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Courses in LSA Anthropology
Anthropology, Archaeological (ANTHRARC)
ANTHRARC 407. Archaeology of South Asia
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Provides an overview of South Asian Archaeology from the earliest evidence for hominids at c. 1.5 million years ago through the emergence of early historic states and empires. Discusses major cultural transitions and important sites in several regions of South Asia, in the context of the history of archaeological research in this area.

ANTHRARC 480. Practica in Archaeological Research Techniques
Juniors and above or permission of instructor. (1 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course provides students with theoretical background and hands-on experience in the documentation and analysis of a range of archaeological remains. The course is subdivided into units or sections, focusing on some combination of the following: the analysis of ceramics, lithics, fauna, botanical remains, soils, archaeological photography, mapping, and drafting.

ANTHRARC 482. Topics in Anthropological Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. Junior standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course will cover in-depth topics in anthropological archaeology. The topics covered will vary from term to term. Students should consult the time schedule for the focus in any given term.

ANTHRARC 483. Near Eastern Prehistory
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Area survey course on the archaeology of Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Syria, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran, from the Lower Paleolithic to the beginnings of Sumerian civilization.

ANTHRARC 487. UM Training Program in Archaeology
(6). May not be repeated for credit. May not be used toward the Anthropology academic minors.

Provides undergraduate and graduate students with training in excavation, survey, and artifact analysis, while participating in ongoing research. The sites excavated are all Native American in origin. All lectures and mush of the training related to artifact and site interpretation stress Native American life ways, symbolic and religious values, etc.

ANTHRARC 490. Prehistory of North America
Sophomore & above/permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The growth of prehistoric American Indian cultures from the Arctic to the Rio Grande.

ANTHRARC 494. Introduction to Analytical Methods in Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. One course in statistics and junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the major methods of statistical analysis used in archaeological research.

ANTHRARC 581. Archaeology I
Graduate standing only. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Roughly half of this course is devoted to developing models of the operation and evolution of hunter-gatherer cultural systems and to discussing the ways in which these systems may be studied from the archaeological record. The second half of the course consists of a review of the archaeological evidence from the evolution of these cultural systems from their earliest appearance until the beginnings of sedentary agricultural communities. Emphasis is given to Africa with brief attention paid to Asia and the New World.

ANTHRARC 582. Archaeology II
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of world prehistoric cultural development from village life to urban civilization. It introduces theories of the origin of agriculture, the development of ranked and stratified societies, and the origin of states and empires. Exemplary data from Mesoamerica, the Central Andes and Mesopotamia are used to test these theories.

ANTHRARC 593. Archaeological Systematics
Consent of instructor required. Senior concentrators and graduates. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed principally for graduate students in anthropology. It examines the epistemological basis for archaeology, major theoretical frameworks for reconstructing past human organization and studying its change, and methodological approaches appropriate for such investigations. The course is designed as a seminar, with strong emphasis on active student participation.

ANTHRARC 680. Old World Regional Archaeology
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A detailed treatment of specific problems and areas in the Old World.

ANTHRARC 683. Topics in Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing only. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will cover recent advances in archaeological research. Each semester that it is offered a different topic will be discussed by one of the department's archaeologists. Potential subjects are prehistoric demography, origins of agriculture, zoo archaeology, social formation, etc.

ANTHRARC 687. New World Regional Archaeology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

A detailed treatment of specific problems in areas in the New World.

ANTHRARC 691. Settlement Systems in Pre-Industrial Societies
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Analysis of ethnographic, historic and ethno-historic sources in order to determine causal factors in the configuration of human settlement at various developmental stages prior to the advent of modern industrial society. The major objective is to develop models for the interpretation of prehistoric settlement systems.

ANTHRARC 694. Analytic Methods in Archaeological Research
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Seminar on problems in handling and interpreting archaeological data. The course covers such topics as attributable analysis of artifacts, problems in the handling of stylistic data, use of settlement pattern studies, structure within cemeteries and the use of statistics in archaeological research. Computer methods in archaeology will be discussed. Emphasis on one or more of these topics varies from year to year.

