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Courses in LSA Classical Studies
Classical Archaeology (CLARCH)
CLARCH 420 / HISTART 430. Greece before History: The Art and Archaeology of Greek Lands ca 3500 to 700 BCE
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the origins, character and collapse of complex societies of the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean. Sources of evidence include architecture, artifacts, mortuary practices and the distribution of sites within the wider landscape. We also explore recent work on documentary sources, including the linear B (Mycenean) tablets.

CLARCH 422 / HISTART 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of the architecture, sculpture and painting of the Etruscans with special reference to Greek (and other) influences and the Etruscan impact on Rome.

CLARCH 424 / HISTART 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 425. Hellenistic and Republican Roman Architecture
CLARCH 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course covers the architecture of first millennium BCE Italy. It provides a sense of how later Roman architecture came into being by retracing its origins from the Iron Age to the Etruscan period. Hellenistic Italian architecture is analyzed within its proper Mediterranean context.

CLARCH 426. Roman Imperial Architecture
CLARCH 222/HISTART 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course surveys the architecture of the Roman empire from the reign of Augustus at the turn of the millennium to the reign of Justinian in the mid-sixth century A.D. Special attention is paid to the urban development of Rome as an imperial capital, and to the Romanization of indigenous peoples through Western Europe and the Mediterranean world.

CLARCH 433 / HISTART 433. Greek Sculpture
Upperclass standing, some preparation in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology or History of Art. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

History of Greek sculpture from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE. Treats free-standing statuary and relief and architectural sculpture in stone, bronze, terracotta, and gold and ivory. Examines evolving functions of Greek sculpture, and relationships between stylistic development and social and political change.

CLARCH 435 / HISTART 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 439 / HISTART 439. Greek Vase Painting
Upperclass standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 440 / HISTART 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 443 / HISTART 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization
Upperclass standing and CLARCH/HISTART 221. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The 8th and 7th centuries saw Greeks migrating from their home cities and countrysides to new settlements in many corners of the Mediterranean world. The course explores the art and archaeology of their colonization. They went South to Egypt and Libya, North to unoccupied tracts of Thrace, yet further North to explore the coasts of the Black Sea and its hinterland, and as far West as France and Spain. The most thoroughgoing of these new settlements were perhaps in Sicily and South Italy where new Greek cities came to rival the cities of their motherland in size, power, splendor and wealth.

CLARCH 480. Plants in Archaeology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course provides a background for the analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical data aimed at preparing students for the critical assessment of published archaeobotanical reports. Different macro and micro remains are introduced, with particular attention to carpological data. The lab portion of the course focuses on the practical hands-on aspects of sorting, identifying, and quantifying archaeobotanical macro-remains, with an emphasis on charred seeds. Identification training will focus primarily on the identification of major Old World crop seeds.

CLARCH 481 / HISTART 481. Art of Ancient Iran
Upperclass standing and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 534 / HISTART 534. Ancient Painting
Upperclass standing, HISTART 101 and either HISTART/CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 536 / HISTART 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
HISTART 101; one of CLARCH 221 or 222 or HISTART 221 or 222; and Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

CLARCH 600. Proseminar in Classical Archaeology
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 606 / LATIN 606. Latin Inscriptions
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 815 / HISTART 815. Hellenistic Cities of the Near East
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 820 / HISTART 820. Approaches to Archaeological Field Survey
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

CLARCH 822 / HISTART 822. Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 828. Ceramic Analysis and Chronology
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 831. Theoretical Approaches in Classical Art and Archaeology
Graduate standing and some prior knowledge of classical art or archaeology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course is designed to offer students the chance to engage with and debate some of the major theoretical trends which have affected the study of ancient material culture, broadly construed. Readings include extracts from seminal theoretical works (Bourdieu, Giddens, Marx, Hillier and Hanson, etc.) and examples of ways in which those works have affected work on ancient material culture.

CLARCH 832. Island Archaeology in the Mediterranean
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The island cultures of the Mediterranean have great archaeological distinctiveness. This seminar considers the concept of insularity itself, in cross-cultural archaeological, anthropological, and historical perspective, emphasizing some classics of the literature on Mediterranean island archaeology. A term paper will focus on any Mediterranean island or island group, in any period, employing theoretical constructs of insularity.

