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Courses in LSA Sociology
Sociology is about people and their patterns; it seeks to understand and account for the complexities of human interaction and patterns of social life. It focuses on relations among people, groups, organizations, classes, cultures, and society. Sociology scientifically explores and analyzes issues vital to our personal lives, our communities, our society, and the world. In short, it involves all aspects of human experience and activity. Almost any aspect of how human beings gather together in groups, organizations, and societies can be studied within sociology. The study of sociology provides fascinating and distinctive perspectives on the social world. The field also offers a range of research techniques that can be applied to virtually any aspect of social life: crime and delinquency, family dynamics, corporate downsizing, how people express emotions, welfare or education reform, or global issues of peace and war. Because sociology addresses the most challenging issues of our time, it is a rapidly expanding field with broad implications.

Students planning to concentrate in sociology must elect and complete with a C- or better one of the following introductory courses before declaring the concentration: SOC 100, 102, 195, or 300. SOC 195 is restricted to first- and second-year students who are in the LSA Honors Program and/or have a GPA of 3.2 or higher. Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for seniors in SOC 100 and 102 in semesters in which SOC 300 is not offered.

Credit Limits and Exclusions

A combined total of eight INDEPENDENT or EXPERIENTIAL credits may be included in the concentration plan. This includes SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396. There is an additional limit on SOC 389 credits; only four credits of SOC 389 may be included in the concentration plan.

Sociology (SOC)
SOC 100. Introduction to Sociology
Restricted to first-year students, sophomores, and juniors. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for upper-level students in SOC 100 and 102 in semesters in which SOC 300 is not offered. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 102, 195, or 300. May not be included in a Sociology concentration plan.

This course is an introduction to sociology as a field of scholarship and mode of inquiry. Students develop their own ability to reason sociologically and become part of an ongoing conversation about the patterns, probabilities, principles, and processes that characterize society.

SOC 102. Introduction to Sociology: Special Topics
Restricted to first-year students, sophomores, and juniors. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Juniors and seniors electing an introductory course are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 300, although there is limited space available for upper-level students in SOC 100 and 102 in semesters in which SOC 300 is not offered. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. No credit granted to students who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 100, 195, or 300. May not be included in a Sociology concentration plan.

An introduction to the discipline of sociology via examination of topical social issues.

SOC 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a Sociology concentration plan.

An examination of topical social issues.

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122 / UC 122. Intergroup Dialogues
(2). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. May not be included in a major in Psychology or Sociology.

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context.

SOC 195. Honors Introduction to Sociology
Open to first- and second-year students admitted to the LSA Honors Program. Other first- and second-year students with a minimum GPA of 3.2 may enroll with permission. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 100, 102, or 300. May not be included in a Sociology concentration plan.

An accelerated introduction to the discipline of sociology.

SOC 203. Sociology of Multiculturalism
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines conflict solutions in sustainable, structural, and ethical ways, particularly among individuals with membership in groups of diverse class, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, citizenship, and other identity backgrounds. It explores strategies that could turn stratified, dominant, and unjust differences into differences that enrich social relationships.

SOC 206. Animals and Society
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course sociologically examines the relationships that exist between humans and other non-human animals. It explores the legal, ethical, cultural, political, ecological, and social issues that underlie the concerns for and against animal rights and protections.

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics
(4; 3 in the half-term). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 250, 280, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265. Sociology majors should elect this course during their sophomore year. Honors majors should enroll in SOC 210, STATS 250 (350) or its equivalent prior to beginning the Honors course sequence in the winter term of the junior year.

A survey of the use of statistics in research. Students are introduced to descriptive measures and problems of inference in relation to a wide range of materials. An introduction to statistical packages on microcomputers is provided.

SOC 215 / ORGSTUDY 215. Organization and Society
One introductory course in Sociology. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted toward a concentration in Organizational Studies.

This class uses organizational sociology to examine how people?s actions create and are shaped by distinctive organizing principles, emergent social organization, and formal organizational structures. Organizing, organization, and organizations are examined in multiple social realms including business, sports, fashion, technology, and food.