ANTHRARC 958. Anthropological Research
Graduate standing and 18 hours of Anthropology; permission of instructor. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

ANTHRARC 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Graduate standing and 18 hours of Anthropology; permission of instructor. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

ANTHRARC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ANTHRARC 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Anthropology, Biological (ANTHRBIO)
ANTHRBIO 450. Molecular Anthropology
ANTHRBIO 161 and 363. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an advanced introduction to Molecular Anthropology. It introduces ways in which molecular data is analyzed and then used to answer questions concerning human evolutionary history. Students will learn principles of molecular evolution and how to apply these principles to human and non-human primate DNA and protein sequence data.

ANTHRBIO 465. Primate Functional Anatomy
ANTHRBIO 351, 365, 368 or 477. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course introduces students to the evolutionary history of the primate radiation, particularly the evolution of monkeys, apes and humans, through an analysis of primate anatomy. The focus will be on the postcranial musculoskeletal anatomy of extant and fossil primates and reconstruction of the behavior of extinct forms.

ANTHRBIO 467. Human Behavioral Ecology
A strong background in the natural sciences is assumed, including any two of the following courses: ANTHRBIO 161, 368; BIOLOGY 162, 171, 172; MCDB 404; EEB 494. (4; 3 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers the anthropological significance of recent advances in natural selection theory. Students will read the primary scientific literature to learn how anthropologists test evolutionary hypotheses about human behavior.

ANTHRBIO 469. Topics in Biological Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. (2 - 4; 2 - 3 in the half-term). (BS). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

ANTHRBIO 472. Human Nature
Consent of instructor required. ANTHRBIO 467. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an advanced seminar in evolutionary psychology. Topics include: sexual selection, mating systems theory, parental investment, reciprocity, morality, and religion.

ANTHRBIO 474. Hominid Origins
ANTHRBIO 365. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is about the origin of the human species and the adaptations and life history of the earliest human ancestors before Homo. It examines the ancestry of the hominids, the various theories of their origin, and aspects of australopithecine evolution such as their history, locomotion, behavior, adaptations, and taxonomy.

ANTHRBIO 475. Evolution of Genus Homo
ANTHRBIO 351 or 365. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Evolution of the genus Homo from H erectus to modern human populations. Topics include origin and dispersal of Homo erectus, appearance and evolution of early H. sapiens, Neanderthal, and modern humans.

ANTHRBIO 478. Primate Behavioral Ecology
Consent of instructor required. ANTHRBIO 368. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This advanced undergraduate/graduate course examines the ecology and behavior of non-human primates. Using mainly primary research articles, we explore several themes in primate behavioral ecology including reproductive strategies, sexual selection, behavioral endocrinology, cooperation and conflict, cultural transmission, and primate cognition.

ANTHRBIO 560. Human Reproductive Ecology
ANTHRBIO 467 and a strong background in biology as well as evolutionary theory; Undergraduates with permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is a graduate-level seminar on human reproductive ecology. We will read technical, scientific articles that assume a strong background in biology as well as evolutionary theory. Sample questions include: Why did menstruation and menopause evolve? Does menstrual synchrony exist? Does female sexuality change at the time of ovulation? What adaptations influence female fertility? What progress has been made in understanding male reproductive strategies? We will also explore diverse cultural practices that constrain female sexuality.

ANTHRBIO 561. Issues in Biological Anthropology
Graduate standing or consent of instructor. (2 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This seminar covers topical issues in biological anthropology.

ANTHRBIO 563. Human Evolutionary Genetics
(2 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course explores the ways in which molecular data and population genetics are used to answer questions concerning human evolutionary history. Topics will include the reconstruction of human migrations, evidence for natural selection in the human genome, and linking genotype to phenotype.

ANTHRBIO 569 / PSYCH 539. Grant-Writing for Life Sciences
(2 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

This is a graduate seminar that teaches scientific writing for the life sciences. We will focus on grant writing and the anatomy of a grant proposal (mainly NSF and NIH). Additionally, students will learn about the different components of grant proposals and how the review process works.

