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Courses in LSA Women's Studies

Women’s Studies offers students the opportunity to study the systems of gender, politics, and representation that shape women’s lives. As a discipline, Women’s Studies asks:

  • How does being a woman affect one’s participation in the family, economy, politics, art, and literature?
  • How do language, belief, and visual representation convey meaning about women’s and men’s status in society?
  • How has that status changed historically?
  • How does the experience of women vary by class, race, nationality, and sexual orientation?

Questions like these have produced an extensive body of scholarship that puts gender at the center of analysis.

Areas of Women's Studies

LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer) and Sexuality Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to sexuality that includes topics such as religious beliefs, legal codes, medical constructions, and social movements, and recognizes them as historically variable and culturally specific. With the contributions of empirical research, feminist scholarship, and queer theory, courses in this area acquaint students with history of sexuality and understanding the formation of sexual identities and sexuality.

Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S. examines the intersection of gender, race, and ethnicity in order to consider differences among women and men, as well as the impact of multiple categories of identity on experience and on the formation and contestation of gender itself. Interracial and interethnic relations, the mutual influence of social movements, and racialized genders are also explored. Although the U.S. is the primary focus, consideration of various diasporas encourages analysis of the links between communities across national borders.

Gender, Culture and Representation explores ways in which ideas and meanings about women and gender are produced culturally and historically. It positions students as readers, viewers, and interpreters of cultures and cultural artifacts, especially in the domains of literature, philosophy, the visual and performing arts, mass media (including film), and their histories. Courses might explore a particular historical topic from a feminist perspective. Others might introduce students to feminist analyses of past and/or contemporary cultural forms and encourage them to consider processes of viewing, writing, and producing knowledge.

Gender in the Global Context offers a comparative cross-cultural perspective on the construction and meaning of gender, race, class, and sexuality. It examines current forces of globalization and empire, the histories of imperialism and colonialism, and postcolonial resistance and theory. Courses decenter the U.S. while placing it in a geopolitical context, including global and transnational feminisms.

Women's Studies (WOMENSTD)
WOMENSTD 150. Humanities Seminars on Women and Gender
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

WOMENSTD 151. Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

WOMENSTD 152. Natural Sciences Seminar on Women and Gender
First year seminar. First year student only, including students with sophomore standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-year seminar on a topic within interdisciplinary Women's Studies scholarship. Topics will be thematic and focus on natural sciences issues and research concerning women and gender.

WOMENSTD 212 / ANTHRCUL 212 / NURS 225. The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. Provides basic information about the history, biology, politics, and culture of AIDS, surveys the current state of the epidemic in different parts of the globe, and describes how the epidemic has been shaped by gender, poverty, and other structures of social inequality.

WOMENSTD 213. Topics in Gender and the Humanities
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course takes up a topic in gender and the humanities of a specific or contemporary nature.

WOMENSTD 220 / NURS 220. Perspectives in Women's Health
(3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Health).

A feminist perspective on concepts and issues in women's individual and aggregate health. Course will include definitions of women's health, women's health concerns, and impact of multiple factors on health.

WOMENSTD 225 / PSYCH 225. Psychology of Human Sexuality
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course addresses social and psychological aspects of sexuality, including sexual orientations, sexual adjustment and satisfaction, alternative sexuality's, sexually transmitted infections, sexual disorders, sex work and the social construction of sexuality.

WOMENSTD 235 / AMCULT 235 / ARABAM 235. From Harems to Terrorists: Representing the Middle East in Hollywood Cinema
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

An overview of representations of Arabs and Arab-Americans in Hollywood cinema over the last century. Course traces a shift in stereotypes from the rich Arab sheik with a harem to the Arab terrorist, examining the connection between representations and the historical-political moment in which they are created, from European colonialism to 9/11.

WOMENSTD 239 / AMCULT 239. Gender, Sexuality, and Health in America
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores gender, sexuality, and health in America over time and in terms of contemporary issues and controversies.

WOMENSTD 240 / AMCULT 240. Introduction to Women's Studies
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

WOMENSTD 242 / AMCULT 242. Gender Violence in a Global Context
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Students will study various human rights debates related to racial, sexist, and homophobic violence on a global scale. Course themes include: human trafficking; law enforcement and criminal justice-based violence; armed conflict and war; medicalized violence; and socio-economic violence. Students will learn to apply course material to their analysis of and involvement in the world around us. Course materials draw upon several disciplines ranging from anthropology and sociology to cultural studies, literature, and film and incorporate scholarly studies as well as policy, advocacy, and community-based based publications and reports.

