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Courses in LSA University Courses
University Courses (UC)
UC 101 / NAVSCI 102. Seapower and Maritime Affairs
(2). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the historical role of sea power, emphasizing the U.S. Navy. Topics include: development of naval power and applications as an instrument of foreign policy; historical relationship of navies with their respective domestic, political, and economic environments; and the rise of the U.S. as a maritime power.

UC 102. Michigan Community Scholars Program: The Student in the University
Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. (1). May not be repeated for credit. F. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course introduces first-year participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program to the academic, civic, and cultural resources available at the University and in the community. In addition to enabling students to make a successful transition to college, the goal is to engage them in a community of academicians and leaders pursuing excellence in all areas of endeavor.

UC 103. Michigan Community Scholars Program: Academic Decision Making
Admission to the Michigan Community Scholars Program. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course will provides participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program with an opportunity to critically review the roles of leadership and decision making related to their academic and professional careers. It allows students to consider various theoretical perspectives and link them to civic responsibility and social change.

UC 104. Introduction to Research
Participant in Michigan Research Community. (1). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This one-credit course is required for all first-year students enrolled in the MRC. In preparation for a year-long research project, students are introduced to research ethics and exposed to a variety of different research methodologies employed in disciplines across campus. Students examine the building blocks for critical thinking skills through reading assignments and classroom activities. They learn how to read professional journal articles, formulate questions, and how to evaluate arguments and evidence. Small group activities focus on team work and oral communication skills necessary to be successful in the classroom, research lab, and work place.

UC 105. Health Sciences Scholars Program: Perspectives on Health and Health Care
Restricted to students enrolled in the Health Sciences Scholars Program. (2). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an overview of major current health and health care issues. Students exchange ideas and experiences with faculty from a broad spectrum of health-related fields. Faculty engage the students in consideration of the cultural, political, socioeconomic, and personal dimensions of health as well as the options and issues facing those who manage, provide, and evaluate healthcare. This is the first of two core courses for students in the Health Sciences Scholars Program and is open only to students in HSSP.

UC 106. Perspectives on Health Care
Restricted to students enrolled in the Health Sciences Scholars Program. (2). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

UC 106 is a continuation of UC 105. It provides students with an overview of the cultural, socioeconomic, and political dimensions of health, encourages the development of an individual model of health, and provides a realistic perspective on various disciplines in the health sciences.

UC 107. Women in Science and Engineering Residence Program Seminar
Participant in the WISE Residence Program. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

The Women in Science and Engineering Residence Program Seminar is a required one-credit course for all first-year students enrolled in the WISE RP. Through a combination of short lectures and classroom activities it exposes students to the intellectual life at the University of Michigan and what it means to pursue a liberal arts education. Selected faculty members share their current research with students as well as their career paths and professional development. In addition, students learn the building blocks for critical thinking skills through reading assignments and classroom activities. Students also learn how to read professional journal articles, formulate questions, and evaluate arguments and evidence. Small group activities focus on team work and the oral communication skills necessary to be successful in the classroom, research lab, and work place.

UC 108. STEM Challenges/STEM Success
Completion of UC 107. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Participation in the WISE Residence Program. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a follow up to UC 107. Students will continue to explore many of the STEM disciplines and the key areas of focus within each discipline. In addition, students will learn the key components of researching a topic, including locating academic sources, reading and analyzing those sources and presenting their findings.

UC 110 / SI 110. Introduction to Information Studies
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?), to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-shrinking and knowledge-building technologies such as telephones?), to the practical (what are the basic architecture of computing networks?). Successful completion of this "gateway" course.

UC 122 / PSYCH 122 / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogues
(2). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. May not be used as a prerequisite for, or included in a major in Psychology. May not be included in a major in Sociology.

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context.

UC 145 / GEOG 145 / INTLSTD 101. Introduction to International Studies
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. Meets the geography requirement for public teacher certification in the School of Education.