ANTHRBIO 570. Biological Anthropology: An Overview
Graduate standing in Anthropology. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduces biological anthropology for anthropology graduate students, relating its theoretical basis in Darwinian evolution, and the topics biological anthropologists study, to ethnology, archaeology, and linguistics. Focus is on the anatomical, behavioral, and genetic aspects of human evolution and variation. The course also acquaints students with faculty research in biological anthropology.

ANTHRBIO 661. Topics in Biological Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (2 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

ANTHRBIO 664. Problems in Nutrition, Growth and Aging
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRBIO 665. Topics in Human Evolution
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (2). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

ANTHRBIO 668 / PSYCH 630. Topics in Primatology
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (2 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRBIO 961. Research Practicum in Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. 18 hours or Graduate standing. (2 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRBIO 962. Anthropological Research
Consent of instructor required. 18 hours or Graduate standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRBIO 963. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Consent of instructor required. 18 hours or Graduate standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRBIO 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

ANTHRBIO 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate and permission of instructor. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Anthropology, Cultural (ANTHRCUL)
ANTHRCUL 402. Chinese Society and Cultures
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Description and interpretation of the agrarian aspect of Chinese civilization, treating such topics as traditional family and village organization, class structure and modern changes.

ANTHRCUL 408 / AAS 409. Maternal/Child Health and Environmental Pollution in Africa
Junior or above. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on the effects of the environment and environmental pollution on the health of women and children in several sub-Saharan African countries. Selected readings in medical anthropological, public health, and environmental pollution as well as films examining connections between health, environmental factors, culture, and development are examined.

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa
Junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 411 / AAS 422. African Cultures
AAS 200 (CAAS 200); and junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. The course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa.

ANTHRCUL 414 / AAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
Junior standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean with emphasis on Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Guyana. Analysis of class, race relations, cultural pluralism, ethnicity, population movements, and economic development.

ANTHRCUL 416 / HBEHED 516. Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 423. Anthropology in Melanesia: History and Contemporary Developments
ANTHRCUL 101 or 222. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Anthropological research in Melanesia has played a significant role in the history of the discipline, from Malinowski?s early work in the Trobriand Islands to the scholarship of the 1970s and 1980s. The first half of the course considers anthropological contributions to long-standing debates about magic, sorcery, ritual, exchange, social relations, and gender. The second half examines the more recent generation of ethnographies that addresses the state, modernization, and processes of globalization, including Melanesian engagements with mining companies, commodities, Christianity, and NGOs.

ANTHRCUL 437. The Anthropology of Death, Dying and the Afterlife
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the ways that death, dying and the afterlife are practiced and imagined in different places and times, drawing on the anthropology of religion, political anthropology, and medical anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development
Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 440. Cultural Adaptation
Junior standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to ecological anthropology and the evolutionary adaptation of cultures, origins of cultural diversity, and cultural adaptation and maladaptation.

ANTHRCUL 445. Cultural Anthropology Mini-Course
Junior Standing and above, or permission of instructor. (1 - 2). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course covers special topics in cultural anthropology. Topics covered vary by term. Students should consult the schedule of classes for the focus in any given term. This course is offered as a seven-week mini-course.

ANTHRCUL 446 / WOMENSTD 446. Sex and the City: Urban Geography and Sexual Locations
At least one course in Anthropology, History, Women's Studies, Sociology, LGBTQ Studies, or Urban Studies/Urban Planning. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines contemporary sexual diversity in the context of urban geography, urban studies, and the political economies of sexuality and space. It addresses issues of the spatial locations of sexual populations and situates the formation and disappearance of sexual neighborhoods and territories in terms of the larger dynamics of urban life. Topics include relationships between urban size to sexual specialization, impact of redevelopment and gentrification on the texture of urban neighborhoods, and specific studies of red light districts, prostitution, and homosexuality.