WOMENSTD 243 / AMCULT 243 / LATINOAM 243. Latina Women in the U.S.
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will serve to introduce the study of gender, culture, and identity among Latinas in the U.S. It will grapple with the cultural forces that have historically created and re-created Latina identities.

WOMENSTD 245. Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender and Queer Studies
(4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit. (LGBTQ and Sexuality Studies).

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the study of sexualities from the perspective of lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual and transgender scholarship. Throughout we will consider the interplay between sexualities and differences of ethnicity, culture, race, class, and gender.

WOMENSTD 250. Race, Gender and Nation
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the study of race and gender in comparative contexts. Topics include colonialism, inequality, the politics of prisons, militarization, human rights, visual culture and a focus on women of color and Third World feminist thought. The course adopts both a comparative perspective (for countries such as the United States, Egypt, India, and Brazil) and a transnational perspective on contemporary issues.

WOMENSTD 253. Special Topics
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 7 credits. A maximum of seven credits of WOMENSTD 252 and 253 may be counted toward graduation.

This course will take up a single topic of a very specific or contemporary nature.

WOMENSTD 254 / HISTART 254. Introduction to Gender and the Arts
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to gender issues in a range of art forms: literature, music, theater, film, dance, and visual arts. We consider how performances of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality intersect with race, class, and ethnicity. Then we think about how these issues are produced and received by artists and audiences in the past and present.

WOMENSTD 257. Special Topics in the Social Sciences
(3 - 4). (SS). May be elected twice for credit.

This course considers a specific or contemporary social science topic.

WOMENSTD 258. Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Women's Studies
(3 - 4). (ID). May be elected twice for credit.

This course considers an interdisciplinary topic in women's and gender studies.

WOMENSTD 270 / SOC 270. Gender and the Law
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores contemporary legal responses to gender inequality in the U.S., with particular attention to the ways that feminists have tried to use law for social change. Topics include equal protection under the U.S. constitution, sex and race discrimination on the job, pay equity, regulations of pregnancy and abortion, and transgender rights.

WOMENSTD 291 / PSYCH 291. Introduction to the Psychology of Women and Gender
PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115 or 116. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on feminist theories and empirical findings on the psychology of women and gender. Specifically, the lived experiences of women, the social construction of gender, the gendered nature of social institutions, and the way that gender intersects with race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, social class, and other social categories.

WOMENSTD 293 / AMCULT 293. 20th Century Writing by Women of Color
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

In this class we explore the narrative practices of Latinas, African American, Native American, and Asian American women, paying special attention to the way in which their writing has given voice to their experiences as women of color. Over the course of the semester we consider the cultural, linguistic, and familial traditions that have informed their respective approaches to feminism, antiracism, and oppositional politics.

WOMENSTD 295 / AMCULT 295. Sexuality in Western Culture
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an introductory course on human sexuality and its role in Western culture. The focus is theories about sexuality, the history of sexual beliefs and practices, and the relationship of these beliefs and practices to other aspects of society such as the economy, the class system, gender roles, etc. Texts are drawn from literature, history, contemporary social theory, the Bible, and pornography.

WOMENSTD 300. Men's Health
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Health).

Introduces the health issues, cultural, and cross-cultural aspects of topics related to men's health. Topics include cardiovascular disease, cancer, AIDS, and other health issues. Issues of race, gender, social class, and ethnicity are central to this course.

WOMENSTD 301 / ASIAN 301. Writing Japanese Women
Knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A critical study of Japanese women's writing in the classical and modern periods, aimed at comparing their self-representations with the portrayal of them in the general male dominated culture of writing and the visual arts.

WOMENSTD 302 / ANTHRCUL 302 / HISTART 302. Sex and Gender in Japan
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Explore attribution and construction of gender in Japan historically and in the present time.