The purpose of this course is to explore the ways in which ideas, people, goods, services, diseases, and natural resources have flowed across political and cultural borders during human history, to examine the consequences of those flows, and to understand how an interest in these topics can be the basis of a professional career.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing. UC 150, UC 151, UC 152, and UC 153 differ only in their area distribution designation.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing.

UC 152. First-Year Natural Science Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing.

UC 153. First-Year Composition Seminar
Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (FYWR). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing.

UC 154. First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to introduce entering students to the intellectual life of the university in a small course taught by an experienced member of the faculty. Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussion and regular practice in writing.

UC 163. Biotechnology and Human Values
First-year students only. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The primary purpose of this course is to teach a basic vocabulary in biotechnology and expose students to the breadth of biotechnology and its impact on our daily lives. Topics will cover a broad range of applications in genetics, molecular diagnostics, molecular imaging, and clinical devices. A key additional component will be to investigate human values issues, such as ethical questions and cost effectiveness, arising from these technologies.

UC 170. UC Special Topics
(1 - 3). May be elected twice for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is intended to house interdisciplinary courses that do not fit into any specific department or courses taught by non-LSA faculty from various units across the university.

UC 174. Digital Research: Critical Concepts and Strategies
(1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in UC 170, UC 175-176, or UC 177. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This hands-on computer lab will help students lay a solid foundation for success in all current and future academic research. With an emphasis on the wealth of digital resources now available, the material focuses on information discovery and management skills, expands knowledge of scholarly sources, and promotes critical thinking. Specific topics include resource availability, source selection, search strategies, content evaluation, referencing, and academic integrity. Taught by a University librarian, the interactive format allows students to learn via database searches, group discussion, and case studies. Students work individually and collaboratively on reports, reading assignments, and projects.

UC 178. Global Understanding
Consent of instructor required. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course offers a unique opportunity for students to engage in intercultural communication with college students in other parts of the world without having to leave the classroom. Intercultural exchange is conducted using written communications (online chatting and collaborative paper assignments) and "face-to-face" real time group discussions via video conference.

UC 201 / AERO 201. U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power
AERO 102/Permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

Examines the development of aviation from the 18th century, from balloons and dirigibles, to the present, and how technology has effected growth and development of air power; traces use and development of air power through WWs I and II, the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, employment in relief missions and civic action programs in the late 1960s, and employment in military actions concluding with Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

UC 202 / AERO 202. U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power
Permission of instructor. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

UC 203 / MILSCI 201. Innovative Tactical Leadership
(1). May not be repeated for credit. Counts as credit toward LSA degree.

This course considers military government leadership with a focus on leadership development and interpersonal and group dynamics. It explores the dimensions of creative and innovative tactical leadership strategies and styles through lecture, historical case studies, and interactive student exercises.

UC 204 / MILSCI 202. Leadership in Changing Environments
Permission of professor. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Counts as credit toward LSA degree.

This course examines the challenges of leading in complex contemporary operational environments. Dimensions of the cross-cultural challenges of leadership in a constantly changing world are highlighted and applied to practical Army leadership tasks and situations.

UC 205 / NAVSCI 203. Leadership and Management
NAVSCI 101,102 OR PI. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is specifically designed to teach introductory-level leadership and management concepts and applications to sophomore-level university students. The course starts with a basic overview of leadership and management and then moves into basic skills including professional reading, writing, briefings, problem solving, team building, situational leadership, morality, ethics, and communications. After the basic skills are covered, the curriculum explores leader-subordinate and peer relationships, while taking an in-depth look at professional and unprofessional relationships. The course emphasizes ethics in leadership and management and explores subjects in power and influence, counseling, supervision, accountability, responsibility, and core values.

UC 210 / CSP 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care
Consent of instructor required. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Underclass students are given a relatively early opportunity to consider some of the large, general questions relating to medicine. The seminar deals with a variety of topics that are central to health care professions and to the nature of research in related fields.

