent generations gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status.

JUDAIC 271 / SLAVIC 270. Contact and Conflict: Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe through Art, Film and Literature
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

The class surveys Jewish experience in Central and Eastern Europe, primarily in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on contact and coexistence in the multiethnic environments characteristic of the area. This experience will mainly be studied through literature and film, making the course primarily an investigation of cultural history.

JUDAIC 277 / AAPTIS 277 / ACABS 277 / HJCS 277 / RELIGION 277. The Land of Israel/Palestine through the Ages
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This survey course on the history of the Land of Israel/Palestine will outline the historical events that occurred in that territory, analyze the various factors (political, economic, cultural) that shaped its development, and introduce empires and nations that ruled the land as well as the people who inhabited its cities and villages.

JUDAIC 281 / HJCS 281 / SLAVIC 281. Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel, and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and reshaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions.

JUDAIC 290 / HISTORY 290. Jews and Muslims
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Despite negative portrayals of Jewish-Muslim relations in the media, Jews and Muslims have been in intimate contact since the rise of Islam. This course examines how Jews and Muslims interacted, competed, and coexisted from the Middle Ages to the present, and how the ethnic, religious, and racial categories of "Jew" and "Muslim" have been constructed.

JUDAIC 296 / HJCS 296 / RELIGION 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a study of the Holocaust as an historical event and its impact on Jewish thought and culture.

JUDAIC 301 / YIDDISH 301. Advanced Yiddish I
JUDAIC 102 or YIDDISH 202. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 631 or YIDDISH 631. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 631 or YIDDISH 631. F.

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music. Students will also learn how to approach handwritten documents.

JUDAIC 302 / YIDDISH 302. Advanced Yiddish II
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 301. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 632 or YIDDISH 632. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 632 or YIDDISH 632. W.

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music. Students will also learn how to approach handwritten documents.

JUDAIC 316. Topics in Jewish Literature
(1 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course in interdisciplinary field for undergraduate students, to be designated by the section title and taught by a member of the Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty. Topics focus on diverse Jewish literatures throughout the ages.

JUDAIC 317. Topics in Judaic Studies
(1 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course in interdisciplinary field for undergraduate students, to be designated by the section title and taught by a member of the Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty. May include fields such as philosophy, film and video, literature, history, political science, etc., as they pertain to Judaic Studies.

JUDAIC 318. Humanities Topics in Judaism
(1 - 4). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This interdisciplinary course for undergraduate students, designated by the section title and taught by a Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty member, may include fields such as philosophy, film and video, literature, history, political science, etc., as they pertain to Judaic Studies.

JUDAIC 319 / HJCS 319. Judaic Studies Abroad
Consent of department required. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 16 credits.

An off-campus study course under the supervision of a Judaic Studies faculty member. Students will be in engaged in on-site deep exploration of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, the two main urban centers of Israel. Tel Aviv and Jerusalem are perceived as two polar opposites in the cultural geography of Israel. Jerusalem is a historical city in the Judean Mountains with a rich and sacred past, while Tel Aviv - "the first Hebrew City" - seemed to emerge from the sand dunes of the Mediterranean Sea 100 years ago. Through the years, both cities went through massive changes- geographical, cultural and social -and their images have developed in complex ways. Students will explore key sites in the history of two cities. They will be meeting for a conversation with writers, filmmakers and artists living and working in the two cities. Students will also explore the ethnic, racial and cultural diversity of the population in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, including Ashkenazi and Mizrahi Jews (Jews from Arab countries), religious and secular Jews, Arabs (Moslem and Christians) and migrant workers.

JUDAIC 320 / AMCULT 320. The Jewish Graphic Novel
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Are the Jews the people of the graphic book? Can the Bible be rendered as comics? Did Jewish immigrants invent American superheroes? This seminar explores the poignant and oftentimes subversive ways in which American, European, and Israeli graphic narratives reconfigure canonical Jewish texts and address pivotal events in twentieth-century Jewish history.

JUDAIC 323 / HISTART 323 / HISTORY 350 / HJCS 323 / RELIGION 324. History of Jewish Visual Culture: From Ancient Mosaics to Jew-Hop Videos
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces art and images from ancient Israel through contemporary Jewish American and Israeli art and popular visual culture. Can art be Jewish? What of the supposed prohibition against idolatry? How do Jewish attitudes about arts and the ways of making it change across time and space?

JUDAIC 343 / AMCULT 343. American Jews and Media Industries
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Jews built on niche opportunities in emergent and developing media enterprises: movies, photography, recorded music, radio, comics, and television. As these "canned" forms of entertainment became popular and prestigious, controversies flared over the roles of Jews in "the mass media." Class discussions include a wide range of illustrative and analytical materials.

JUDAIC 344 / AMCULT 344. Passing: Race, Religion and Getting By
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Passing is the pretense of being a different sort of person for advantage or protection. The course examines the issue of Passing in relation to gender, race, sexuality, class, and ethnicity's (including "The Jewish Problem" of assimilation) through historical and theoretical studies, memoirs, short stories, plays and films.

JUDAIC 350 / BCS 350 / REEES 350. Legacy of the Holocaust in Yugoslav Culture: How and Why We Need to Narrate the Holocaust
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

The course explores new texts about the Holocaust written in response to the resurrection of racist ideologies in the context of post-Communist Eastern Europe, the EU enlargement, as well as a persistent global economic and social crisis. Readings include fictional and testimonial narratives, theoretical and documentary material.

