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Courses in LSA Political Science
Political science is the systematic study of governmental and political structures, processes, and policies. This study uses institutional, quantitative, and philosophical approaches. The field is highly diverse, ranging across political theory, comparative government, international relations, American government, public policy, and research methods. Political scientists concentrate on public opinion and voting, organized political behavior, governmental institutions, studies of single countries, comparisons across countries and relations among countries. The field addresses both normative and empirical concerns.

Roster of POLSCI subfields and courses:

  • American
    111, 300, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 322, 323, 324, 326, 327, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 380, 385, 410, 432, 482, 484, 486, 496
  • Comparative
    140, 336, 337, 338, 339, 340, 341, 342, 343, 344, 345, 346, 347, 348, 349, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, 357, 358, 359, 382, 387, 395, 396, 397, 451, 497
  • Methods
    381, 391, 488, 490, 499
  • Theory
    101, 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 309, 400, 401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 406, 407, 408, 409, 495
  • World
    160, 360, 361, 363, 364, 365, 368, 369, 370, 371, 372, 379, 462, 463, 498
Political Science (POLSCI)
POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory
Primarily for first and second year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

Inquiry into our assumptions about politics and the words we use to express them. Persistent political questions, such as the nature of power, authority, freedom, and justice, will be discussed in classic and modern contexts.

POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics
Primarily for first and second year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics
Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W.

POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Su.

POLSCI 190. First-Year Seminar in Political Science
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to introduce first-year students to political science topics in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

POLSCI 299. Directed Undergraduate Internship in Political Science
Consent of department required. Declared political science concentrator. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course allows political science concentrators under the direction of faculty supervision to receive credit for a full-time internship of a least 8 weeks or the equivalent in part-time work (at least 320 hours). The goal of an approved job or internship is to enrich student's academic experience and/or allows them to explore related careers related. Credit MAY NOT be used to satisfy elective credits for the concentration.

POLSCI 300. Contemporary Political Issues
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 301. Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the principal theorists who have influenced political thought and development from the fifth century B.C. to the early seventeenth century A.D.

POLSCI 302. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent
POLSCI 101. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the principal theorists who have influenced political thought and development in the period from the seventeenth century to the present.

POLSCI 307. Topics in American Political Thought
POLSCI 101 or 111. (3 - 4). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This topics course focuses on specific themes in American political thought. Examples include: a specific historical period in American politics (such as the Colonial Era, early Republic, Reconstruction, Progressive Era); or a particular theme (race, development of rights or the state, inequality). The course serves as a bridge between the general study of American politics and political theory.

POLSCI 309. Theoretical Perspectives on Environmental Change
POLSCI 101. (3 - 4). (SS). May be elected twice for credit.

This course draws upon concepts from Western political theory to examine the political and ethical issues posed by environmental change.

POLSCI 311. American Political Processes
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a survey of mass public and elite behavior and the interaction between masses and elites. Topics discussed include public opinion and electoral behavior, political parties and interest groups, relations between office-holders and the public, and alternative models for describing the American political system.

POLSCI 312. Persuasive Politics: Voters, Campaigns and Communication Strategies
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course, we will accomplish two things. First, we will become familiar with the logic of running a political persuasion campaign. For this purpose, we will study current research on persuasion as well as current research on campaigns. Second, each student will participate in the design of a persuasion campaign. Throughout the semester, we will discuss how to design the campaign. In the last two weeks of the class, every student will take part in a presentation for the entire class. They will then take questions from the class about the content and strategy of the presentation.

POLSCI 314. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems
POLSCI 111. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course analyzes the characteristics and determinative conditions of the American party and election system.

POLSCI 315. Media and Public Opinion
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course discusses the effects of the media on the beliefs, values, and choices of ordinary citizens. It examines evidence of media influence in evaluations of government; attitudes toward war and foreign policy; formation of group identities and stereotypes; and learning about and choosing candidates in elections, among other topics.

POLSCI 317. Courts, Politics and Society
One course in Political Science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the role of the legal process in American politics. In addition to studying the recruitment, careers, and behavior of lawyers, judges, prosecutors, and the police, it assesses how the operation of the legal system affects the social order. It emphasizes the way the legal system applies the law rather than the content of the law itself.

POLSCI 318. American Constitutional Politics
POLSCI 111. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines Supreme Court interpretations of the Constitution and the political implications of these interpretations. Court cases and interpretive essays are among the readings.

POLSCI 319. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights
POLSCI 111. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines a number of Supreme Court decisions in the field of civil liberties and civil rights. In addition to delineating the political significance of the decisions, some emphasis is also placed on the dynamics of compliance with the Court's stated policy.