UC 215 / SEAS 215. Contemporary Social Issues in Southeast Asia
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Southeast Asia is at the center of world developments best addressed from multiple disciplines (law, business, politics, sociology, health, anthropology). This course explores a number of factors that can produce significant social shifts: democracy and human rights, rapid economic growth, globalization, technological change, urbanization, migration, religious and ethnic tensions, environmental degradation, AIDS and avian flu, and youth culture.

UC 218 / SOC 218. Foundations of Intergroup Relations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This introductory course examines the theory behind how social identity groups form, how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination), and how people come to understand their own social identity group membership in the context of a society where privilege and power exist. Students can expect to participate in class through individual and group projects as well as class discussion.

UC 225. Undergraduate Internship
Consent of department required. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course allows LSA undergraduates to receive course credit for experiential learning in an unpaid internship. During the internship, students are expected to maintain a journal. After the internship, they write a brief 5-6 page essay summarizing the work done and evaluating the significance of the experience. Employers must provide a brief letter describing their work and evaluating their contributions. Students may register for the course either during the semester in which they do the work or the following semester.

UC 227. Practicum
(1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected three times for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This practicum focuses on active and engaged learning associated with a student's course of study. It involves supervised applications of previously studied principles and methods in challenging field settings.

UC 250. Sophomore Humanities Seminar
Completion of FYWR. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Taught by a regular faculty member. Course content focuses on central topics and theories in the disciplines and introduces students to the teaching and practicing of critical reading, in addition to and in correlation with the heavy emphasis on writing. The course also includes practice in the skills of verbal presentation and discussion; critical thinking is emphasized and practiced.

UC 252. Sophomore Natural Science Seminar
Completion of FYWR. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Taught by a regular faculty member. Course content focuses on central topics and theories in the disciplines and introduces students to the teaching and practicing of critical reading, in addition to and in correlation with the heavy emphasis on writing. The course also includes practice in the skills of verbal presentation and discussion; critical thinking is emphasized and practiced.

UC 254. Sophomore Interdisciplinary Seminar
Completion of FYWR. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the questions and methods characteristic of the major disciplines - humanities, natural sciences, social sciences. It uses an interdisciplinary approach to address complex topics using tools such as: critical reading of multiple kinds of texts; an emphasis on written and oral presentations; and a robust exchange of reflections and ideas, both in class and on-line.

UC 256. Twenty Two Ways
(3). (ID). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This topics course, designed for sophomore exploration, provides a multidisciplinary investigation of natural science, social science, and humanities approaches to issues surrounding food. Featuring single lectures from the College's best teachers, the course offers students perspectives on health, environment, social relations, economics, politics, and culture.

UC 270. University Courses Special Topics
(1 - 3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is intended to house interdisciplinary courses that do not fit into any specific department or courses taught by non-LSA faculty from various units across the university.

UC 275. Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

UC 275 is an interdisciplinary experiential introduction to intercultural learning that prepares diverse undergraduate students from various colleges for field experience interactions, and then helps students bring these experiences back to campus in socially and academically productive ways. It is a series of concentrated seminars of orientation, debriefing, and symposium.

UC 276. GIEU Leadership Seminar
Consent of instructor required. (2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates (GIEU) Leadership Seminar provides leadership training and experience for exceptional students nominated by faculty from those having completed UC 275.

UC 280. Undergraduate Research
Consent of instructor required. First or second year standing. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of 8 credits in any UROP research courses. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

This course offers research experience to first- and second-year students in an area of mutual interest to the student and to faculty member from any unit in the University. The course is intended for use when departmental offerings do not accommodate a student's needs.

UC 285. Introduction to Intercultural Study
Consent of instructor required. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected four times for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This interdisciplinary experiential course introduces students to intercultural learning. It prepares students to make the most of their off-campus field study opportunities through identifying and setting goals, developing skills for cross-cultural learning and adaptation, and formulating plans to put those skills to good use on site.