WOMENSTD 304 / AAS 304. Gender and Immigration: Identity, Race, and Place
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines crucial questions related to how mobility, border-crossing, dislocation, and displacement are gendered and are given cultural and political meanings in the era of globalization and transnationalism. We carefully examine the embedded meanings and histories of the terms, "diasporas," "transnationalism," and "globalization," and their usefulness in analyzing social constructions of gendered-identities, race, caste, and ethnicity, and reproduction, socialization, and health.

WOMENSTD 307 / ANTHRCUL 327 / RCSSCI 327. Critical Theory in Medicine and Healing
One course in ANTHRCUL or RCSSCI or WOMENSTD 240 or WOMENSTD with an SS designation. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the critical anthropological analysis of illness, health, healing, and medicine. We explore current and past medical anthropological approaches--political economic, phenomenological, symbolic, feminist, post-structural--in order to evaluate how well these frameworks convey the lived experience of bodies in their local worlds.

WOMENSTD 313. Special Topics in Gender and the Humanities
(3 - 4; 2 - 3 in the half-term). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Offers a perspective on gender in print and/or visual culture that focuses on how cultural artifacts are made and received. It acquaints students with how meaning is produced in works of literature, art history, drama, or film.

WOMENSTD 314 / ENGLISH 314. Gender and Sexuality Studies in Literature
(3 - 4; 2 - 3 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

A broad survey of a major literary or cultural theme, focusing on gender and/or sexuality as categories of analysis central to the understanding of human life and society.

WOMENSTD 315 / ENGLISH 315. Women and Literature
(3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course considers a wide variety of literature on women and literature often through the relation between the socio-historical existence of women and textual representation of women literary institutions and literary texts.

WOMENSTD 316 / HISTORY 316 / MEMS 316. Women and Gender in Medieval Europe: 500-1500
One course in Women's Studies or History. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The Middle Ages have a bad reputation with respect to women, but just how bad were they? This course explores the history of women and gender relations in medieval European society and culture from roughly 500 to 1500.

WOMENSTD 317 / HISTORY 317. Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1800
At least one course in WOMENSTD or HISTORY. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history of women and gender relations in European society and culture from the Protestant Reformation and the opening out to the New World through the French Revolution.

WOMENSTD 323 / AAS 323 / HISTORY 388. Black Feminist Thought and Practice
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the production and practice of black feminist theory in 20th century America. It examines the written work and the activism of African American women and looks at the ways their theory and practice historically intersect around questions of race, class, sexuality, nationality and gender. Using both primary and secondary sources, the course is also concerned with the various articulations of black feminism (e.g. womanism, critical race feminism, transnational black feminism, hip hop feminism, etc.).

WOMENSTD 324 / ANTHRCUL 325. Childbirth & Culture
Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Health).

This course focuses on the distinctive sociocultural configurations of childbirth practices and beliefs in several different societies. The cross-cultural study of childbirth provides a basis for understanding the cultural logic underlying these practices and beliefs and expands our knowledge of women's perspectives on social change and the medicalization of childbirth.

WOMENSTD 327 / HISTORY 327. The History of Sexuality
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Does sex have a history? This course proposed to respond to this provocative question by demonstrating how modern notions of sexuality have emerged historically. In that sense, sex is not part of nature, it is part of culture, or rather cultures and their histories. This lecture course will introduce students to an exciting new field of historical research. Our approach will be both topical and chronological; from ancient times to the present.

WOMENSTD 328 / AAS 328. Women, Agency and Sexual Safety
One course in WOMENSTD or AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course takes a transnational perspective on the purpose, development, and utilization of different kinds of reproductive technologies. Feminist critiques and analyses of the role of reproductive technologies in Africa, U.S., and global contexts are central to the course.

WOMENSTD 330. Feminist Thought
WOMENSTD 240 or AMCULT 240. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This interdisciplinary course explores multiple perspectives on gender, sexuality, feminism, and feminist theory. We will study movements and theoretical frameworks that are often defined as the "foundations" of feminism in the U.S. Students will examine women of color, post-colonial, and transnational feminisms.

WOMENSTD 331. Advanced Gender and the Law
WOMENSTD 270 or 308, with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an advanced treatment of the relationships between law and identity in the contemporary U.S., with a particular focus on gender, race, and sexuality. We study legal cases, statutes, and interdisciplinary scholarly writings on topics such as gender and international law, surveillance and regulation in the lives of poor women, health law, and marriage rights. Students work in small groups developing legal briefs and then complete a moot court exercise.

