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Courses in LSA Classical Studies
Classical Archaeology (CLARCH)
CLARCH 420 / HISTART 430. Greece before History: The Art and Archaeology of Greek Lands ca 3500 to 700 BCE
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the origins, character and collapse of complex societies of the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean. Sources of evidence include architecture, artifacts, mortuary practices and the distribution of sites within the wider landscape. We also explore recent work on documentary sources, including the linear B (Mycenean) tablets.

CLARCH 424 / HISTART 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 425. Hellenistic and Republican Roman Architecture
CLARCH 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course covers the architecture of first millennium BCE Italy. It provides a sense of how later Roman architecture came into being by retracing its origins from the Iron Age to the Etruscan period. Hellenistic Italian architecture is analyzed within its proper Mediterranean context.

CLARCH 426. Roman Imperial Architecture
CLARCH 222/HISTART 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course surveys the architecture of the Roman empire from the reign of Augustus at the turn of the millennium to the reign of Justinian in the mid-sixth century A.D. Special attention is paid to the urban development of Rome as an imperial capital, and to the Romanization of indigenous peoples through Western Europe and the Mediterranean world.

CLARCH 433 / HISTART 433. Greek Sculpture
Upperclass standing, some preparation in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology or History of Art. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

History of Greek sculpture from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE. Treats free-standing statuary and relief and architectural sculpture in stone, bronze, terracotta, and gold and ivory. Examines evolving functions of Greek sculpture, and relationships between stylistic development and social and political change.

CLARCH 435 / HISTART 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 439 / HISTART 439. Greek Vase Painting
Upperclass standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 440 / HISTART 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 481 / HISTART 481. Art of Ancient Iran
Upperclass standing and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 482. Ceramic Analysis
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Pottery is one of the most common artifact types found during archaeological fieldwork. This course provides students with an array of practical and theoretical tools for working with ancient pottery, from analyzing fabrics and forming methods, to addressing the scale of production and broad-scale distribution patterns.

CLARCH 520. Early Rome and Her Neighbors
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course will cover the history an archaeology of Tyrrhenian Central Italy during the formative period of Etruscan and Latin city-states (10th-5th century BCE). Particular focus will be on the case of Early Rome, with its complex layering of literary sources and new archaeological.

CLARCH 534 / HISTART 534. Ancient Painting
Upperclass standing, HISTART 101 and either HISTART/CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 536 / HISTART 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
HISTART 101; one of CLARCH 221 or 222 or HISTART 221 or 222; and Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

CLARCH 600. Proseminar in Classical Archaeology
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 820 / HISTART 820. Approaches to Archaeological Field Survey
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

CLARCH 822 / HISTART 822. Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 828. Ceramic Analysis and Chronology
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 831. Theoretical Approaches in Classical Art and Archaeology
Graduate standing and some prior knowledge of classical art or archaeology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course is designed to offer students the chance to engage with and debate some of the major theoretical trends which have affected the study of ancient material culture, broadly construed. Readings include extracts from seminal theoretical works (Bourdieu, Giddens, Marx, Hillier and Hanson, etc.) and examples of ways in which those works have affected work on ancient material culture.

CLARCH 841 / HISTART 841. Topography of Rome
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 844 / HISTART 844. Theoretical Issues in Archaeology
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 855 / HISTART 855. Problems in Roman Archaeology
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

The proposed course is designed to promote flexibility in our graduate teaching in Roman archaeology (as part of the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology). Having such a 'open' course title available will encourage faculty to experiment with new seminars on their own current research, or on a subject of interest to a body of graduate students, without having to generate course proposals well ahead of time and without multiplying course numbers endlessly. Similarly structured course titles are available in related subjects (e.g. CA 849 - Problems in Greek Sculpture; CA 850 - Problems in Roman Sculpture) and seem to work quite well. Projected seminars to be held under this heading include: Problems in Roman Archaeology: Dynamics of Resistance and Accommodation, and Problems in Roman Archaeology: The Roman East.

CLARCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

CLARCH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

CLARCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Classical Civilization (CLCIV)
CLCIV 456. Egypt after the Pharaohs: Public and Private Life in an Ancient Multicultural Society
CLCIV 101, or HISTORY 200 or 201, or an introductory class in Egyptian archaeology or history; or CLCIV 102, or CLARCH 221 or 222, or HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will study a major ancient culture under Greek and Roman rule. We will begin with a historical and geographic overview; proceed with diachronic case studies on themes such as daily life, ethnicity, gender, religion, army, administration, and social mobility; and conclude with its influence on modern popular culture.

CLCIV 464. The Ancient Epic
(3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLCIV 466 / RELIGION 468. Greek Religion
(3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLCIV 476 / HISTORY 405 / RELIGION 476. Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
(4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

The course, will trace the formation of Christian ideas and modes of conduct in the Roman empire, examine religion both as a form of cultural and political expression and as a method of establishing a variety of contacts with a supernatural world. We thus begin with an analysis of what, was meant by culture and politics, while also looking at different ways of constructing a supernatural world.