UC 286. Reflective Intercultural Study
Consent of instructor required. Students must be concurrently enrolled in an off-campus field learning experience. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected four times for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This interdisciplinary experiential course is designed to assist students involved in intercultural field learning in developing skilled local interactions, identifying new learning and interactive possibilities on site, sharing strategies for handling conflicts, unexpected situations, and misunderstandings, and well as those for capitalizing on local field opportunities. Students learn how to cultivate the documentation and implementation of their own experiential growth and development in intercultural environments.

UC 287. Integrative Intercultural Study
Consent of instructor required. Immediate past participation in off-campus experiential field-learning opportunity. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected four times for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This interdisciplinary course is designed to assist students integrate what they have learned from their intercultural field experiences. It also helps students to build on acquired skills and experiences in academic and co-curricular programs on the Ann Arbor campus and to prepare for future academic, programmatic, and career pursuits.

UC 299. Directed Study
Permission of instructor. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty.

UC 300. College Practicum
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

For an activity or internship clearly linked some aspect of the student's course of study but not covered by a departmental experiential course number. The project must be approved in advance and recommended by a faculty sponsor who agrees to evaluate the experience and the work submitted by the student.

UC 301 / MILSCI 301. Leading Small Organizations I
Permission of Army OEP chair. (2). May not be repeated for credit. Counts for credit toward LSA degree.

This course is a continuation to the study of military organizational leadership focusing on leadership development and interpersonal and group dynamics. Lecture-discussion course (with lab) provides insights into methods of visualizing, planning and leading organizations to achieve set goals.

UC 302 / MILSCI 302. Leading Small Organizations II
MILSCI 301/UC 301. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Permission of program chairman. (2). May not be repeated for credit. Counts as LSA credit toward LSA degree.

This course is a continuation of the study of organizational leadership focusing on organizational behavior as well as interpersonal and small group relationships. This lecture-discussion course (with lab) provides the student with an insight into formal methods of visualizing, planning, and leading organizations to achieve set goals.

UC 309 / AERO 310. Air Force Leadership and Management
AERO 202/P.I. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Counts for credit toward LSA degree.

The concepts, principles, and techniques of leadership are presented within the framework of behavioral theories. Emphasis on the leader, group, situation, and their interaction as dynamic factors in an organizational environment. Historical overview of managerial development throughout recorded history with emphasis on the social and physical setting in which the manager operates. The curriculum includes effective communications, decision making, planning, and strategic management.

UC 310 / NAVSCI 310. Evolution of Warfare
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Counts for credit toward LSA degree.

Introduction to the history, development and innovations in warfare. The student acquires a general background and insight into the effect that society and technology has had on the evolution of warfare. There is a critical analysis of the changes in warfare, the changes in the views on war, and the thoughts and actions of military leaders and writers.

UC 320 / PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to give students a foundation in the skills and knowledge needed to facilitate multicultural group interactions, including structured intergroup dialogues. Topics include: basic group facilitation skills and their applications to multicultural settings; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; etc.

UC 321 / PSYCH 311 / SOC 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor. (4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 or SOC 320, and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students also participate in weekly supervision seminars to discuss their work in the dialogue groups. They also discuss theory and practice of group observation, in-out group conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication, and community building.

UC 324 / PSYCH 324 / SOC 324. Advanced Practicum in Intergroup Relations
Consent of instructor required. UC 320/PSYCH 310/SOC 320. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

This course is for students doing advanced applied work in intergroup relations.

UC 325. IGR Directed Study
UC 324. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected eight times for credit.

Supervised study in an area related to the IGR Program as agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty.

UC 327. Advanced Practicum
(1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected three times for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This advanced practicum focuses on active and engaged learning associated with a student's course of study and involves supervised applications of previously studied principles and methods in challenging field settings.

UC 370. UC Special Topics
(1 - 3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is intended to house interdisciplinary courses that do not fit into any specific department or courses taught by non-LSA faculty from various units across the university.