ANTHRCUL 450. Anthropologies of Insurgency: Bandits, Rebels and Freedom Fighters
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the interlinked categories of rebel, bandit, and freedom fighter to understand insurgency from an anthropological viewpoint. Privileging sociological and micropolitical analysis, the course approaches specific instances of illegal use of force in their sociocultural and historic settings, and builds toward a consideration of insurgency from "the actors' points of view".

ANTHRCUL 451 / AAS 459. African-American Religion
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 453 / AAS 454. African-American Culture
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. Junior and above. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course covers various in-depth topics in sociocultural or linguistic. Topics covered vary from term to term. Consult the Time Schedule for the focus in any given term.

ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461 / LING 461 / NATIVEAM 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages.

ANTHRCUL 473 / LING 473. Ethnopoetics: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Verbal Art
Two courses in anthropology, linguistics, or literature or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores relationships between language and social groupings such as "tribe", "ethnic group' and "nation". Are such groupings based on shared language? Through cross-cultural case studies and historical materials, we consider how linguistic similarities and differences unite or divide people, in practice and in ideology.

ANTHRCUL 474. Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores relationships between language and social groupings such as "tribe", "ethnic group' and "nation". Are such groupings based on shared language? Through cross-cultural case studies and historical materials, we consider how linguistic similarities and differences unite or divide people, in practice and in ideology.

ANTHRCUL 501 / ASIAN 501 / CCS 501 / HISTORY 549 / POLSCI 501 / SOC 527. Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Permission of instructor. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

The course will focus on current issues in social scientific studies of historical and contemporary China. Each class will discuss a different disciplinary approach to a common subject, emphasizing the different research designs and data available and comparing the results with similar studies in other countries.

ANTHRCUL 502 / ASIAN 502 / CCS 502 / HISTART 504 / HISTORY 548 / POLSCI 502. Humanistic Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine the present state of research in selected areas of scholarly inquiry in Chinese studies - language, literature, history, religion material culture, and art history - as we interrogate such seemingly commonsense notions as "civilization," "culture," "tradition," "modernity," and above all, "Chineseness." Our goals are to develop good reading skills, stimulate critical thinking, and inspire imaginative approaches to humanistic problems.

ANTHRCUL 505. Anthropology of South Asia
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Close reading of significant anthropological works on South Asia with emphasis on their central themes: caste, village, kinship, ritual, exchange, religion, region, tradition, modernity/modernization, civilization, colonialism, the state, publics. We will also situate these works within developments in the humanities and the social sciences, and politics at a variety of scales.

ANTHRCUL 519 / GERMAN 517 / LING 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 526. Traditions of Ethnology I
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing only. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course presents the major schools and traditions in ethnology from its nineteenth-century precursors to about 1950. It is the first part of a yearlong sequence.

ANTHRCUL 527. Traditions of Ethnology II
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 536. Politics/Aesthetics
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the complex relations between expressive culture and the exercise of power. It includes full-length monographs on the performance of secularism in contemporary Turkey, urban experience in Kinshasa, and the 'theater state' in Ball. We examine the proposition that the politics of artistic creation and the aesthetic elements of political rhetoric and practice are interrelated as two moments in a dialectic.

ANTHRCUL 537. The Modern Corporation
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Exploration of the modern corporation as a social form and, in particular, as an institution of governance. Topics include: the early history of the corporate form, limited liability and entity shielding, incorporation and corporate personhood, property, work and management, markets, military force, finance, and knowledge. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines including history, law, economics, sociology, and anthropology. We will consider a diverse range of corporation: monastic orders, colonial trading corporations, and contemporary manufacturing, service, financial and non-profit corporations.

ANTHRCUL 538. Materiality: Theoretical Approaches to Sociocultural Anthropology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course covers theoretical approaches to material culture and materiality in socio-cultural anthropology that have emerged over the last two decades.