SOC 218 / UC 218. Foundations of Intergroup Relations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This introductory course examines the theory behind how social identity groups form, how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination), and how people come to understand their own social identity group membership in the context of a society where privilege and power exist. Students can expect to participate in class through individual and group projects as well as class discussion.

SOC 220 / RCSSCI 220. Political Economy
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 222 / RCSSCI 222. Strategies in Social Interaction: An Introduction to Game Theory
(4). (SS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 250, 400, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or ECON 405, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

This course explores human society from the interdisciplinary social science perspective of contemporary game theory, the theory of strategies in social interaction. The course will combine a systematic exposition of elementary game theory with an examination of several applications in particular disciplines as well as experimental in class workshops.

SOC 230. Health and Population in South Africa
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar examines population and health in South Africa using a historical context. Students are encouraged to critically analyze factual information to understand different perspectives. The course is typically offered with the option of a trip to South Africa at the semester's end for two additional credits.

SOC 235. South Africa in Transition: Field Experience
Consent of instructor required. Enrollment is restricted to students who are enrolled in or have completed SOC 230 and have instructor permission. (2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The seminar entails a two-week trip to South Africa for students who complete SOC 230. The group travels to different parts of South Africa and meets with local experts and members of diverse population groups.

SOC 255. Sociology of Music
One course in sociology or musicology, or extensive personal background in music. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course draws on both theoretical and applied literature to explore the impact of social context on the production and experience of music as well as music's impact in various social environments. Popular and classical forms of music are examined.

SOC 260 / CMPLXSYS 260. Tipping Points, Bandwagons and Cascades: From Individual Behavior to Social Dynamics
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

In this class, we examine how interdependent behaviors of individuals can lead to some surprising and unexpected social outcomes. We will explore both theoretical models and empirical applications of social dynamics, including sexual networks and marriage markets, the formation and transformation of neighborhoods, the success or failure of social movements, and the diffusion of innovation.

SOC 270 / WOMENSTD 270. Gender and the Law
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores contemporary legal responses to gender inequality in the U.S., with particular attention to the ways that feminists have tried to use law for social change. Topics include equal protection under the U.S. constitution, sex and race discrimination on the job, pay equity, regulations of pregnancy and abortion, and transgender rights.

SOC 295. Topics in Sociology
(1 - 4). (SS). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

These courses address specific research problems currently under study by faculty members. Topics are announced each term in the Schedule of Classes.

SOC 300. Sociological Principles and Problems
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 100, 102, or 195.

An upper level introduction to the mode and procedure of sociological explanation in its major fields of theory and application. This class is appropriate for students with little social science background.

SOC 303 / AAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations
An introductory course in Sociology or AAS 201. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the tensions underlying American race and ethnic relations. Students use theoretical debates, historical, social and political meanings of race and ethnicity, and the study of how various racial and ethnic groups construct and use their social identities to examine the processes that facilitate or impede intergroup relations.

SOC 304 / AMCULT 304. American Immigration
One introductory course in Sociology or American Culture. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

As America is a nation of immigrants, this course surveys the immigrant past of ethnic groups such as the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Surveying these varied ethnic histories, we analyze them from contrasting theoretical perspectives on race and ethnic relations, theories of assimilation, internal colonialism, etc. We seek to understand what is unique to and shared among these experiences.

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory
At least one course in introductory sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to sociological theory. It covers both classical and contemporary theories, paying particular attention to their role in research settings. Most spaces are reserved for concentrators.

SOC 310. Sociological Research Methods
Sociology concentrator. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Sociology majors are strongly encouraged to elect SOC 310 in their junior year. Honor majors should elect this course prior to or concurrently with SOC 497 (the first required course in the Sociology Honors sequence). (4; 3 in the half-term). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed SOC 312. Meets the sociology Research Methods Requirement. It is highly recommended that sociology majors not elect both SOC 305 and SOC 310 in the same term.

This course explores the basic methods of sociological research. Students will examine the relationship between social theory and research, the research process, choosing a sample, conditions for inferring causation, and methods of data collection, along with the applications and ethics of sociological research.

SOC 313 / RCSSCI 301. Social Science Theory I: From Social Contract to Oedipus Complex
At least one 200-level social science course. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the origins and early development of social science thinking, focusing on political economy, sociology, and psychology. The course provides students with an introduction to the theoretical foundations of social science thinking and how all such thinking is shaped and limited by its social and historical context.