CLCIV 483 / ACABS 421 / RELIGION 488. Christianity and Hellenistic Civilizations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar course covers a number of topics exploring the relationship between Christianity as a religious tradition in antiquity and the cultural and social traditions of the ancient Mediterranean.

Classical Linguistics (CLLING)
CLLING 599. Directed Reading
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

CLLING 635. Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLLING 870. Topics in Classical Linguistics
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

The class will explore topics in the ancient languages of the Greco-Roman world.

CLLING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

CLLING 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Greek (GREEK)
GREEK 401. Readings in Classical Greek Prose
GREEK 302. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

GREEK 402. Greek Drama
GREEK 302. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. W.

GREEK 410. Elementary Greek Prose
GREEK 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to give practice in writing correct Attic Greek idiom. This course includes weekly compositions along with grammatical and stylistic exercises, not only in Greek prose but also epigrams.

GREEK 462. Plato: Republic
GREEK 401. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course introduces students to the Greek Text of one of the early philosophical works central to Western civilization. A selection of readings from Plato's 10-book work focuses on ethics, government, civic ideals and the place of the arts in Plato's ideal city.

GREEK 463. Plato: Dialogues
GREEK 401. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Selections from Plato's dialogue frame discussion of the development of Greek philosophy, and of the place of the philosopher in the city-state. Particular attention is paid to Greek conceptualization of abstract ideals, and the socio-cultural terms in which these are debated.

GREEK 466. Polybius
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Selections from the Hellenistic historian Polybius, brought to Rome as a prisoner to war and a major source for following the rise of Rome as an international political power in the eastern Mediterranean. The course also considers Polybius' place in the Greek historiographical tradition.

GREEK 470. Topics in Greek Literature
Consent of department required. (3). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course explores a topic in ancient culture through extensive reading of primary texts in the original language. Students will read, translate and discuss a variety of texts relevant to the topics.

GREEK 499. Supervised Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in Greek Language and Literature or Classical Languages and Literatures. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F, W, Sp, Su.

GREEK 501. Special Reading Course in Greek
First-year Graduate student or permission. (1 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 502. Elementary Greek
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 503. Elementary Greek
GREEK 502 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 504. Intensive Elementary Greek
(6). May not be repeated for credit.

A rapid but thorough treatment of the forms and grammatical principles of the Greek language, designed for those who wish to accelerate study of the language (The equivalent in one academic term of Greek 1 and Greek 2). The course presents the basics of the vocabulary, inflection, and grammar of classical Attic Greek and prepares the student to read classical Greek texts with the help of a dictionary.

GREEK 506. Advanced Greek Composition
GREEK 410. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 507. Second Year Greek I
GREEK 503 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 508. Second Year Greek II
GREEK 507 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 556. Greek Philosophical Literature I
Graduate standing in Classical Studies or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 591. History of Greek Literature, Homer to Sophocles
20 credits of GREEK. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 592. History of Greek Literature, Euripides to the Romances
GREEK 591. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 599. Supervised Reading in Greek
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

GREEK 600 / LATIN 600. Methods of Classical Scholarship
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This is an introduction to bibliography, research, tools and methods.

GREEK 602 / LATIN 602. Classics as a Profession
Graduate standing in Classics, IPGRH or IPCAA. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course will introduce issues in the academic career in Classical Studies. We will address: selecting research topics, conferences, and publication venues; networking; preparing course syllabi; academic politics; writing teaching and research statements; and how to be a good but not exploited colleague.

GREEK 633. Introduction to Greek Meter
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 636. Paleography and Textual Criticism
Knowledge of Greek is essential. This course is for graduate students, but advanced undergraduates may be admitted at the discretion of the instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the evolution of Greek handwriting and book-production from the 4th century B.C. to the Renaissance. Topics include the nature of papyrus-rolls, the transition from roll to codex, the evolution of scripts from capitals to minuscule, and dating the literary papyri and parchment codices. Classes consist of seminars giving practice in deciphering Greek manuscripts, including those in Michigan's unique collection.

GREEK 637. Introduction to the Language and Interpretation of Papyri
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 669. Ancient Literary Criticism
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 801. Epic
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will introduce the Greek epic, with reading from the Homeric epics, fragmentary epics, and/or Apollonius. It will stress the students' understanding of the development of this genre and the scholarly debates about it.

GREEK 807. Aristophanes
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 830. Topics in Post-Aristotelian Philosophy
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This is a topics course designed as a graduate seminar with rotating instructors. Its purpose is to meet the intellectual needs of Classics graduate students with regard to developments in scholarship that revolves around later, and in some cases, fragmentary texts. Examples of later philosophers under study in this course may include but are not limited to: Lucretius, Plutarch, Marcus Aurelius, and man others.

