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Courses in LSA II: Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Latin American and Caribbean Studies (LACS)
LACS 305 / AAS 305 / HISTORY 305. Histories of the Modern Caribbean
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Situated at the historical crossroads of Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the United States, the Caribbean has played a pivotal role in global transformations since 1492. The course will focus on the Greater Antilles -- Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and especially Haiti and Cuba -- we will explore world historical themes in this region from the Haitian revolution to the present.

LACS 321. Social Science Topics in LACS
(3 - 4). (SS). May be elected twice for credit.

This course examines an aspect or topic in LACS not covered in a specific country or time period. Topics are taught from a Social Science perspective.

LACS 349 / HISTORY 349. U.S. Interventions in Latin America and the World
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores U.S. interventions in Latin America and elsewhere that have deposed foreign governments since the 1890s: military occupation and "nation building" in the early 20th century; CIA operations targeting social democratic and socialist polities during the Cold War; humanitarian actions in the 1990s; and recent takeovers of Afghanistan and Iraq.

LACS 355. Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
(3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course addresses current issues in Latin American and Caribbean societies and cultures. Content varies from semester to semester.

LACS 399. Thesis-Writers' Seminar
Consent of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term’s elections.

All students concentrating in Latin American and Caribbean Studies will enroll in this seminar in either the Fall or Winter of their Senior year. Each student will work directly with a thesis advisory, and will be graded by that advisor. The seminar will meet only occasionally as a group; its main function is to provide a mechanism for consultation and support among thesis-writers and between thesis-writers and the concentration advisors.

LACS 421 / AAS 421 / HISTORY 421 / RELIGION 421. Religions of the African Diaspora
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Conceptualizes "diaspora" and introduces Brazilian Candomble, Cuban Santeria and Palo Monte, Haitian Vodou, Jamaican and globalized Rastafari, the ancestor religion of the Garifuna of Central America, and Afro-Indian practices in Trinidad. Studies of historical development as well as contemporary practice will be used.

LACS 446 / LING 446. Comparative Linguistics
At least one course in Linguistics/language analysis. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course introduces students to research on comparative linguistics. It is directed to students interested in the study of different language, or to anyone interested in a more thorough understanding of the common properties among human languages and of the possible variation across the structure.

LACS 455. Topics in Latin American Studies
Consent of instructor required. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course addresses current issues in Latin American society and culture. Content varies from semester to semester.

LACS 471. Elementary Quechua, I
Permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Course designed to introduce students with little or no Quechua proficiency to conversational and cultural skills needed to use the language in real life situations. Covers both written and spoken Quechua; emphasis is on developing conversational ability. Evaluations based on homework, weekly quizzes, reading aloud, interviews.

LACS 472. Elementary Quechua, II
Consent of instructor required. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Second-semester continuation of Elementary Quechua I; course introduces basic structures of Quechua while focusing on the development of speaking and reading skills. Those who successfully finish this course will gain sustained control of basic conversation.

LACS 473. Intermediate Quechua, I
Permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

In this intermediate course in Quechua emphasis is on conversation, but attention is also given to grammatical structure. Students learn complex structural patterns, build up vocabulary, get acquainted with Andean culture and society, and develop conversation skills.

LACS 474. Intermediate Quechua, II
Consent of instructor required. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit.

This continuation of the intermediate course in spoken and written Quechua emphasizes conversational skills and grammatical structure. Students learn complex structural patterns, build up vocabulary, get acquainted with Andean culture and society, and develop conversation skills.

LACS 475. Advanced Quechua, I
Permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Advanced Quechua is to improve conversation skills, build up vocabulary, and heighten reading ability in Quechua. Reading materials inform students of Andean culture, history, and literature. Students learn more accurate syntax, pragmatic ways of expression, and ways of thinking in Quechua.

LACS 476. Advanced Quechua, II
Consent of instructor required. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This continuation of the advanced Quechua course is to improve conversation skills, build up vocabulary, and heighten reading ability. Strengthened aural/oral training is given. Students work with original, unedited texts as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials in Quechua literature.

LACS 483 / AAS 473 / HISTORY 473. Brazil: History and Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the history of Brazil, focusing on literature and performance as expressions of the national or regional cultural identities, with particular attention to racial categories and African heritage. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and paternalism; religious expression; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression, incorporating interdisciplinary sources such as fiction, archival documents, testimony, ethnography, recorded music, and dance/movement.

LACS 490. Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies Mini-course
Permission of Instructor. (1 - 2). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is meant to examine various topics, designated by the section title, and offered as a seven-week mini-course.

LACS 499. Reading and Research in Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Independent reading and research in Latin American and Caribbean Studies under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

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