SOC 315. Economic Sociology
One introductory course in sociology, economics, or political science. (3 - 4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an integrated view of the interactions between formal organizations and socio political systems. It examines large, diversified modern corporate organizations, explicitly recognizing the constraints imposed by modern states and advanced capitalism. The course integrates literature from sociology, political science, and economics and includes historical studies and cross national comparisons.

SOC 320 / PSYCH 310 / UC 320. Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to give students a foundation in the skills and knowledge needed to facilitate multicultural group interactions, including structured intergroup dialogues. Topics include: basic group facilitation skills and their applications to multicultural settings; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; etc.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311 / UC 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor. (4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 or SOC 320, and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students also participate in weekly supervision seminars to discuss their work in the dialogue groups. They also discuss theory and practice of group observation, in-out group conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication, and community building.

SOC 324 / PSYCH 324 / UC 324. Advanced Practicum in Intergroup Relations
Consent of instructor required. UC 320/PSYCH 310/SOC 320. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

This course is for students doing advanced applied work in intergroup relations.

SOC 325. Sociology of Service Learning
Consent of instructor required. (4). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is designed to give students a formal sociological foundation in the dynamics of student in small groups and in community service learning. It will prepare students to effectively facilitate undergraduate learning in community learning courses (such as SOC 389).

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective
One introductory course in Sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 344 will provide a sociological examination of marriage and family patterns. The course will study family and marriage structures, processes, relationships, and changes. A particular focus of the class is the relationship between marriage and family structures and the larger social system. The course will examine social and personal influences on marriage and family processes as well as the way family processes influence other aspects of personal and social life.

SOC 345 / WOMENSTD 348. Sociology of Sexuality
One introductory course in Sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to the sociology of sexuality in contemporary American society. Different theoretical perspectives for thinking about sexuality in the social sciences will be examined, issues of studying sexuality empirically will be reviewed, and how people construct a variety of social identities and relationships will be explored.

SOC 346. Sociology of the Body
One introductory course in Sociology or Women's Studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores how bodies have been identified, interpreted, and represented throughout history, particularly the West from the 19th century onward when the body became the contested arena of debates concerning sex and desire, gender and race, citizenship, and labor and reproduction.

SOC 350. Human Rights in the United Nations
One introductory course in sociology, political science, or other disciplines that examine human rights and globalization. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines how various human rights problems in the world (such as genocide, women's rights, and poverty) are discussed and acted on in the United Nations. Students are engaged in weekly video conference sessions with a representative from the United Nations headquarters in New York.

SOC 354. Law and Society
One introductory course in any social science discipline. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for students who have taken SOC 454 prior to Fall 2013.

This course explores theoretical perspectives on the connection between law and society; explanations for legal compliance, deviance, and resistance; the relationship between "law on the books" and "law in action;" the relationship between law and social change; and law's ubiquitous role in popular culture.

SOC 368. Criminology
One introductory course in sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The analysis of criminal behavior in relationship to the institutional framework of society. Emphasis upon the more routinized and persistent forms of criminality along with the joint roles played by victims, the criminal, the police and all the other relevant parties.

SOC 375 / PSYCH 312 / UC 375. Intergroup Conflict and Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity and Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines examples of social conflict based on religion, ethnicity and culture, interdisciplinary theories that help to understand the nature of such conflict, and current coalition building and coexistence work among various religious, ethnic and cultural groups. Experiential activities enhance learning about intergroup conflict and coexistence work.

SOC 379 / GERMAN 379 / POLSCI 386. Sports, Politics, and Society
One introductory course in sociology or political science. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for those who have completed SOC 212/GERMAN 212.

This course embraces broadly-based theories of society and politics to comparatively examine sports in the U.S. and Europe. Sports are closely tied to societal values on both sides of the Atlantic and furnish an excellent example for the study of popular attitudes and behavior.

SOC 380 / ENVIRON 345 / POLSCI 331. Environmental Public Opinion Analysis
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines trends in environmental public opinion, influences on people's concerns about the environment, the depth and strength of concerns, and how environmental concerns affect personal behaviors and the political process. It also introduces students to useful statistical concepts and procedures for analyzing and interpreting public opinion data.