CLARCH 841 / HISTART 841. Topography of Rome
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 842 / HISTART 842. Topography and Monuments of Athens
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 844 / HISTART 844. Theoretical Issues in Archaeology
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 855 / HISTART 855. Problems in Roman Archaeology
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

The proposed course is designed to promote flexibility in our graduate teaching in Roman archaeology (as part of the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology). Having such a 'open' course title available will encourage faculty to experiment with new seminars on their own current research, or on a subject of interest to a body of graduate students, without having to generate course proposals well ahead of time and without multiplying course numbers endlessly. Similarly structured course titles are available in related subjects (e.g. CA 849 - Problems in Greek Sculpture; CA 850 - Problems in Roman Sculpture) and seem to work quite well. Projected seminars to be held under this heading include: Problems in Roman Archaeology: Dynamics of Resistance and Accommodation, and Problems in Roman Archaeology: The Roman East.

CLARCH 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

CLARCH 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

CLARCH 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Classical Civilization (CLCIV)
CLCIV 456. Egypt after the Pharaohs: Public and Private Life in an Ancient Multicultural Society
CLCIV 101, or HISTORY 200 or 201, or an introductory class in Egyptian archaeology or history; or CLCIV 102, or CLARCH 221 or 222, or HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will study a major ancient culture under Greek and Roman rule. We will begin with a historical and geographic overview; proceed with diachronic case studies on themes such as daily life, ethnicity, gender, religion, army, administration, and social mobility; and conclude with its influence on modern popular culture.

CLCIV 472. Roman Law
Sophomore or above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLCIV 476 / HISTORY 405 / RELIGION 476. Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
(4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

The course, will trace the formation of Christian ideas and modes of conduct in the Roman empire, examine religion both as a form of cultural and political expression and as a method of establishing a variety of contacts with a supernatural world. We thus begin with an analysis of what, was meant by culture and politics, while also looking at different ways of constructing a supernatural world.

CLCIV 483 / ACABS 421 / RELIGION 488. Christianity and Hellenistic Civilizations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar course covers a number of topics exploring the relationship between Christianity as a religious tradition in antiquity and the cultural and social traditions of the ancient Mediterranean.

Classical Linguistics (CLLING)
CLLING 599. Directed Reading
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

CLLING 602. From Latin to the Romance Languages
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the evolution of colloquial Latin from the Archaic period to the early stages of the Romance languages in the early Middle Ages. Textual evidence for the nature of colloquial Latin will be examined, such as from Roman comedy, the letters of Cicero, dialogues in Petronius and non-literary inscriptions.

CLLING 630. Greek Syntax
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines selected syntactic phenomena in Greek. Topics to be considered may include the ordering and distribution of particles; the effects of pragmatics and other discourse factors (such as backgrounding/foregrounding, focus, and topicalization) on phrasal and clausal word-order; discontinuous constituency; and diathesis and passivization.

CLLING 635. Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLLING 651. Mycenaean Greek
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the Greek of the Mycenaean period, its Linear B script, and the surviving documents.

CLLING 680. Topics in Greek and Latin Comparative Grammar
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

This course discusses in greater depth a selection of the topics and issues introduced in CLLING 635 and will train students in how to analyze and evaluate technical literature in comparative grammar.

CLLING 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

CLLING 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Greek (GREEK)
GREEK 401. Readings in Classical Greek Prose
GREEK 302. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

GREEK 402. Greek Drama
GREEK 302. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. W.

GREEK 410. Elementary Greek Prose
GREEK 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to give practice in writing correct Attic Greek idiom. This course includes weekly compositions along with grammatical and stylistic exercises, not only in Greek prose but also epigrams.

GREEK 438. Attic Orators
GREEK 401. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Reading and interpretation of ancient speeches by representative orators of the fourth century BCE, with attention both to style and to the legal and historical background.

GREEK 462. Plato: Republic
GREEK 401. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course introduces students to the Greek Text of one of the early philosophical works central to Western civilization. A selection of readings from Plato's 10-book work focuses on ethics, government, civic ideals and the place of the arts in Plato's ideal city.