ANTHRCUL 539. Consumption
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to provide an overview of some of the most salient issues for understanding consumption in anthropological research today. Once a marginalized topic in anthropology, the study of "consumption" per se makes little sense in a world where it is difficult to conceive of an anthropological topic that can avoid engagement with commodified material cultures and related economies, networks, cultural meanings and social organizations. The study of "consumption" today carries on under various rubrics, from studies of material culture and commercial media, to commodity chain analyses and biopolitics. The readings to be discussed will provide both theoretical grounding in basic issues and questions, as well as forays into more recent developments. Topics to be covered include: morality, commodity, gift, body, shopping, provisioning, sacrifice, class, brand, image, media, value, materiality.

ANTHRCUL 546 / MUSICOL 547. Introduction to Ethnomusicology
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 548. Theory and Practice in Medical Anthropology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar examines the theoretical foundations of medical anthropology as well as particular studies which represent subfield interests in cultural concepts of health and illness; local and global aspects of reproduction health; the social construction of knowledge and politics of science; ethno-medicine and healing; and perceptions of environment and health.

ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography
400-level coursework in Anthropology, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices.

ANTHRCUL 554. Media Anthropology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This graduate seminar poses anthropological critique of the ways in which media technologies (photography, radio, television, film, audiocassettes, newspapers, the Internet, etc.) are used to represent and construct cultures. We will question how and why mass media produce formulaic identities, and explore how people employ media technologies to interrogate, subvert, and redefine existing conventions.

ANTHRCUL 558. Current Issues in Sociocultural Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. 400-level coursework in Anthropology; and graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

ANTHRCUL 572 / LING 542. Introduction to Sociolinguistics
LING 411 or graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

The class will discuss such relationships between language and society and how they might be studied objectively. We will focus on issues directly affecting a person's everyday life, such as attitudes towards different languages and dialects and historical and social reasons for these attitudes; questions about why different groups of speakers in the same society use language differently and how this difference is evaluated; use of minority languages whose survival seems to be threatened and governments' language policies.

ANTHRCUL 578. Monographs in the Ethnography of Speaking
Consent of instructor required. ANTHRCUL 576. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint student with major works in the ethnography of speaking, ranging from studies that approach language ethnographically to those that approach ethnography through language. It considers ways in which ethnographers have used linguistic evidence to draw inferences about social relations and cultural patterns, and consider the methodological insights and problems raised by these studies.

ANTHRCUL 579. Semiotic Anthropology
400-level course work in Anthropology and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 625. Anthropological Approaches to Property and Property Rights
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Property is a topic of great current importance. This course introduces anthropological conceptions of property and covers several timely issues, such as privatization, intellectual and cultural property, the commons, and property in body parts.

ANTHRCUL 628. Bio-Art International: Biotechnology, Genetics, and Contemporary Art
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of art forms produced from using biotechnology and/or genetic engineering to create, manipulate, and/or transform living things. These new art forms cross and confuse the boundaries between "the artificial" and "the natural," and provoke complex ethical questions.

ANTHRCUL 629. Method and Interpretation in Sociocultural Anthropology
Graduate standing only. (1 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is concerned with anthropological field research from research design and grant proposal writing to data collection and analysis.

ANTHRCUL 632. Comparative Analysis of Kinship
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will cover the structure of various kinship systems, the character of kinship ideology and mechanisms of kin behavior, principles of kin groupings and recent approaches in kinship studies.

ANTHRCUL 647 / WOMENSTD 647. Sexological Theory
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine theories of sexuality from early sexology through the social histories and new paradigms of sexuality in the 1970s. We will consider key late 19th century figures including Krafft-Ebing, Ellis, Hirschfeld, and Freud. 20th century readings will include Kinsey, Gagnon, Simon, McIntosh, Reiss, Weeks, Vance, and Foucault.

ANTHRCUL 648 / HISTORY 648. Seminar in Anthropology and History I
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is organized around the intensive discussion of classic and path-breaking monographs and articles that address questions of theory and method in the humanities and social sciences, as well as the development of proposals for summer research for a research seminar paper.