SOC 383 / PSYCH 383. Introduction to Survey Research I
PSYCH 280. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology
(2 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a major in Sociology. A maximum of four credits of SOC 389 may be included in a major in sociology. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

SOC 389 is known as "Project Community." Students combine approximately 4 hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving.

SOC 392 / HISTORY 332 / POLSCI 395 / REEES 395 / SLAVIC 395. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor. F.

SOC 393 / HISTORY 333 / POLSCI 396 / REEES 396 / SLAVIC 396. Survey of Central and Eastern Europe and the Enlarged European Union
(3 - 4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor.

An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Central and Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world, especially with regard to the European Union.

SOC 394. Undergraduate Research
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Undergraduate research is an opportunity for declared sociology concentrators to earn academic credit by assisting with ongoing research projects with departmental faculty.

SOC 395. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. Enrollment requires departmental application and permission of supervising faculty. Students must have completed at least one introductory sociology course and one sociology course at the 300 level or above to apply. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Independent study is an avenue for students to work one-on-one with a Sociology faculty member on a mutually agreed topic. Students are strongly encouraged to seek a supervising faculty member one semester prior to the intended study.

SOC 396. Undergraduate Internship
Consent of department required. Restricted to Sociology concentrators. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 324, 389, 394, 395, and 396 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Academic credit for a prearranged internship experience that lasts at least four weeks and includes a minimum of 100 hours of work. Application required. Credit will not be granted retroactively.

SOC 398. Professional Writing and Sociology
SOC 100 or SOC 102 or SOC 195 or SOC 300 completed with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students should have taken an introductory sociology course (SOC 100, 102, 195 or 300) and at least 2 sociology electives. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Sociological ideas are not used only by academic sociologists. In this course students learn a variety of writing skills and forms that they can take beyond college: Op Eds, book reviews, literature reviews, policy briefs, grant proposals, and/or blogs. Students also produce and describe graphic reports from social science data.

SOC 410 / JUDAIC 410. Sociology of the American Jewish Community
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course reviews sociological literature on the American Jewish community, explores current issues, and examines the conflicts and struggles of American Jews as they strive to maintain their identity in a pluralistic society.

SOC 411 / COMM 411. Mass Communication and Public Opinion
COMM 261 strongly recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed COMM 485/SOC 463, Mass Communication and Public Opinion (Crse ID #006247).

This course explores enduring research questions concerning mass communication and public opinion. Emphasis is given to recent research dealing with the impact of the media on public opinion.

SOC 415. Culture and Consumption
One introductory course in sociology, psychology, or anthropology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Students study why individuals desire the things they do and how consumption affects the identities and the inequalities among persons, places, and things. What are the social origins and orientations of consumption? Is fair trade possible in a materially unequal world?

SOC 422. Sociology of Latin America
One introductory course in Sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course approaches Latin America through the lens of politics, often from a comparative and historical perspective. Drawing examples from various countries over a 200 year period, it examines such sociological issues as colonialism, race, class, nationalism, the nation state, democracy, international influences, contentious politics, and social movements.

SOC 423 / AMCULT 421. Stratification
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to sociological concepts and theories of social stratification.

SOC 428 / ASIAN 490 / PUBPOL 428. Contemporary China
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a general but systematic introduction to contemporary China. It covers its history, cultural practices, government, economy, and family structure. Special attention is given to the various domains of daily life, including education, work, income, health, leisure, marriage, housing, and psychological wellbeing.

SOC 429. Sociology of Japan
One introductory course in Sociology, Anthropology, Political Science, or Economics. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Examination of contemporary Japanese society from a sociological perspective, using empirical data such as statistics and ethnographic accounts as well as visual aids such as movies, photos, and video clips. Topics include education, gender, family, ethnic diversity, politics, diplomacy, media and popular culture.

SOC 430. World Population Dynamics
(3). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 530.

This course introduces students to the basics of demographic measurement and population change theory while focusing on how to examine empirical information about populations to draw informed conclusions about current world population trends. Students will learn how to assess the validity of media reports on population issues.