POLSCI 320. The American Chief Executive
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the development of the office and functions of the chief executive and an analysis of the sources and nature of executive power in American national and state government. Primary attention is given to the presidency.

POLSCI 322. Legislative Process
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an analysis of political behavior in legislatures, including legislators' recruitment and socialization, their decision making processes, and their relations with constituents, parties, interest groups, and the Chief Executive. Special attention is given to the United States Congress.

POLSCI 324 / AAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System
One course in Political Science and AAS 201. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the status of Blacks in the American political system. Students analyzes the capacity and the capability of the political system for negotiating internal conflicts involving Black/White relationships.

POLSCI 326. American State Government
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines processes; administrative functions; personnel and fiscal problems; nation-state, interstate, and state-local relations; and the future of the states in the federal system.

POLSCI 327. Politics of the Metropolis
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a survey of the major demographic, social, and economic trends in metropolitan areas and an analysis of government responses to these trends. Particular emphasis is placed on formal governmental policies in these areas as well as on the distribution of power and influence in the modern metropolis.

POLSCI 329 / COMM 329. Mass Media and Political Behavior
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Focuses on the role and importance of mass media in the political process. Topics include: how news is made; political advertising; relations between Congress, the President and the media; and the role of mass media in political campaigns. These topics are examined through a systematic review of research in both mass communication and political science.

POLSCI 330. Psychological Perspectives on Politics
POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture course is a topical survey of psychological perspectives on politics. There are many psychological schools of thought; there are many political problems. We take up a number of the most interesting intersections between the two, e.g. socialization, leadership, decision-making, mobilization of political discontent.

POLSCI 331 / ENVIRON 345 / SOC 380. Environmental Public Opinion Analysis
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines trends in environmental public opinion, influences on people's concerns about the environment, the depth and strength of concerns, and how environmental concerns affect personal behaviors and the political process. It also introduces students to useful statistical concepts and procedures for analyzing and interpreting public opinion data.

POLSCI 336. Energy Politics
One course in Political Science. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Meeting the surging energy needs of their citizens represents one of the most daunting challenges facing governments across the world. This course examines the politics of electricity provision, the impacts of natural resource wealth, and environmental politics in both democratic and non-democratic settings, with a special focus on the developing world.

POLSCI 337. Comparative Constitutional Design
One course in Political Science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an interest-based approach to the study of constitution building. Through theory and comparison of constitutional experiences it examines how different institutional structures create winners and losers in society. It considers the role of courts, of legislatures, and of people as interpreters and legitimizers of the constitutional document.

POLSCI 339 / ASIAN 428. China's Evolution Under Communism
Upperclass standing. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an analysis of developments since 1949 with particular emphasis on the evolution of political control, economic development, and social change and their relationship to ideology.

POLSCI 340. Governments and Politics in Western Europe
POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course analyzes the political systems of France, Great Britain, Germany, and Italy. Emphasis is placed on the nature and source of political conflict. Students devote special attention to one or more of the countries discussed.

POLSCI 341. Comparative Politics of Developed Democracies
POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces the comparative political science of developed democracies. In it, we theorize and evaluate empirically the systematic relationships that may obtain therein from societal interest structures (such as ethno-linguistic or religious heterogeneity, or the income distribution), through political institutions (like electoral systems and parliamentarism or presidentialism) and contexts (such as elections, government-formation, and policymaking processes in contexts of stagflation or globalization), to certain social, political, and economic outcomes (like democratic representation and economic and social policies and outcomes).

POLSCI 342. Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform
POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a survey of the political and social development of Eastern Europe under socialism. Major themes include the political cultures of the area, communist accession to power, totalitarianism and its erosion, elite-mass relations, the role of public opinion and interest groups, and economic and political change.

POLSCI 343. Political Economy of Developed Democracies
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the impact of politics on economic policy and outcomes, and conversely, the impact of the economy on the conduct of politics.

POLSCI 347. Politics and Society in Latin America
POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an analysis of social change and political conflict in contemporary Latin America. Topics considered include race, class, and stratification; the role of the military; religion and politics; and the nature and implications of economic dependence. From year to year, emphasis is given to different countries (i.e., Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, Brazil, Argentina).

POLSCI 350 / JUDAIC 451. The Politics and Culture of Modern East European Jewry
A course in East European and/or Jewish history, and Comparative Politics is recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course emphasizes the inter-relationships between the communal institutions of East European Jews and the ways in which this ethnic and religious minority developed the means of dealing with states and the larger societies.

POLSCI 351. Israeli Society and Politics
One course in Political Science or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the political culture and Zionist foundation of the Jewish state, its institutions, political parties, and elites. Electoral behavior and coalition politics are analyzed. Political consequences of social issues, such as the integration of immigrants and ethnic-religious minorities, are examined along with problems of religion and politics.