WOMENSTD 334 / HISTART 334. Women in the Visual Arts: Images and Image-Makers
One course in Women's Studies or History of Art. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender, Culture, and Representation).

The course studies women as both image-makers and role-players in the visual arts, examining their histories from the mid-18th to the beginning of the 20th century. It offers an introduction to how meanings about women and gender are produced through visual representation and how gender structures critical writing on art.

WOMENSTD 335. Gender and Globalization
WOMENSTD 240 or SOC 100. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender in a Global Context).

This course offers a critical and feminist examination of globalization as an ongoing and historical process, as discourse, and as representation. We will examine the impacts of the responses to the global reach of capitalism through the lens of gender relations, especially as it affects constructions of the subject 'women' cross culturally.

WOMENSTD 336 / AAS 336 / HISTORY 336. Black Women in the United States, Part I: From the American Revolution through the Women's Era
AAS 201 (CAAS 201). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history of African-American women from the American Revolution through the passage of the nineteenth amendment in 1920. Through the secondary work of historians and readings of primary sources, students will examine a variety of topics including work, the family, the construction of race and gender, politics, the law and sexuality. The course will also consider the various ways in which historians have theorized about black women's pasts and ask how those theories may help to inform our approaches to the telling of history.

WOMENSTD 337 / AAS 337 / HISTORY 337. Black Women in the U.S., Part II: Contemporary Perspective in the 20th and 21st Centuries
AAS 201 (CAAS 201). (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. AAS 336.

This course examines the history of black women in the United States during the 20th and 21st centuries. The course investigates black women's participation in, and influence on, post-World War II social and political movements as well as the impact of these struggles on black women's day-to-day lives, status, and politics. Centering black women's experiences as local organizers and political leaders, the course explores significant events, organizations, and political debates that helped to form and transform the civil rights, black power, and women's movements.

WOMENSTD 342. Special Topics in Gender and Health
WOMENSTD 220 or 240. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. (Gender and Health).

This course promotes an understanding of health as a construct shaped by history and ideas grounded in varying interpretations of the body and disease.

WOMENSTD 343. Special Topics in Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S.
WOMENSTD 240. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. (Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S.).

This course examines the effects of race and ethnicity on gender through the intersection of differences by considering interracial and interethnic relations as well as the mutual influence of social movements.

WOMENSTD 344. Special Topics in Gender, Culture, and Representation
WOMENSTD 240. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. (Gender, Culture, and Representation).

Offers a perspective on women and gender in music, print and visual culture that focuses on how cultural artifacts are made and received. It acquaints students with how meaning is produced in works of literature, art history, drama, music, film or other forms of mass media.

WOMENSTD 345. Special Topics in Gender in a Global Context
WOMENSTD 240 or AMCULT 240. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. (Gender in a Global Context).

Offers a comparative cross-cultural perspective on the construction and meaning of gender. The current forces of globalization and their complementary ideologies of imperialism and colonialism will serve as an analytic frame.

WOMENSTD 348 / SOC 345. Sociology of Sexuality
One introductory course in Sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to the sociology of sexuality in contemporary American society. Different theoretical perspectives for thinking about sexuality in the social sciences will be examined, issues of studying sexuality empirically will be reviewed, and how people construct a variety of social identities and relationships will be explored.

WOMENSTD 350. Nonprofit Management, Community Engagement, and Feminist Practice
WOMENSTD 240 or AMCULT 240 or WOMENSTD 220 or NURS 220. (4; 3 - 4 in the half-term). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. (Practice Course). F.

This course aims to address the gaps and misconceptions that often exist between feminism as an academic discourse and feminism in practice. Through classroom engagement and community involvement, students explore the intersection of academia and activism as it pertains to improving the lives of women and their communities. Students commit to volunteering in an area community-based organization.

WOMENSTD 351. Leading Feminism
One course in Women's Studies. WOMENSTD 350 is recommended, but not required. (4; 3 in the half-term). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. W.

This course builds on WS 350's examination of nonprofit management, community engagement, and feminist practice to a focused exploration of feminist practice and leadership.

WOMENSTD 354 / AAS 354 / HONORS 354 / RCHUMS 354. Race and Identity in Music
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the parameters of racial and ethnic identities in music; primarily but not exclusively in Western art music (commonly known as "classical music"). The focus is on understanding how racial and ethnic differences can be portrayed musically. Case studies are drawn from the late eighteenth century through the present with a strong emphasis on the nineteenth century and opera.

