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Courses in LSA II: Middle Eastern and North African Studies
Middle Eastern and North African Studies (MENAS)
MENAS 243 / HISTORY 243. The Dawn of Islamic History
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers neither a conspectus of Muslim religious beliefs and practices nor a comprehensive survey of the political expansion of Islamic states. Rather, by examining the role of Islam in world history through the five themes outlined below, it moves away from viewing Islam as a monolithic, timeless entity and instead explores its diverse pathways without privileging any single narrative or viewpoint. Ultimately, the course asks how useful the category of "Islam" is to understanding the global past. This course examines the history of Islam in its global dimensions and contexts through five key themes: 1. Islam as Religion; 2. Islam as Polity; 3. Islam as Cosmopolis; 4. Islam as Ideology; 5. Islam and Modernity.

MENAS 244 / HISTORY 244 / JUDAIC 244 / NEAREAST 284. The History of the Arab-Israeli Conflict
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course assesses the origins, dynamics, and the amazing, chameleon-like persistence of Arab-Jewish conflict for over a hundred years, from the late 1800s to the present. How did the rivalry begin? Why is no end in sight? And what does the conflict say about truth and morality in international relations?

MENAS 334 / AAPTIS 364 / HISTORY 334. Selected Topics in Near and Middle Eastern Studies
(1 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

MENAS 340 / ASIAN 340 / HISTORY 340 / NEAREAST 340 / REEES 340. From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
(4; 3 - 4 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an overview of modern Central Asian history. It focuses on the empires of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang).

MENAS 398. MENAS Internship
Consent of instructor required. AAPTIS 101 or higher for Arabic or AAPTIS 151 or higher for Turkish. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

This course allows students to receive credit for an internship in the Middle Eastern and North African region arranged through the UM Center for International Business Education (CIBE). Students may use the internship experience as the basis for a substantial academic paper in English or in the language of the country under the supervision of a country expert.

MENAS 461 / EDUC 461. Web Based Mentorship: Earth Odysseys
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Students serve as mentors to a worldwide network of middle school and high school participants in cultural issues forum linked to vicarious travel. As the forum participants respond to reports from various global settings, mentors seek to deepen, challenge and honor student thinking, and to help forum participants make connections to their own lives. Mentors learn about the country being explored, develop curriculum for use by network teachers, and participate in ongoing reflection on the teaching and learning dimensions of their mentoring work.

MENAS 462 / EDUC 462. Web Based Mentorship: Place Out of Time
Consent of instructor required. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Students serve as teaching mentors for a web-based character-playing simulation involving high school and middle school students on a worldwide network, and they themselves also research and portray historical figures. The Place Out of Time simulated trial is different every term, but mentors and students are always presented with a contemporary problem that they must think through in the role of their characters, one that frames an array of social, political, cultural and moral question. Mentors are active participants in a dynamic, writing-intensive enterprise that is aimed at enlivening the study of history through juxtaposing historical perspective and sensibilities. The course employs purposeful "play" to frame a hands-on teaching experience that is supported by extensive in-class and written reflective work.

MENAS 463 / EDUC 463. Web Based Mentorship: Arab-Israeli Conflict Simulation
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course is linked to a web-based simulation that engages high school students worldwide in exploring the Arab-Israeli Conflict through portraying current political leaders and representing stakeholder nations. Course participants facilitate this diplomatic simulation, working closely with the simulation participants to offer a window into the diplomatic process. Course participants learn about the contemporary politics of the region, and work in teams as gatekeepers and facilitators, helping their student mentees to thoughtfully assume character, and to think and write purposefully and persuasively. This course is a hands-on teaching experience that is supported by extensive in-class and written reflective work.

MENAS 493 / NEAREAST 483. Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
(1). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This 1-credit course, jointly offered by CMENAS and the Near Eastern Studies, brings together a diverse cohort of specialists covering 5000 years of history, languages, and culture, and a geographical area stretching from the Atlantic to Central Asia. Through a series of lectures by UM faculty and outside speakers, addressing a particular theme chose for that semester, students consider multiple perspectives of comparative research across the ages and cultures.

MENAS 495. Senior Honors Thesis
Consent of instructor required. Open only to Honors concentrators with senior standing. (3 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of MENAS 496, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

MENAS 496. Senior Honors Thesis
Consent of instructor required. MENAS 495; Open only to Honors concentrators with senior standing. (3 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

MENAS 591. Interdisciplinary Middle East Topics Seminar
Upperclass standing; concentration in MENAS, NES or other fields with main interest in Middle Eastern Studies. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This is a seminar for students beginning graduate study of the Middle East and North Africa. It introduces them to a broad range of disciplinary approaches and methodologies. The course will concentrate on different areas and problems each year.

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