GREEK 840 / LATIN 840. Theory and Practice in Classical Reception Studies
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course introduces students to critical, historical, and pedagogical approaches to Classical Reception Studies, a field of research and teaching exploring the dialogue of present and past in the construction of the Classic legacy, by working through case studies of American engagements with Greece since 1900 in several media and spheres.

GREEK 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

GREEK 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

GREEK 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Great Books Program (GTBOOKS)
GTBOOKS 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Latin (LATIN)
LATIN 401. Republican Prose
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. F.

LATIN 402. Imperial Prose
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. W.

LATIN 409. Augustan Poetry
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Vergil or Horace or the Elegists.

LATIN 410. Poetry of the Republic or Later Empire
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. W.

LATIN 421 / EDCURINS 421. Teaching of Latin
Junior standing in Latin and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

LATIN 426. Practicum
Consent of instructor required. Junior or senior standing. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. F, W, Su. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This practicum introduces students to the fundamentals of tutoring students at the elementary and intermediate levels of Latin, both in the Latin and Greek Study Center and one-on-one with individual students.

LATIN 435 / MEMS 440. Postclassical Latin I
Two years of college Latin. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 436 / MEMS 441. Postclassical Latin II
Two years of college Latin. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 441. Vergil, Aeneid
(3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 443. Latin Elegy
At least one intermediate LATIN course (LATIN 401, 402, 409, 410). (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in LATIN 551. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Selected poems of Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid. The course traces the development of elegy as a genre and situates the poems in the political, social, and literary environment of Augustan Rome.

LATIN 444. Ovid
At least one intermediate LATIN course (LATIN 401, 402, 409, 410). (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Selections from Ovid's love poetry. Metamorphoses. Fasti, and exile poetry. The course explores Ovid's allusive style, dynamic shaping of genre, and pointed commentary on Augustus' consolidation of power at Rome.

LATIN 469. Augustine the Philosopher
LATIN 402. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

In this class, we read texts from Augustine's vast oeuvre that show his importance as a philosopher. He is in a way the last of the ancient philosophers and perhaps the first of the moderns. Certainly many of his concerns, the nature of radical evil, the relationship between soul and body, the possibility of self-knowledge, the theory of the just war, arguments against Skepticism, are still vital questions for which we turn to Augustine as a still relevant interlocutor.

LATIN 473. The Age of Nero
At least one intermediate LATIN course (LATIN 401, 402, 409, 410). (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Readings may be drawn from authors such as Lucan (epic), Seneca (letters, drama, philosophical essays), Petronius (novel) and Persius (satire). Focus on style, theatricality and features that distinguish the writing of this period.

LATIN 490. Martial and Roman Epigram
LATIN 301. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 499. Latin: Supervised Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in Greek Language and Literature or Classical Languages and Literatures. F, W, Sp, Su.

LATIN 500. Special Reading Course in Latin
Graduate Standing in Classical Studies: Latin. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 503. Intensive Reading of Latin
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 504. Intensive Latin
Consent of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed LATIN 102, 193, or 502. Sp.

This course is designed to provide the student having little or no prior knowledge of Latin with the skills necessary for reading Classical and Mediaeval Latin. It covers the first two semesters of college Latin, using "Latin for Reading" by Knudsvig, Seligson, and Craig. We shall read both adapted texts and selections from various authors like Caesar, Plautus, Catullus, Martial and Eutropius. Students will also have an opportunity to read Latin prose and poetry authors of their choice during the course.

LATIN 505. Intermediate Latin
LATIN 502 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 506. Advanced Latin Composition
LATIN 403. (3). May not be repeated for credit. F.

LATIN 507. Late Latin
LATIN 502 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The purpose of the course is to read a reach selection of post-classical texts (200 AD and later) and to prepare students to appreciate the language, style and the rhetorical technique of Late Latin authors. While solidifying student's control over the essentials of Classical Latin grammar, the course will highlight the differences between Classical and Late Latin. Along with early Christian texts (Augustine, Jerome, Ambrose), the course includes a sampling of mediaeval authors such a Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, Abelart, Heloise and Hildegard of Bingen.

LATIN 511. Cicero's Letters
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed LATIN 464.

An introduction to Cicero's letters, with attention to their historical context and style and to Cicero's self-presentation. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with their understanding of Cicero and his times.

LATIN 512. Cicero's Orations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Reading of selected orations of Cicero, with attention to their style, rhetorical techniques and purposes, and historical context. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with the understanding of Cicero and his times.

LATIN 513. Cicero's Philosophical Writings
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Reading of selections from the philosophical or rhetorical treaties of Cicero, with attention to their style, historical context, argument, and place in the history of philosophy. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with their understanding of Cicero.