WOMENSTD 356 / AMCULT 331 / HISTORY 356. Health in America: Patterns, Experiences, and Inequalities
(3 - 4). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we will examine the broad profile of health in America, focusing on key issues in health disparities, illness experiences, and the role of medicine and technology. Students learn about health in relation to race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability, and other social relations and categories.

WOMENSTD 357. Feminist Practices in a Global Context
One course in Women's Studies. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

How do we understand feminist practices in various locations as well as the relationships between feminisms in the east and west, and the local and global? This course adopts a comparative approach to the investigation of particular historical processes of women's movements in three countries, the United States, India, and China. Focusing on the feminist activism in the three countries, this course attempts to ground our understanding of globalization in local history, and to present in a concrete way that feminisms have histories and meaning that extend far beyond the North American continent.

WOMENSTD 358. Selected Topics in Interdiscpilinary Women's Studies
(3 - 4). (ID). May be elected twice for credit.

This course considers a specific or contemporary interdisciplinary topic in women's and gender studies.

WOMENSTD 360 / AMCULT 342 / HISTORY 368. History of the Family in the U.S.
(4; 3 in the half-term). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

An interdisciplinary course providing perspective on the contemporary family by studying its historical development. The course includes consideration of changing gender roles; sexuality; childrearing; work patterns; race, ethnicity and class; the changing role of state in family relations.

WOMENSTD 363 / AMCULT 363 / ASIANPAM 363. Asian/Pacific Islander American Women
(3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the U.S.).

This is an upper-division, interdisciplinary course focusing on the experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islander American women in the United States from historical, anthropological, sociological, and psychological and literary perspectives.

WOMENSTD 365 / AAS 365. Global Perspectives on Gender, Health, and Reproduction
One course in either Women's Studies or AAS. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Examines constructions and meanings of gender, health, reproduction and social difference. By using various cross-cultural examples, we discuss how gender, racial, and class differences are enacted and manifested in the divisions of social spaces, and in bodily conduct, function, hygiene, and sickness.

WOMENSTD 366 / AMCULT 366 / HISTORY 353. Sex and Sexuality in U.S. Popular Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

We will explore how changing ideas about sex, sexuality, and gender appeared in certain types of twentieth-century popular culture. As a group, we will learn to interpret media, such as movies or television, as historical texts that provide insight into past notions about sex in the United States.

WOMENSTD 371 / AMCULT 371 / HISTORY 371. Women in American History Since 1870
(4). (ID). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels.

WOMENSTD 372 / HISTORY 372. Women and Gender in European History
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history of women and gender relations in European society and culture. Topics to be covered will vary, but might include: women and gender in politics, society, economy, culture, and family; the historical construction of femininity and masculinity; gender and power.

WOMENSTD 375 / HISTORY 375. A History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

In 1692, the notorious witchcraft trials took place in Salem, Massachusetts. While this case would become America's most famous witchcraft episode, it drew on a long history of witchcraft belief, accusation, and prosecution in Europe and the New World. In order to understand Salem and the phenomenon of witchcraft more generally, this course explores the long context of European witchcraft belief through the present day.

WOMENSTD 376 / JUDAIC 376. Women and the Bible
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender, Culture, and Representation).

There are many ways to read the Bible and ways of reading the Bible, and modes of interpretation have led to radically different constructions of women among various religious and ethnic groups and in diverse historical and geographical settings. Through names, languages, fiction, poetry, ritual objects, folklore, music, and other cultural expressions, this course considers the burgeoning feminist literature and cultural productions about women in monotheistic traditions, such as Eve, Sara, Hagar, Miriam, and Ruth.

WOMENSTD 377. Topics in Gender and Social Science
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course takes up a social science topic of a specific or contemporary nature.

WOMENSTD 380. Special Topics
WOMENSTD 240. (1 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 7 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will take up a single topic of a specific or contemporary nature.

WOMENSTD 381 / AAS 381 / ENGLISH 380. Intersections: Fictions and Feminisms of the African Diaspora
AAS 111 (CAAS 111). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Focusing on fiction written by women in the African Diaspora, this course explores how works of fiction can contribute to an understanding of feminisms, and how various feminist perspectives can contribute to an understanding of fictional texts.