ANTHRCUL 652. Ethnographic Writing
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers the history, politics, and possibilities of ethnographic writing. We will discuss a variety of ethnographic genres, including literary journalism, experimental ethnography, feminist ethnography, travel accounts, the memoir, poetry of witness, investigative reporting, documentary image-texts, the ethnographic novel, and autobiographical criticism. Our focus will be on the dilemmas of writing narratives of place and voice. We will analyze a range of textural strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places. In addition to familiarizing ourselves with these literary genres and textual strategies. I want to provide a workshop environment for members of the class to strengthen their own writing and embark on major ethnographic projects of their own.

ANTHRCUL 658. Special Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2 - 3). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

ANTHRCUL 673. Language Ideologies
Graduate standing; previous background in Linguistic, Anthropology (such as ANTHRCUL 576 and preferably 577) or in Sociolinguistics; or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

"Language Ideologies" are conceptualizations about the language, speakers, and discourse practices people encounter in their social world. The study of language ideologies draws together questions about language, culture, social positioning, and politics. This course explores such questions theoretically and through a wide range of ethnographic, historical, and linguistic case materials.

ANTHRCUL 675. Topics in Anthropological Linguistics
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 679. Sentiment/Affect/Structures of Feeling
ANTHRCUL 526 or 576 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Anxiety and angst. Despair, disdain, boredom. Schadenfreude and sympathy. Love and lust. Conflicts over how to define, spark, or manage "emotions," "feelings," or "affects" have fueled projects from "colonialism" and "liberalism," to "market capitalism" and "modern socialism," to "feminism" and "peace movements." And yet we frequently confront discourses claiming the matters of sentiment are folded away into the recesses of individual psyches or biological organisms, as "unspeakable" island of primal realities--albeit realities deemed smaller and lesser than those assigned to, say, "geopolitical scales." In this seminar, we will contrast several approaches to thinking about sentiment that have been relevant within anthropology (semiotic, interdiscursive, linguistic, psychological, biological, social, reflexive, political economic...), and work to recognize both the promises and limiting presuppositions of each.

ANTHRCUL 748 / HISTORY 748. Seminar in Anthropology and History II
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is primarily a writing seminar that satisfies the 700-level History seminar requirement. It offers Anthropology and History Program students the opportunity to write the extended paper conceived in the winter term and drawing on the preliminary research conducted during the intervening summer break.

ANTHRCUL 759. Sociocultural Workshop
Graduate standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (1). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

ANTHRCUL 777. Linguistic Anthropology Laboratory
Graduate standing in Anthropology or a related discipline. (1 - 3). May be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 797. Ethnography Lab
(1 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

For anthropology graduate students returning from fieldwork. Sociocultural anthropology is based on fieldwork, which is usually conducted independently. The ethnography lab is a context in which graduate students who have completed fieldwork and are engaged in writing their dissertations can meet in a structured fashion to discuss their research and writing. The instructor for the course will work with these graduate students by providing relevant readings and exercises. Students will also read and critique each other's work. The ethnography lab will also invite guests to present their work, with a special emphasis on the practical aspects of moving between ethnographic observation and theory through analysis. The ethnology lab will also provide a forum for these graduate students to present conference papers and practice job talks; the major advisors of these students will also be invited to participate in these events. Students will also receive guidance and direction on the process of turning conference papers and dissertation chapters into published articles.

ANTHRCUL 830 / HISTORY 830. Anthropology and History Workshop/Reading Group
(1). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

ANTHRCUL 836 / SW 871. Anthropology and Social Work Seminar
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar is a foundation course for students in the joint Anthropology/Social Work Program. The readings bring together social theory and ethnographic accounts of contemporary social issues at the intersection of the disciplines. Topics may include medicine and health, human and civil rights, urban neighborhoods, immigration, race, ethnicity and gender.

ANTHRCUL 957. Research Practicum in Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (2 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 958. Anthropological Research
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 959. Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

ANTHRCUL 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

ANTHRCUL 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

ANTHRCUL 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

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