GREEK 466. Polybius
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Selections from the Hellenistic historian Polybius, brought to Rome as a prisoner to war and a major source for following the rise of Rome as an international political power in the eastern Mediterranean. The course also considers Polybius' place in the Greek historiographical tradition.

GREEK 473 / ACABS 427. Advanced Koine
Two years of Greek, one term of New Testament Greek (300 level or equivalent). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Interpretation of selected New Testament texts with attention to philological, historical, and theological problems. This course also provides an introduction to questions of the textual transmission of New Testament writings.

GREEK 499. Supervised Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in Greek Language and Literature or Classical Languages and Literatures. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F, W, Sp, Su.

GREEK 501. Special Reading Course in Greek
First-year Graduate student or permission. (1 - 3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 502. Elementary Greek
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 503. Elementary Greek
GREEK 502 and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 504. Intensive Elementary Greek
(6). May not be repeated for credit.

A rapid but thorough treatment of the forms and grammatical principles of the Greek language, designed for those who wish to accelerate study of the language (The equivalent in one academic term of Greek 1 and Greek 2). The course presents the basics of the vocabulary, inflection, and grammar of classical Attic Greek and prepares the student to read classical Greek texts with the help of a dictionary.

GREEK 506. Advanced Greek Composition
GREEK 410. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 507. Second Year Greek I
GREEK 503 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 508. Second Year Greek II
GREEK 507 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 511. Hesiod and Hymns
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about non-Homeric Greek hexameter poetry, including such questions as performance occasions, traditionality, and social function. Readings from Hesiod and/or selected Homeric Hymns.

GREEK 512. Greek Epic
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Homer and other Greek epic, including such questions as language, performance occasions, traditionality, and social function.

GREEK 513. Greek Lyric
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Selections from poets including Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon, and Simonides. Elegy and iambic poetry may also be included, as well as Pindar and Bacchylides.

GREEK 514. Elegy and Lambic
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Greek elegy and iambus, including such questions as performance occasions, traditionality, and social function.

GREEK 515. Pindar and Bacchylides
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Close reading of select poems of Pindar and/or Bacchylides. The course will emphasize understanding the difficult Greek and progression of thought in epinician poetry, and will notice major interpretive approaches.

GREEK 516. Early Greek Prose
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of relevant scholarly debates. Reading will be selected from fragments of the Presocratics and early historians and from fifth-century prose authors.

GREEK 517. Presocratics
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 518. Greek Tragedy
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Greek tragedy. Readings may be drawn from a single tragedian or from more than one.

GREEK 521. Euripides
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the drama of Euripides. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of the language of Greek tragedy as well as to familiarize them with scholarly issues surrounding Euripides and his place in Athenian history and culture.

GREEK 522. Herodotus
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Herodotus, including such questions as the composition of his work intellectual and religious attitudes, and reliability.

GREEK 523. Thucydides
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

We will read selections from Thucydides in Greek. The course will stress mastery of Thucydides' difficult style, along with an introduction to his historical method and relevant scholarly debates.

GREEK 524. Attic Orators
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about the Attic orators, including such question as relation between text and original occasion, Athenian morality, Greek law, and rhetoric.

GREEK 525. Fifth Century Prose
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of the development of prose literature. Readings will be selected from Herodotus, Thucydides, the Hippocratic corpus, Antiphon, and Gorgias.

GREEK 526. Old Comedy
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Selections from Aristophanes and fragments of Old Comedy. This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about fifth-century Greek comedy.

GREEK 527. Plato the Philosopher
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Plato's place in the history of Greek philosophy and thought.

GREEK 528. Plato as Literary Artist
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Plato, with special attention to style, characterization, and dramatic form.

GREEK 531. Socratic Literature
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Socratic literature. Reading will be selected from Plato, Xenophon, and the minor Socratics.

GREEK 532. Greek Historiography
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will introduce the Greek historian; readings may come from Herodotus, Thucydides, Zenophon, Ploybius, along with fragments of historian whose works are not extant. It will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Greek historical writing.

GREEK 533. Isocrates
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of scholarly debates about Isocrates, with attention to his style, use of traditional themes, and place in political and intellectual history.