WOMENSTD 384. Independent Research
Consent of department required. WOMENSTD 240 and one additional Women's Studies course. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected six times for credit.

This course provides students with the opportunity of either conducting their own research under the supervision of a Women's Studies faculty member or working with a Women's Studies professor on a pre-existing research project. More specifically, students may develop a critical analysis of a set of readings or follow a research plan that includes collecting, analyzing, and interpreting original data.

WOMENSTD 385. Directed Reading
Consent of instructor required. WOMENSTD 240, and one additional Women's Studies course. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. (Reading/Research Course).

This course offers students the opportunity to pursue an independent, interdisciplinary reading project on any subject related to women and gender. A final written report is required, but the format (e.g. a research paper, with an annotated bibliography, etc.) is up to the discretion of the faculty supervisor. Students are responsible for finding a Women's Studies faculty member who will sponsor their independent reading course.

WOMENSTD 389. Junior Honors Seminar
Consent of department required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to help students develop the research and analytical skills necessary to complete an interdisciplinary Honors thesis. Through reading assignments and guest speakers, we explore research methods, argument formulation, and standards of evidence in different disciplines. The bulk of the work, however, focuses on each student formulating her/his thesis topic, conducting a literature review, identifying sources, and writing a research proposal outlining the problem or hypothesis and research design for the thesis. In individual meetings, the instructor assists each student in identifying an appropriate faculty member to advise her/his thesis research and writing during their senior year. Students also read and comment on each others' research proposals.

WOMENSTD 390 / AAS 390. Homophobia in the Black World
One course in WOMENSTD or AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the presentation and meaning of homosexuality and homophobia in communities of color in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Africa. The cultural presentation and consequences of homophobia and discrimination vary greatly depending on the location. Therefore, an emphasis is placed on understanding different social constructions of homosexuality and how these views are complicated by geographical region.

WOMENSTD 394 / PSYCH 394. Sex, Sexuality, and Public Policy
PSYCH 111 or any WOMENSTD course. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines a series of U.S. policies that aim to shape the sexual lives of young people and adults. We examine policies concerning how we learn about sex, engage in sex, and form families. Topics include HPV vaccines, sex education, school-based bullying, same-sex marriage, contraception, and abortion.

WOMENSTD 400. Women's Reproductive Health
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Health). W.

WOMENSTD 400 will explore the current biomedical understanding of major conditions affecting the reproductive health of women, e.g. pregnancy, STDs and menopause. Course discussion will develop within a feminist and socio-political context.

WOMENSTD 405. Pharma, Pills, and Policy
WOMENSTD 220 or NURS 220. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

There are documented gender, sex, age and ethnic differences in the way controlled medications are prescribed and misused. Using a feminist lens to guide a critical analysis of extant research, this course explores the ways in which controlled medications are used, misused, abused and diverted in the United States by different populations (women, LGBT, men in rural communities, adolescents, etc.).

WOMENSTD 410. Reproductive Justice
WOMENSTD 220, 240, 270 or 400, or AMCULT 240 or NURS 220 or SOC 270. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course surveys legal and ethical issues surrounding decisions about pregnancy and childbirth, with a focus on reproductive injustice. We will look at current issues in the news, U.S. case and statutory law on the rights of women, childbearing issues, maternal-fetal questions, as well as laws and practices restricting access to services.

WOMENSTD 411 / AMCULT 411. Rednecks, Queers, and Country Music
One course in Women's Studies or American Culture. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Queer identity is associated with urban, bourgeois, coastal lifestyles. Country music is linked to heterosexual white, rural, working-class, Southern, and Midwestern cultures and often to "redneck" bigotry. How has music that many people perceive as homophobic and racist become a medium for multicultural queer social and sexual exchange?

WOMENSTD 414 / ENGLISH 415. Studies in Women and Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An intensive study of women and literature. A particular section might focus on a group of women writers defined by a period, a literary form, or a particular tradition; on representations of women in literature in some period or form, or a specific image of women present in a range of literature; or some combination of these topics.

WOMENSTD 421 / SM 421. Gender and Sport
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an introduction to issues and debates surrounding gender and sport in general, and women in sport in particular. It will utilize a critical perspective to examine sport as a significant social institution and to explore its relationship to the cultural construction and interpretation of gender.