JUDAIC 351 / DUTCH 351. Anne Frank in Context
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the Holocaust in The Netherlands and beyond through the analysis of the Diary of Anne Frank, its film, stage and television adaptations, and related materials. It aims to increase your understanding of anti-Semitism and other forms of hatred and discrimination. Topics include Jewish immigration, Jewish Amsterdam, bystanders, resistance movement, and controversial issues like the fictionalization of Anne Frank and alleged Holocaust exploitation. Taught in English

JUDAIC 360. A Global History of the Jews of Spain
JUDAIC 205. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

1492 marked the expulsion of Jews from Spain, but Iberian Jews retained a distinct identity long after leaving their peninsula. This course examines how Sephardic Jews maintained ties of commerce, language, and identity across the globe and uses the story of Spanish Jewry as case study in world history.

JUDAIC 376 / WOMENSTD 376. Women and the Bible
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

There are many ways to read the Bible and ways of reading the Bible, and modes of interpretation have led to radically different constructions of women among various religious and ethnic groups and in diverse historical and geographical settings. Through names, languages, fiction, poetry, ritual objects, folklore, music, and other cultural expressions, this course considers the burgeoning feminist literature and cultural productions about women in monotheistic traditions, such as Eve, Sara, Hagar, Miriam, and Ruth.

JUDAIC 380 / CLCIV 380 / HISTORY 381 / RELIGION 382. Ancient Jewish History to 638 CE: From Israelite Origins to Islamic Conquest
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted for students who have taken both ACABS 322 and ACABS 326.

This is an introduction to Jewish history and culture as it emerged in the sixth century B.C.E. until the Persian and Islamic conquests in the seventh century. We will try to understand how the "varieties of Judaism" emerged from the religion and culture of Israelite origins in the context of Near Eastern and Mediterranean imperial and cultural history.

JUDAIC 384 / HISTORY 384. Modern Jewish History 1880-1948
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is focused around a series of themes including socialism and the varieties of Jewish nationalism, Jewish life in Eastern Europe, Zionism, the Mandate for Palestine, the Nazi genocide, Jews in Russia and Palestine, and the rise of the state of Israel.

JUDAIC 386 / HISTORY 386. The Holocaust
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the destruction of European Jewry (1933-1945), its causes and effects. Major themes include the resurgence of political and racial and anti-Semitism in the nineteenth century, European jewry in the period before World War II, the rise of the Nazis to power and the response of European society and European Jewry, the "final solution," and the literature of the Holocaust.

JUDAIC 387 / AMCULT 387 / HISTORY 387. History of American Jews
(4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history of American Jews from the colonial era to the 21st century, focusing on immigration, politics, cultural creativity, religious innovation, and the establishment of a diasporic community with ties to Jews throughout the world. The course asks how Jews resolved the tensions between being Jewish and American.

JUDAIC 401. Readings in Yiddish Texts
Two years of Yiddish or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

JUDAIC 410 / SOC 410. Sociology of the American Jewish Community
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course reviews sociological literature on the American Jewish community, explores current issues, and examines the conflicts and struggles of American Jews as they strive to maintain their identity in a pluralistic society.

JUDAIC 416. Topics in Jewish Literature
(1 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course in interdisciplinary field for advanced undergraduate students, to be designated by the section title and taught by a member of the Judaic Studies regular or visiting faculty. Topics focus on diverse Jewish literatures throughout the ages.

JUDAIC 417. Topics in Judaic Studies
(3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Intended for advanced undergraduates interested in the interdisciplinary field of Judaic Studies, this course examines selected topics in areas such as literature, history, philosophy, film, political science and law. Although taught in English by regular faculty in Judaic Studies or visiting faculty, some topics may require students to interpret various texts and to situate them in relation to historical traditional contexts.

JUDAIC 435 / HISTORY 435 / RUSSIAN 435. Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and the Arts
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Course surveys major trends of cultural development of Jews in Russia from late 18th to early 21st centuries, focusing on literary and artistic creativity in Russian cultural context. Special attention is given to two major centers in Odessa and St. Petersburg treated as two different models of Jewish cultural life.

JUDAIC 451 / POLSCI 350. The Politics and Culture of Modern East European Jewry
A course in East European and/or Jewish history, and Comparative Politics is recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Sp/Su in Poland.

The course emphasizes the inter-relationships between the communal institutions of East European Jews and the ways in which this ethnic and religious minority developed the means of dealing with states and the larger societies.

JUDAIC 467 / HJCS 577 / RELIGION 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics within history of modern Judaism such as reform and tradition in modern Judaism, theological responses to the Holocaust, modern Jewish philosophy. Topics will change.

JUDAIC 468 / HJCS 478 / RELIGION 469. Jewish Mysticism
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. While the course will survey mystical traditions from the early rabbinic period through the modern, the focus will be on the variegated medieval stream known as kabbalah.

JUDAIC 470 / ACABS 470 / HJCS 470. Reading the Rabbis
ACABS 202 or HJCS 202. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ACABS 270/HJCS 270/JUDAIC 270 or ACABS 570/HJCS 570/JUDAIC 570.

Students will study rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature.

JUDAIC 478 / HJCS 477 / RELIGION 478. Modern Jewish Thought
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

JUDAIC 495. Independent Studies
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F.

JUDAIC 496. Independent Studies
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

JUDAIC 497. Senior Thesis
Consent of instructor required. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of JUDAIC 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F.

JUDAIC 498. Senior Thesis
Consent of instructor required. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

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