GREEK 534. New Comedy
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Demosthenes' role in Athenian history and of his speeches in Greek literature.

GREEK 536. Bucolic Poetry
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Theocritus and other bucolic poets.

GREEK 537. Callimachus
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Callimachus and his importance in the history of ancient literature. Reading selected from his hymns, Aetia, epigrams, Hecale, and Iambi.

GREEK 538. Theocritus
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Theocritus and his place in the history of Greek and later literature. Reading selected from both the bucolic poetry and the "urban mimes."

GREEK 539. Apollonius
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the epic of Apollonius Rhodius. The course will seek to improve students' fluency in reading Greek while also presenting Apollonius in his literary and historical context.

GREEK 540. Hellenistic Poetry
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek and introduce the variety of Hellenistic poetry. Readings selected from both major and minor authors, including epigram, mime, and iambic poetry.

GREEK 541. Hellenistic Prose
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Hellenistic literature and culture. Readings selected from Polybius, fragments of Hellenistic historians, Parthenius, and Jewish literature such as the "Letter of Aristeas."

GREEK 542. Imperial Prose
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of Greek literature of the Empire. Readings selected from Plutarch, Lucian, Aelius Aristides, Marcus Aurelius, Philostratus, and other imperial authors. Poets may also be included.

GREEK 544. Christian Literature
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' ability to read imperial Greek along with their understanding of the development of Christian thought and of the connections between pagan and Christian writing.

GREEK 550. Lyric Poetry
GREEK 301 and 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 554. Plato: Meno and other Early Dialogues
GREEK 302. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 556. Greek Philosophical Literature I
Graduate standing in Classical Studies or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 561. Ancient Science
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to basic texts of Greek science and mathematics. Readings selected from the Hippocratic corpus and other medical literature, Euclid and other mathematical texts, Ptolemy and other astronomical work.

GREEK 562. Novel
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the improvement of students' Greek along with their understanding of the ancient novel, its literary antecedents and its place in ancient literature. Readings selected from Chariton, Xenophon, Heliodorus, and Longus.

GREEK 563. Ancient Literary Criticism
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Readings in the most important works of literary criticism and rhetoric. Readings selected from texts such as Aristotle's Poetics and Rhetoric, Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Philodemus, Horace, and Longinus.

GREEK 580. Greek and Latin -- This course will emphasize the close reading of related Greek and Latin texts from a selected genre or period. A knowledge of Latin as well as Greek is recommended.
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 591. History of Greek Literature, Homer to Sophocles
20 credits of GREEK. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 592. History of Greek Literature, Euripides to the Romances
GREEK 591. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 599. Supervised Reading in Greek
Consent of instructor required. Permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

GREEK 600 / LATIN 600. Methods of Classical Scholarship
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This is an introduction to bibliography, research, tools and methods.

GREEK 602 / LATIN 602. Classics as a Profession
Graduate standing in Classics, IPGRH or IPCAA. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course will introduce issues in the academic career in Classical Studies. We will address: selecting research topics, conferences, and publication venues; networking; preparing course syllabi; academic politics; writing teaching and research statements; and how to be a good but not exploited colleague.

GREEK 633. Introduction to Greek Meter
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 637. Introduction to the Language and Interpretation of Papyri
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 669. Ancient Literary Criticism
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 801. Epic
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will introduce the Greek epic, with reading from the Homeric epics, fragmentary epics, and/or Apollonius. It will stress the students' understanding of the development of this genre and the scholarly debates about it.

GREEK 802. Lyric
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will introduce students to Greek lyric (this may include elegaic and iambic poetry). It will stress the students' understanding of the development of this genre and the scholarly debates about it.

GREEK 803. Tragedy
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will stress the student's understanding of the development of tragedy and the scholarly debates about it. The reading may include works by the three major tragedians, fragments, and/or tragedies widely thought to be falsely attributed.

GREEK 804. Early Historiography
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

A seminar exploring early Greek historiography through the lens of such historians as Thucydides and Herodutus. For example, students will learn to read Thucydides in the original Greek with accuracy and enjoyment. Students will then explore a series of topics in Thucydidean studies, for example his narrative technique, historical method, and political thought. We will be particularly concerned with Thucydides' place in late fifth century historical, political and scientific intellectual trends.