POLSCI 353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 354 / SEAS 354. Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia
One course in Political Science or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course analyzes political developments in the countries of Southeast Asia defined in terms of Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos, Burma, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines.

POLSCI 356. Government and Politics of Japan
POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an analysis of the political development of Japan emphasizing contemporary problems and trends. Supplementary consideration is given to political developments in Korea and adjacent areas.

POLSCI 358. Politics of the European Union
One course in Political Science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course studies the development of the European Union; the negotiations to create the EU and the politics surrounding expansion of EU power into new spheres of activity; the consequences of this institution for sovereignty and democracy.

POLSCI 359 / AAS 359. African Politics
AAS 200. (3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

A comparative survey of the African states and territories, with primary emphasis on the process of decolonization, the continued dependent status of African states, obstacles to change, and alternative strategies of development.

POLSCI 362 / HISTORY 312. History of European Integration
(4; 3 in the half-term). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims to introduce students from humanistic and social scientific backgrounds to the study of European integration and trans-national identity formation, viewed as contested and contingent historical processes.

POLSCI 364. Public International Law
One course in Political Science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course studies the law of the international community as it has been developed historically and recognized by modern states with special reference to the position of the United States.

POLSCI 369. Politics of International Economic Relations
POLSCI 160. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

The course deals with the manner in which politics and economics interact in three areas of world politics; the relations between the industrialized nations of the West, the Cold War and detente, and North-South relations. Specialized topics such as the political determinants of the terms of trade, the transnational corporation and the politics of international monetary relations are integrated into the course.

POLSCI 380 / ENVIRON 312 / PUBPOL 312. Environmental Politics and Policy
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an advanced offering on environmental politics and the environmental policy-making process. The course will consider both processes of policy formation and implementation, placing particular emphasis on the development of alternatives to conventional regulatory practices at federal, state, and local levels of government.

POLSCI 381. Political Science Research Design
Political Science concentrators. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims to (1) expose students to conducting research in political science and (2) give student tools for identifying a problem, designing a methodology for investigating the problem, and proposing an outline for an argument. Required for students applying to the Political Science honors program.

POLSCI 386 / GERMAN 379 / SOC 379. Sports, Politics, and Society
One introductory course in sociology or political science. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for those who have completed SOC 212/GERMAN 212.

This course embraces broadly-based theories of society and politics to comparatively examine sports in the U.S. and Europe. Sports are closely tied to societal values on both sides of the Atlantic and furnish an excellent example for the study of popular attitudes and behavior.

POLSCI 387. Comparative Analysis of Government Institutions
Two courses in political science or junior standing. (4; 3 - 4 in the half-term). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit.

This course addresses the large institutional questions in comparative politics. It explores the differences between presidentialism vs. parliamentarism, two vs. multiparty systems, disciplined vs. weak parties, unicameralism vs. bicameralism, and the role of bureaucrats vs. the judiciary.

POLSCI 389. Topics in Contemporary Political Science
One course in Political Science. (3 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Contemporary topics in Political Science; content and number of credits varies by term and instructor.

POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science
Consent of instructor required. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

A course to allow students to gain practicum credit for working on the Michigan Journal of Political Science

POLSCI 391 / CMPLXSYS 391. Introduction to Modeling Political Processes
One course in Political Science. (4). (SS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to constructing, manipulating, and evaluating logical and mathematical models of social and political processes. Topics to be considered may include rational choice, game theory, learning processes and exchange processes.

POLSCI 392. Michigan in Washington: Preparatory Seminar
Consent of department required. Admission to Michigan in Washington Program. (2). May be elected twice for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course prepares students for the Michigan in Washington semester. The fundamental guiding principle for the class is to cover whatever a student needs in order to have a successful internship in Washington, D.C. and conduct meaningful original research in the research seminar.

POLSCI 393. Inside Washington, D.C.
Consent of instructor required. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

For participants in the Michigan in Washington (MIW) undergraduate internship program. Students attend eight speeches, discussions, panels, or presentations on the history, politics, society, economics, and culture of Washington, and its role as the nation's capital. Speakers include government officials, leaders of corporations and non-profit organizations, and non-profit organizations, scientists, journalists, museum curators, musicians, and artists.

POLSCI 394 / ENVIRON 313. Environment and Development: Dilemmas of Power and Place in a Global World
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the interaction between development and environment in less developed regions of the world. It will focus especially on various aspects of environmental protection and management ranging from conservation, to decentralization of natural resources management, to the emergence of global institutions for environmental governance.

POLSCI 395 / HISTORY 332 / REEES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor. F.

POLSCI 396 / HISTORY 333 / REEES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / SOC 393. Survey of Central and Eastern Europe and the Enlarged European Union
(3 - 4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor.