SOC 434 / AAS 434. Social Organization of Black Communities
Introduction to SOC or introduction to AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 435. Urban Inequality and Conflict
One course in introductory sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who are enrolled in or have completed SOC 535.

Examines the social and spatial factors affecting the location, social organization, structure, and functioning of American cities in relation to their internal arrangements and external connections.

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender
One introductory course in sociology or women's studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course asks: Why is there gender inequality? and what are women's experiences of that inequality? The course will examine politics, the state, work, family, body, and sexuality, all areas of social life that have been theorized as the locus of women's oppression.

SOC 450 / POLSCI 450. Political Sociology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to basic concepts in political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationships between the global expansion of capitalism, the revolutionary transformation of societies, and the rise of modern political systems.

SOC 451 / WOMENSTD 451. Women and Work
WOMENSTD 240 (or AMCULT 240) or SOC 100, and one other course in SOC or WOMENSTD. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will draw on empirical research and theory to analyze a wide range of issues regarding gender and work.

SOC 455 / RELIGION 455. Religion and Society
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to concepts and theories that apply to the sociological analysis of religion.

SOC 458. Sociology of Education
One introductory course in Sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers educational institutions as social organizations: relationship to society, various roles within educational institutions, and relationship of individuals from various backgrounds to K-12 and higher education experiences. Comparative examples are drawn from various societies as a basis for cross-cultural generalizations about the social role of educational systems.

SOC 461. Social Movements
One introductory course in Sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 465 / PSYCH 488 / WOMENSTD 465. Sociological Analysis of Deviance
One introductory course in sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a sociological examination of the social construction of deviant categories and their consequences, using analysis of conventional values and modes of social control. Students are expected to develop a critical perspective and facilitate reflective thought about deviance.

SOC 472 / PSYCH 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology
STATS 250(350) or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) PSYCH 280. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement. F, W, Su.

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. Students are introduced to different research methods and concepts, learn to collect and analyze survey data, and conduct an original, experimental research project. In this project (topic varies), students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report.

SOC 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides students with an understanding of the influence of social and cultural factors on health, illness, and medical care.

SOC 476. Sociology of Bioethics
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the following topics: social sources of morality; organization of professions; politics of science, medicine, and biotechnology; interface between law and ethics; place of religion in pluralist societies; sociology of science; and social uses of bioethics.

SOC 488. Organizing Internship
Consent of department required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Students serve as "organizing interns" with a community organization for a minimum of 10 hours per week. They may accept one of the placements arranged by the instructor, or develop their own internship or project in close consultation with the instructor. Appropriate projects require mobilizing the participation of others to achieve measurable organizing outcomes by the end of the semester. This focus on community organizing distinguishes this course from most other service-learning courses on campus, which tend to focus on community service.

SOC 489. Organizing: People, Power, and Change
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to community organizing. Topics covered include: the definition of community organizing; the role of the organizer; motivating collective action through values, narratives, and interests; resources and power; leadership development; building community capacity; strategy and tactics; campaigns; and organizational structure and governance.

SOC 490 / REEES 490 / WOMENSTD 492. Women and Islam: A Sociological Perspective
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 495. Topics in Sociology
One introductory course in Sociology. (1 - 4; 1 - 3 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This topics course addresses specific research problems currently under study by faculty members.

SOC 497. Honors: Proposal Writing
Honors Sociology concentrators and [SOC 210 or STATS 350]. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. W.

SOC 497 is the first of the required three-course sequence for the Honors Program in Sociology (SOC 497, 498, 499). The seminar's focus is on defining a research question and preparing a research prospectus. SOC 497 is offered only in the winter term.

SOC 498. Honors: Data Collection and Analysis
SOC 497. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 498 is the second of the required three-course sequence for the Honors Program in Sociology and focuses on the collection and analysis of thesis data. Students work primarily on an independent basis, with input from their faculty mentor.

SOC 499. Honors: Thesis Writing
SOC 498. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

SOC 499 is the final of the required three-course sequence for the Honors Program in Sociology (SOC 497, 498, 499). The seminar focuses on the completion of the undergraduate thesis. Students work primarily on an independent basis, with consistent input from their faculty mentor. Students also meet individually with the faculty honors program coordinator and as a cohort group to discuss their research and writing experiences.

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