GREEK 805. Later Historiography
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

This course will introduce students to the historiographical writings in Greek literature from the classical through the imperial periods. It may stress particular authors or times. It will seek to provide students with an understanding of the genre and of scholarly debates about the authors treated.

GREEK 806 / HISTORY 806. Greek Law and Rhetoric
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GREEK 830. Topics in Post-Aristotelian Philosophy
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This is a topics course designed as a graduate seminar with rotating instructors. Its purpose is to meet the intellectual needs of Classics graduate students with regard to developments in scholarship that revolves around later, and in some cases, fragmentary texts. Examples of later philosophers under study in this course may include but are not limited to: Lucretius, Plutarch, Marcus Aurelius, and man others.

GREEK 834. Hellenistic/Imperial Literature and Culture
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

This seminar will examine a genre of particular period or context within Greek literature of the Hellenistic and/or Imperial period(s). Topics could include epigram, Jewish-Greek literature, didactic poetry, miniature epic, poets and patrons, or the city of Alexandria.

GREEK 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

GREEK 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

GREEK 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Great Books Program (GTBOOKS)
GTBOOKS 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Latin (LATIN)
LATIN 401. Republican Prose
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. F.

LATIN 402. Imperial Prose
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. W.

LATIN 403. Elementary Latin Composition
LATIN 301. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Systematic reviews in Latin grammar with daily written exercises. Emphasis on correctness of expression and a feeling of idiom.

LATIN 409. Augustan Poetry
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Vergil or Horace or the Elegists.

LATIN 410. Poetry of the Republic or Later Empire
LATIN 301 or 302 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. W.

LATIN 421 / EDCURINS 421. Teaching of Latin
Junior standing in Latin and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

LATIN 426. Practicum
Consent of instructor required. Junior or senior standing. (1 - 4). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. F, W, Su. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This practicum introduces students to the fundamentals of tutoring students at the elementary and intermediate levels of Latin, both in the Latin and Greek Study Center and one-on-one with individual students.

LATIN 435 / MEMS 440. Postclassical Latin I
Two years of college Latin. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 441. Vergil, Aeneid
(3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 442. Didactic Poetry
At least one intermediate LATIN course (LATIN 401, 402, 409, 410). (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Focusing on Lucretius' de Rerum Natura, this course explores the central tenets of Epicureanism, the poetic framework for philosophical discourse, and the author's didactic method.

LATIN 460. Tacitus
At least one intermediate LATIN course (LATIN 401, 402, 409, 410). (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

An introduction to Tacitus' work with attention to style, socio-political context and outlook, and historiographical technique.

LATIN 490. Martial and Roman Epigram
LATIN 301. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 499. Latin: Supervised Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in Greek Language and Literature or Classical Languages and Literatures. F, W, Sp, Su.

LATIN 500. Special Reading Course in Latin
Graduate Standing in Classical Studies: Latin. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 503. Intensive Reading of Latin
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 504. Intensive Latin
Consent of instructor required. (6). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed LATIN 102, 193, or 502. Sp.

This course is designed to provide the student having little or no prior knowledge of Latin with the skills necessary for reading Classical and Mediaeval Latin. It covers the first two semesters of college Latin, using "Latin for Reading" by Knudsvig, Seligson, and Craig. We shall read both adapted texts and selections from various authors like Caesar, Plautus, Catullus, Martial and Eutropius. Students will also have an opportunity to read Latin prose and poetry authors of their choice during the course.

LATIN 505. Intermediate Latin
LATIN 502 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 506. Advanced Latin Composition
LATIN 403. (3). May not be repeated for credit. F.

LATIN 507. Late Latin
LATIN 502 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The purpose of the course is to read a reach selection of post-classical texts (200 AD and later) and to prepare students to appreciate the language, style and the rhetorical technique of Late Latin authors. While solidifying student's control over the essentials of Classical Latin grammar, the course will highlight the differences between Classical and Late Latin. Along with early Christian texts (Augustine, Jerome, Ambrose), the course includes a sampling of mediaeval authors such a Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, Abelart, Heloise and Hildegard of Bingen.