An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Central and Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world, especially with regard to the European Union.

POLSCI 398. Michigan In Washington: Internship
Consent of department required. (2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is intended to give credit for internship work completed during the Michigan in Washington semester.

POLSCI 399. Advanced Internship in Political Science
Consent of instructor required. Political Science concentrators who have completed at least two-upper-level POLSCI courses. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Directed internship programs or field study in international, national, state, or local government agencies.

POLSCI 401 / WOMENSTD 422. Feminist Political Theory
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 403 / CLCIV 403. Greek Political Thought
POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 406. Democratic Theory
POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course studies the competing conceptions of democracy: Rousseau, Toqueville, Mill and includes critiques from economists and sociologists. Selected policy issues are included in judicial review, representative ethics, the connection between capitalism and democracy and the rationality of voting.

POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought
POLSCI 101, 302 or an equivalent. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers a chronological survey of some central contributions to contemporary political thought. Its premise is that 20th-century political thinkers have offered us different (a) vocabularies to understand modern political world and (b) arguments for why and how we should try to change that world. Beginning with the German sociologist Max Weber and ending with the South African novelist J.M. Coetzee, the course draws from contributions outside political theory proper. The course is writing-intensive.

POLSCI 410. Washington Experience Seminar
Consent of instructor required. (2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The goal of this course is to prepare participants in the Michigan in Washington Program for a semester in the nation's capital. Students review the basic principles of American national government, both structure and process. The course readings are designed to give students a more "hands-on" understanding of politics in D.C. than other usual courses.

POLSCI 411. Michigan In Washington: National Capital Research Project
Consent of department required. (4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores how to identify good research questions and credible research methods. Students are expected to formulate a question or hypothesis, write an extensive literature review, develop a research design, and insofar as possible, execute the research and write the results in a paper.

POLSCI 425 / ECON 425. Inequality in the United States
ECON 401. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) POLSCI 111. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course studies inequality in the United States (with comparisons to global inequality). It considers current, plausible, social scientific (especially economic and political) explanations of inequality in income, wealth, health, education, and political power, focusing on the extent to which interconnected social institutions create, maintain, or undermine inequality.

POLSCI 432. Law and Public Policy
Two courses in Political Science, including POLSCI 111 or its equivalent. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Courts are policy makers. Judges are called upon to "apply" the law to specific disputes that are brought before them, and this process is anything but mechanical. Judges create the law as they resolve specific disputes, often disguising their own creativity. Throughout the course, we inquire into the techniques judges use to make policy and consider whether the courts are up to the task of policy making which confronts them with every decision.

POLSCI 450 / SOC 450. Political Sociology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to basic concepts in political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationships between the global expansion of capitalism, the revolutionary transformation of societies, and the rise of modern political systems.

POLSCI 458 / AAS 497. Party Politics and Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the transition from one party to multi-party democracies in Africa, the growth of political parties, and prospects for the institutionalization of democracy across the continent. The course explores the extensive literature in comparative politics on parties and party systems, and its content is theoretical and empirical.

POLSCI 462. Strategic Interaction in World Politics
POLSCI 160 and an additional course in Political Science. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course looks at theories of international relations, their logic, and their application to understand individual events. Topics covered include the causes of war, negotiation, domestic politics, and foreign policy, and international institutions and cooperation. The student will be introduced to game theory, a mathematical theory of strategic interaction, and its application to international politics.

POLSCI 485. Election Forensics
Political Science major. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Did the official winner of an election really win? The 2000 election for president in the United States raised that question sharply, when many claimed the wrong man took office. This course reviews these methods - everything from analyzing precinct and voting machine election returns to post-election audits.

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups
One course in Political Science. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Seniors only. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

A senior level course taught by faculty on advanced topics in political science.

POLSCI 490. Game Theory and Formal Models
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to game theory and other kinds of formal modeling, with an emphasis on models of political systems.

POLSCI 491. Directed Studies
Consent of instructor required. Two courses in Political Science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1 - 6). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. POLSCI 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. F.

POLSCI 492. Directed Studies
Consent of instructor required. Two courses in Political Science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1 - 6). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. POLSCI 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. W.

POLSCI 493. Senior Honors Proseminar
Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (POLSCI 494), the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F.

POLSCI 494. Senior Honors Proseminar
Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. W.

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory
One of the following: POLSCI 101, 301, 302, 307, 309; or PHIL 366; or GTBOOKS 191 or 192. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Selected topics in political theory.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government
Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Selected topics in comparative and foreign governments.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics
Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Selected topics in international politics.

POLSCI 499. Quantitative Methods of Political Analysis
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

POLSCI 514. The Use of Social Science Computer Programs
Consent of instructor required. POLSCI 599/equivalent or permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

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