WOMENSTD 422 / POLSCI 401. Feminist Political Theory
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

WOMENSTD 425 / AMCULT 425. Feminist Practice of Oral History
One course in WOMENSTD or AMCULT. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. We examine various theories and methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We also explore issues such as "insider-outsider" perspectives, relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, our role as "narrator," legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories.

WOMENSTD 428 / ANTHRCUL 428 / RCSSCI 428. Sex Panics in the US and UK since 1890
One course in WOMENSTD or ANTHRCUL or RCSSCI, SOC, or HISTORY. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the paradigm of "sex panics" and examines several case studies, including anti-prostitution movements in Britain and the US, progressive era conflicts over age of consent, female sexual precocity and juvenile justice in the US, the eruption of concern over sexual psychopaths in the 1930s-1950s, and anti-homosexual crusades in the 1940s and 1950s. The lingering legacies of these conflicts and their imprint on more contemporary conflicts will be explored.

WOMENSTD 431. Advanced Topics in LGBTQ Studies
WOMENSTD 245 or 295. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This advanced special topics seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to sexuality in light of a religious belief, legal code, medical construction, social movement, or cultural representation.

WOMENSTD 432. Advanced Topics in Gender and Health
WOMENSTD 220 or NURS 220. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This advanced special topics course promotes an understanding of health as a construct shaped by history and ideas grounded in varying interpretations of the body and disease.

WOMENSTD 434. Advanced Topics in Gender, Culture, and Representation
WOMENSTD 240. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This advanced special topics course explores ways in which meanings about women and gender are produced through cultural images, artifacts, and/or performances.

WOMENSTD 435. Advanced Topics in Gender in a Global Context
WOMENSTD 240. (3 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This advanced special topics in Gender in a Global Context course offers a comparative cross-cultural perspective on the construction and meaning of gender, race, class, and sexuality. It examines current forces of globalization and empire, the histories of imperialism and colonialism, and postcolonial resistance and theory.

WOMENSTD 438. Gender, Health, and Well-being in Africa
One course in Women's Studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on how gender is intertwined with health and well-being in sub-Saharan Africa. It emphasizes the importance of situating health issues within broader social contexts, with special attention to women's sexual health. It engages a range of materials, including ethnographies, journalistic accounts, novels, films, and public health interventions.

WOMENSTD 440. Women's Studies Senior Capstone
Women's Studies majors with senior status. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. Interdisciplinary seminar required for all senior majors.

This seminar is designed to help graduating WS seniors look back, synthesizing what they have learned in WS, and look ahead, envisioning how they might apply their knowledge and experience in postgraduate lives and careers. The topic will be explored through readings, discussions, writing assignments, and a series of speakers.

WOMENSTD 441. Senior Honors Seminar I
Consent of department required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

In this seminar, students consider and discuss issues related to conducting independent research for their honors theses. Seminar topics may include all aspects of conducting independent research such as writing literature reviews, applying for research funds, seeking IRB approval, the data collection process, the presentation of research findings, and attending conferences.

WOMENSTD 442. Senior Honors Seminar II
Consent of department required. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

In this seminar, students consider and discuss issues related to conducting independent research for their honors theses. Topics may include all aspects of conducting independent research, such as the presentation of research findings and attending conferences. Additionally, students prepare and practice their oral presentations for the annual Honors Colloquium held in April.

WOMENSTD 443 / AAS 443. Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health
AAS 201, WOMENSTD 240 or 220, AMCULT 240, NURS 220. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender and Health).

This course will explore the intersections of health, gender, and race by focusing on the epidemic of HIV and the epidemic of violence in the African American community. Students will explore the theory and practice surrounding an intervention module on HIV prevention and violence.

WOMENSTD 446 / ANTHRCUL 446. Sex and the City: Urban Geography and Sexual Locations
At least one course in Anthropology, History, Women's Studies, Sociology, LGBTQ Studies, or Urban Studies/Urban Planning. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines contemporary sexual diversity in the context of urban geography, urban studies, and the political economies of sexuality and space. It addresses issues of the spatial locations of sexual populations and situates the formation and disappearance of sexual neighborhoods and territories in terms of the larger dynamics of urban life. Topics include relationships between urban size to sexual specialization, impact of redevelopment and gentrification on the texture of urban neighborhoods, and specific studies of red light districts, prostitution, and homosexuality.