LATIN 510. Roman Comedy
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Roman comedy, with readings from Plautus and/or Terence. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with their understanding of Roman comedy as a genre, its relation to Greek comedy and to other Latin literature, and its historical context.

LATIN 511. Cicero's Letters
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed LATIN 464.

An introduction to Cicero's letters, with attention to their historical context and style and to Cicero's self-presentation. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with their understanding of Cicero and his times.

LATIN 512. Cicero's Orations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Reading of selected orations of Cicero, with attention to their style, rhetorical techniques and purposes, and historical context. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with the understanding of Cicero and his times.

LATIN 513. Cicero's Philosophical Writings
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Reading of selections from the philosophical or rhetorical treaties of Cicero, with attention to their style, historical context, argument, and place in the history of philosophy. The course will seek to improve students' knowledge of Latin along with their understanding of Cicero.

LATIN 514. Lucretius
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the poetry of Lucretius, with attention both to its importance in the history of literature and is epicurean teaching. The course will stress improving students' Latin.

LATIN 518. Latin Elegy
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the genre of Latin elegy, with reading selected from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. The course will seek both to improve students' Latin and to explore the development of the genre.

LATIN 519. Vergil: Aeneid
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to issues surrounding the interpretation of the epic, its place in the history of literature, and its historical context. The course will also seek to improve students' ability to understand Vergil's Latin and to appreciate his style.

LATIN 520. Vergil: Eclogues and Georgics
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Virgil's bucolic and didactic poetry, with attention to his literary models, historical context, and style, as well as to interpretive problems.

LATIN 522. Horace
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course may include a selection from Horace's poetry in all genres (lyric, epode, satire, and epistle), or focus on only one. It will consider such issues as Horace's predecessors, his poetic persona, his relations with Augustus, and his influence.

LATIN 523. Seneca
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Seneca, with reading from his prose and/or dramas. This course will seek to improve students' Latin as well as to familiarize them with Seneca's style, his place in history of Latin literature and philosophy, and his historical context.

LATIN 524. Ovid
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the style, historical context, and literary interpretation of Ovidian poetry. The course will emphasize students' ability to read and understand Ovid's Latin. In-class translation, secondary reading, and a paper will be required.

LATIN 526. Satire
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we study the genre of Satire in Roman literature, with readings selected from the fragments of Lucilius, the satires of horace, Persius, and Juvenal, Seneca's Apocolocythosis, and Petronius' Satyricon.

LATIN 530. Latin Novel
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 535. Petronius
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This class will treat Petronius's Satyricon with special attention to its literary aspects, including genre, form, style, characterization, allusion, and narrative technique. We will consider the problem of its authorship, data, and possible Neronian context, as well as its pervasive concern with interactions between Greek and Roman culture.

LATIN 550. Constantine and his Age
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An analysis of the sources for the reign of Constantine, including, but not limited to, the Latin epiomators, Lactantius, documentary sources and panygerics; attention is also give to ecclesiastical sources (including, but not limited to, Optatus of Milevis). Somke reading is in Greek.

LATIN 576. Readings in Roman Society
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

During the past two decades, our understanding of the Roman family has been revolutionized by scholars who have sharply questioned the realism of the law that governed these families. Roman law is uncompromising in two main respects: marriage is not only easy to enter, but easy to end, so such an extent that the marriage bond appears to weak to be socially sustainable; on the other hand, the male head of the Roman household (pater familias) has such absolute power over his descendants, no matter their age, as to make them seem little more than his servant. Modern historians have critically reexamined whether these sources amount to what they seem, particularly when they are juxtaposed with literary sources describing Roman private life. This course will take up the debate, allowing students to decide for themselves regarding a lively and on-going dispute. In the process, students will learn how to think about the social implications of legal sources, an issue of some significance also in the modern world.

LATIN 580. Greek and Latin
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will emphasize the close reading of related Greek and Latin texts from selected genre or period. A knowledge of Latin as well as Greek is recommended.

LATIN 591. History of Roman Literature, Beginnings to Cicero
CLASSICS,Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 592. History of Roman Literature, Vergil to Ausonius
LATIN 591 or twelve credits in advanced Latin reading courses. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 599. Supervised Reading in Latin Literature
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

LATIN 600 / GREEK 600. Methods of Classical Scholarship
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This is an introduction to bibliography, research, tools and methods.