LATIN 576. Readings in Roman Society
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

During the past two decades, our understanding of the Roman family has been revolutionized by scholars who have sharply questioned the realism of the law that governed these families. Roman law is uncompromising in two main respects: marriage is not only easy to enter, but easy to end, so such an extent that the marriage bond appears to weak to be socially sustainable; on the other hand, the male head of the Roman household (pater familias) has such absolute power over his descendants, no matter their age, as to make them seem little more than his servant. Modern historians have critically reexamined whether these sources amount to what they seem, particularly when they are juxtaposed with literary sources describing Roman private life. This course will take up the debate, allowing students to decide for themselves regarding a lively and on-going dispute. In the process, students will learn how to think about the social implications of legal sources, an issue of some significance also in the modern world.

LATIN 591. History of Roman Literature, Beginnings to Cicero
CLASSICS,Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 592. History of Roman Literature, Vergil to Ausonius
LATIN 591 or twelve credits in advanced Latin reading courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 599. Supervised Reading in Latin Literature
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

LATIN 600 / GREEK 600. Methods of Classical Scholarship
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This is an introduction to bibliography, research, tools and methods.

LATIN 602 / GREEK 602. Classics as a Profession
Graduate standing in Classics, IPGRH or IPCAA. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course will introduce issues in the academic career in Classical Studies. We will address: selecting research topics, conferences, and publication venues; networking; preparing course syllabi; academic politics; writing teaching and research statements; and how to be a good but not exploited colleague.

LATIN 641. Introduction to Latin Palaeography
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 669. Ancient Literary Criticism
CLASSICS,Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will focus on the literary-critical poems of Horace and their sources, i.e. the Ars Poetica and Literary Epistles as defined by N. Rudd's edition, observing how Horace transforms Hellenistic literary-critical material to his own poetic purposes. As essential background we will first study Aristotle's Poetics and literary-critical fragments and extracts from the On Poems of Philodemus, through whom the tradition was passed to Horace.

LATIN 801. Roman Epic
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Roman epic poetry. The course may include a variety of authors or focus on one or two.

LATIN 802. Roman Drama
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Roman drama. The course may include both tragedy and comedy, or focus on a single author, and it may include consideration of the fragments of early Latin drama.

LATIN 834. Latin Literature of the Second Century
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Latin literature of the reigns of Nerva through Marcus Aurelius. Reading may focus on a single author or include selections from several (Pliny the Younger, Tacitus, Juvenal). Some reading may be in Greek.

LATIN 840 / GREEK 840. Theory and Practice in Classical Reception Studies
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course introduces students to critical, historical, and pedagogical approaches to Classical Reception Studies, a field of research and teaching exploring the dialogue of present and past in the construction of the Classic legacy, by working through case studies of American engagements with Greece since 1900 in several media and spheres.

LATIN 860. Ancient Religion
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will introduce students to the various aspects of Roman religion at the state and individual level, through literary, archaeological, and epigraphic material.

LATIN 870. Topics in Roman Literature
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This class will explore theoretical and historical approaches to a specific topic in Latin literature.

LATIN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

LATIN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

LATIN 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Modern Greek (MODGREEK)
MODGREEK 501. Elementary Modern Greek I
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 101.

An introduction to the reading, writing, and speaking skills of modern demotic Greek, approached through oral-aural training and systematic study of grammar.

MODGREEK 502. Elementary Modern Greek II
MODGREEK 501 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 102.

The second part of an introduction to the readings, writing, and speaking skills of modern demotic Greek, approached through oral-aural training and systematic study of grammar.

MODGREEK 503. Second Year Modern Greek I
MODGREEK 502 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 201.

This course is designed to improve students' speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. It begins with a thorough review of materials taught in the first year and continues with the completion of grammar and syntax and the introduction of new vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on linguistic accuracy in speaking and writing. In addition to the familiar drills, homework includes more creative writing in the form of journalistic prose, short stories, literary excerpts, films, and television materials.

MODGREEK 504. Second Year Modern Greek II
MODGREEK 503 or equivalent and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 202.

This course is designed to improve students' speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. It begins with a review of materials taught in the third semester and continues with the completion of grammar and syntax and the introduction of new vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on linguistic accuracy in speaking and writing. In addition to the familiar drills, homework includes a greater amount of creative writing in the form of journalistic prose, short stories, literary excerpts, films, and television materials.

MODGREEK 505. Intermediate Modern Greek, I
MODGREEK 504 or equivalent. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 301.

Selection from Modern Greek poetry and prose with grammar review and discussion of cultural content.

MODGREEK 506. Intermediate Modern Greek II
MODGREEK 505 or equivalent. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 302.

Selections from Modern Greek poetry and prose with grammar review and discussion of cultural context.

MODGREEK 599. Directed Reading
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

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