WOMENSTD 447 / SOC 447. Sociology of Gender
One introductory course in sociology or women's studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course asks: Why is there gender inequality? and what are women's experiences of that inequality? The course will examine politics, the state, work, family, body, and sexuality, all areas of social life that have been theorized as the locus of women's oppression.

WOMENSTD 451 / SOC 451. Women and Work
WOMENSTD 240 (or AMCULT 240) or SOC 100, and one other course in SOC or WOMENSTD. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gendered Lives).

This course will draw on empirical research and theory to analyze a wide range of issues regarding gender and work.

WOMENSTD 452 / PSYCH 430. Sexuality and Science
Any WOMENSTD course or PSYCH 111. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This interdisciplinary course focuses on sexuality and science from two perspectives. We discuss current biological and neuroscientific research about sexuality, as well as feminist scholarship on these topics and critical responses to this research. Topics cover the intersections between biology, sexuality, and feminist/critical scholarship about this research.

WOMENSTD 461 / SAC 461. Explorations in Feminist Film Theory
WOMENSTD 240 or AMCULT 240; and junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender, Culture, and Representation).

This course offers an in-depth exploration of feminist theories that address film in relation to gender. Discussion focuses on contemporary feminist scholarship that draws upon a variety of viewpoints, including psychoanalysis, cultural theory, postmodernism, historical research and ideological theory.

WOMENSTD 465 / PSYCH 488 / SOC 465. Sociological Analysis of Deviance
One introductory course in sociology. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a sociological examination of the social construction of deviant categories and their consequences, using analysis of conventional values and modes of social control. Students are expected to develop a critical perspective and facilitate reflective thought about deviance.

WOMENSTD 471 / AAPTIS 495 / HISTORY 429 / RELIGION 496. Gender and Sexuality in Pre-Modern Islam
Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. (Gender in a Global Context).

An introduction to Muslim understanding of gender and gender relations, first through a study of those sacred texts (Qur'an and Hadith) that came to define the ideal woman and man, as well as their roles and relationships. Then, gender participation in the political and cultural life of the Safavi, Ottoman and Mughal Courts shall be explored to view the interplay between theory and practice.

WOMENSTD 477. Field Study in Feminist Practice
Consent of instructor required. One course in WOMENSTD. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 7 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

In this course students put their evolving understanding of feminist knowledge into practice. As a form of service learning, they are engaged in providing services to a community or conducting research in the field.

WOMENSTD 483. Special Topics
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 7 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. A maximum of 7 credits of WOMENSTD 482 and 483 may be counted toward graduation.

This course considers a topic of a specific or contemporary nature.

WOMENSTD 486 / PHIL 486. Topics in Feminist Philosophy
Two courses in either Philosophy or Women's Studies or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender, Culture, and Representation).

WOMENSTD 487 / ACABS 487. Gender and Society in Ancient Egypt
Some familiarity with Egypt is helpful. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender in a Global Context).

Using ancient texts in translation, secondary readings and artifacts in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, students in this course will examine the definitions of gender, gender roles and relations and the impact of status, religion, sexuality and ethnicity on ancient Egyptian understandings of gender.

WOMENSTD 490. Honors Thesis
Consent of instructor required. Senior Honors Women's Studies concentrators. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. (Reading/Research Course). Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of WOMENSTD 491, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F, W, Sp, Su.

Women's Studies 490 and 491 should be elected during the senior year by students writing Honors thesis.

WOMENSTD 491. Honors Thesis
Consent of instructor required. Senior Honors Women's Studies majors. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. (Reading/Research Course). F, W, Sp, Su.

Women's Studies 490 and 491 should be elected during the senior year by students writing Honors thesis.

WOMENSTD 492 / REEES 490 / SOC 490. Women and Islam: A Sociological Perspective
(3). May not be repeated for credit. (Gender in a Global Context).

WOMENSTD 494 / PSYCH 494. Adolescent Sexuality
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course addresses a wide range of issues that affect young people and their sexual development. We look at early lessons regarding sexuality as the basis for individuals' attitudes regarding sex and potential sexual/relational partners throughout their lifetime.

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