LATIN 602 / GREEK 602. Classics as a Profession
Graduate standing in Classics, IPGRH or IPCAA. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course will introduce issues in the academic career in Classical Studies. We will address: selecting research topics, conferences, and publication venues; networking; preparing course syllabi; academic politics; writing teaching and research statements; and how to be a good but not exploited colleague.

LATIN 606 / CLARCH 606. Latin Inscriptions
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 642. Introduction to Roman Law
Graduate standing only. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

LATIN 801. Roman Epic
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Roman epic poetry. The course may include a variety of authors or focus on one or two.

LATIN 802. Roman Drama
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Roman drama. The course may include both tragedy and comedy, or focus on a single author, and it may include consideration of the fragments of early Latin drama.

LATIN 808. Roman Historiography
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Roman historiography. The course may include a variety of authors or focus on one or two.

LATIN 809. The Latin Novel
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on the Latin novel (Petronius, Apuleius, or both may be read).

LATIN 832. Literature of the Age of Nero
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Latin literature of the Neronian period. This course may treat Lucan, Petronius, or Seneca, or select from several authors.

LATIN 833. Literature of the Flavian Period
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Latin literature of the Flavian period. The course may focus on a single author, whether a poet (Martial, Valerius Flaccus) or prose author (pliny the Elder, Quintilian), or on several,.

LATIN 834. Latin Literature of the Second Century
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship on Latin literature of the reigns of Nerva through Marcus Aurelius. Reading may focus on a single author or include selections from several (Pliny the Younger, Tacitus, Juvenal). Some reading may be in Greek.

LATIN 853. Roman Rhetoric and Literary Criticism
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine key texts in Roman rhetoric and literary criticism from the Rhetorica ad Herennium. Horace's Ars Poetica to Quintilian's Institutio Oratoriae and Suetonius' de Grammaticals et Rhetoribus. Topics to be discussed will include the formatin of literary culture at Rome, the relationship between rhetoric and literature, and translation between Greek and Roman literary cultures.

LATIN 865. Roman Religion
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An introduction to the scholarship in Roman religion, including theoretical issues and the different sources (literary, epigraphical, archaeological).

LATIN 870. Topics in Roman Literature
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This class will explore theoretical and historical approaches to a specific topic in Latin literature.

LATIN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

LATIN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have GSI award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

LATIN 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Modern Greek (MODGREEK)
MODGREEK 501. Elementary Modern Greek I
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 101.

An introduction to the reading, writing, and speaking skills of modern demotic Greek, approached through oral-aural training and systematic study of grammar.

MODGREEK 502. Elementary Modern Greek II
MODGREEK 501 or permission of instructor. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 102.

The second part of an introduction to the readings, writing, and speaking skills of modern demotic Greek, approached through oral-aural training and systematic study of grammar.

MODGREEK 503. Second Year Modern Greek I
MODGREEK 502 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 201.

This course is designed to improve students' speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. It begins with a thorough review of materials taught in the first year and continues with the completion of grammar and syntax and the introduction of new vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on linguistic accuracy in speaking and writing. In addition to the familiar drills, homework includes more creative writing in the form of journalistic prose, short stories, literary excerpts, films, and television materials.

MODGREEK 504. Second Year Modern Greek II
MODGREEK 503 or equivalent and Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 202.

This course is designed to improve students' speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills. It begins with a review of materials taught in the third semester and continues with the completion of grammar and syntax and the introduction of new vocabulary. Emphasis is placed on linguistic accuracy in speaking and writing. In addition to the familiar drills, homework includes a greater amount of creative writing in the form of journalistic prose, short stories, literary excerpts, films, and television materials.

MODGREEK 505. Intermediate Modern Greek, I
MODGREEK 504 or equivalent. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 301.

Selection from Modern Greek poetry and prose with grammar review and discussion of cultural content.

MODGREEK 506. Intermediate Modern Greek II
MODGREEK 505 or equivalent. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed MODGREEK 302.

Selections from Modern Greek poetry and prose with grammar review and discussion of cultural context.

MODGREEK 599. Directed Reading
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

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