UC 371. The Measure of Our Meals: Food Studies Research Methods
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar explores methods used to understand the many facets of food production, distribution, and consumption. Topics addressed include measurements of environmental impact, ethnographic research on eating practices, how to interpret food films and advertisements, and writing the history of food technologies. We read outstanding scholarship and conduct original research.

UC 375 / PSYCH 312 / SOC 375. Intergroup Conflict and Coexistence: Religion, Ethnicity and Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines examples of social conflict based on religion, ethnicity and culture, interdisciplinary theories that help to understand the nature of such conflict, and current coalition building and coexistence work among various religious, ethnic and cultural groups. Experiential activities enhance learning about intergroup conflict and coexistence work.

UC 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language
Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). May be elected six times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

UC 399. Directed Study
Permission of instructor. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty.

UC 401 / MILSCI 401. Leadership and Management
MILSCI 302 or UC 302. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Permission of chair of Army OEP. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

This course studies military leadership, with a focus on development and interpersonal and group dynamics. Lecture-discussion course (with lab) provides insights into methods of visualizing, planning, and leading to achieve set goals.

UC 402 / MILSCI 402. Military Professionalism and Professional Ethics
MILSCI 401/UC 401. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (2). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an interdisciplinary course that integrates history, political science, ethics and morality, law, leadership and management. It prepares students to ethically lead and manage complex organizations by focusing on the moral, ethical, legal, and regulatory aspects of being a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army.

UC 403 / NAVSCI 402. Leadership and Ethics
NAVSCI 203. Non-ROTC students need permission of instructor. (2). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on ethical decision-making in the military and civilian environment. Classes include lecture, case studies, presentations, videos, guest lecturers, and group discussion. The course introduces a series of ethical theories and decision systems, incorporating concepts from a variety of disciplines: leadership, ethics, western philosophy, theology, and law.

UC 406 / MUSMETH 406. Special Problems in Museum Methods
(3). May be elected twice for credit.

Theory and laboratory practice in the reproduction of natural objects, the design of natural science exhibits. Special emphasis is given to the problems and interests of those teaching science or nature interpretation. Students desiring instruction and guidance in special fields of museum methods may also elect this course.

UC 410 / NAVSCI 410. Amphibious Warfare
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Counts for credit toward LSA degree.

Exploration of the history, development, and techniques of amphibious operations to enable the student to acquire a general background in amphibious operations.

UC 415. Methods in Research for the Natural Sciences
Consent of department required. (1). (BS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course covers the approaches to conducting research in the natural sciences. It includes the tools and methods of research, the processes for performing research, and the mechanisms for communicating research results. The responsible conduct of research is discussed.

UC 416. Methods in Research for the Social Sciences
Consent of department required. (1). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course covers the approaches to conducting research in the social sciences. It includes the tools and methods of research, the processes for performing research, and the mechanisms for communicating research results. The responsible conduct of research is discussed.

UC 421. Field Practicum in a University Setting
Consent of instructor required. (2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Using the social psychology of intergroup relations as the framework, this course prepares undergraduates who will serve as residence hall staff the following year to create effective multicultural communities within the residence halls.

UC 427. Capstone Practicum
(1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This capstone practicum focuses on active and engaged learning associated with a student's course of study and involves supervised applications of previously studied principles and methods in challenging field settings.

UC 455. IMP Senior Seminar
Consent of department required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed for seniors in the Individual Major Program (IMP). Its main goal is to address what it means to study across disciplines and how to effectively integrate knowledge from various disciplines represented in each student's individual IMP. What are the interdisciplinary research methods that allow synthesizing the ideas, theories, and concepts from multiple disciplines?

UC 470. UC Special Topics
(1 - 3). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course is intended to house interdisciplinary courses that do not fit into any specific department or courses taught by non-LSA faculty from various units across the university.

UC 499. Directed Study
Permission of instructor. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty.

UC 500 / BIOMEDE 500. Biomedical Engineering Seminar
(1). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This seminar will feature various bioengineering-related speakers.

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