Graduate Course Catalog
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Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
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Courses in LSA Germanic Languages & Literatures
Dutch and Flemish Studies (DUTCH)
DUTCH 491. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature
Senior standing or permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in English.

DUTCH 492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in English. W.

DUTCH 511. First Special Speaking and Reading
Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed DUTCH 500.

DUTCH 512. Second Special Speaking and Reading
Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed DUTCH 500.

DUTCH 531. Second Year Dutch
DUTCH 512 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

DUTCH 532. Second Year Dutch
DUTCH 512 or equivalent. Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

DUTCH 901. Independent Graduate Study
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (2 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

German (GERMAN)
GERMAN 401 / HISTORY 416. Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of person to the nation, to the state, to history, and the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

GERMAN 402 / HISTORY 417. Twentieth-Century German and European Thought
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course will present a survey of the principal European intellectual movements of the twentieth century. We shall examine the interplay of political and cultural movements, and pay consistent attention to the difficulty of self-definition of the intellectual within rapidly changing social and cultural contexts. Socialism, Liberalism, Fascism, Surrealism, Existentialism, Cultural Marxism, Structuralism, Feminism, and Post-structuralism.

GERMAN 425. Advanced German
GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Various approaches will be utilized to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape or watch a videocassette concerning the history or culture of the German-speaking countries.

GERMAN 426. Advanced German
GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. W. Taught in German. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Various approaches will be utilized to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to tape or watch a videocassette concerning the history or culture of the German-speaking countries.

GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German
GERMAN 350 or one 300-level course beyond GERMAN 232, and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. W. Taught in German.

This course introduces students to the language of German business and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as: the geography of business and industry in German; the European Union and Germany's role therein; traffic, transportation and trade; social structure; economic structure; ecology. In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics.

GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation
(3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Taught in English. Rackham credit requires additional work.

GERMAN 454. German Romanticism
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be elected twice for credit. Taught in German. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Study of German prose literature (Novelle and novel) of the 20th Century.

GERMAN 470. Workshop in Translation
Two of the following courses: GERMAN 300, 325, 326, 332, 336, 350, 351, 357, 380, 385, 425, 426, 430, 431, 454, 457, 464, or 499. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces advanced German students to translation practices and theories, as well as to the business and advanced study of translation. We focus upon producing translations from German to English. We will orient ourselves around the professional standards and guidelines of the American Translators Association (ATA), so that students will receive direct experience with approaches to translation in a "real world" environment.

GERMAN 491. German Honors Proseminar
Senior Honors standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of GERMAN 492, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F.

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar
Senior Honors standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. W.

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Taught in German.

GERMAN 517 / ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GERMAN 531 / EDCURINS 431. Teaching Methods
Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (2 - 3). May not be repeated for credit. F.

GERMAN 540. Introduction to German Studies
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

GERMAN 701. Textual and Visual Interpretations
(3). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Seminars on various topics that explore textual and visual rhetoric, questions of genre and media, and relations between text and image. Students are exposed to and work with a broad definition of textuality (including music, film, and the visual arts as much as literature). Seminars also emphasize a theoretically-informed close analysis of texts from German-speaking Europe.

GERMAN 702. Textual and Visual Interpretations
(3). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Seminars on various topics that explore textual and visual rhetoric, questions of genre and media, and relations between text and image. Students are exposed to and work with a broad definition of textuality (including music, film, and the visual arts as much as literature). Seminars also emphasize a theoretically-informed close analysis of texts from German-speaking Europe.

GERMAN 731. Cultural and Historical Analysis
May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Seminars on various topics that focus on the concepts of history and culture as well as the relationship between the two. They use analytical tools and readings to engage with the field of pre-modern and modern German cultural history, to explore and challenge its contemporary practice, and to expand its vision.

GERMAN 732. Cultural and Historical Analysis
(3). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Seminars on various topics that focus on the concepts of history and culture as well as the relationship between the two. They use analytical tools and readings to engage with the field of pre-modern and modern German cultural history, to explore and challenge its contemporary practice, and to expand its vision.

GERMAN 762. Critical Theory and Philosophy
(3). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Seminars on various topics that explore issues in aesthetics, theories of language and subjectivity, and the genealogy of critical thought in continental philosophy. Authors include: Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, among others; Freud and Lacan (psychoanalysis); and Weber, Simmel, and Elias (sociology). They also may study the long legacy of critical thought throughout the twentieth century in the works of authors associated with the Frankfurt School (Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse, Habermas, Benjamin, and Kracauer), in post-structuralism, feminism, and post-colonial theory.

GERMAN 825. German Studies Colloquium
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 21 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course provides an interdisciplinary forum for scholarship in German Studies. It brings together graduate students and speakers from various disciplines within the University, as well as invited speakers and artists from across the US and Germany. Session formats very between seminars, formal presentations by invited speakers, and discussions of precirculated papers, including chapter drafts by advanced Ph.D. candidates. Topics vary from week to week. Requirements include regular response papers and other short, written assignments.

GERMAN 901. Directed Reading in German Literature and Linguistics
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

GERMAN 902. Directed Reading
Consent of instructor required. Permission of chair. Graduate standing. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

GERMAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

GERMAN 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

GERMAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Scandinavian Studies (SCAND)
SCAND 442. The Icelandic Saga (in English Translation)
Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Yiddish (YIDDISH)
YIDDISH 431 / JUDAIC 431. Beginning Yiddish 1 for Graduate Students
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 101 or YIDDISH 101. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 101 or YIDDISH 101. F.

This is the first of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish.

YIDDISH 432 / JUDAIC 432. Beginning Yiddish 2 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 431/YIDDISH 431 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 101/YIDDISH 101. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 102 or YIDDISH 102. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 102 or YIDDISH 102. W.

This is the second of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish .

YIDDISH 531 / JUDAIC 531. Intermediate Yiddish 1 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 432 or YIDDISH 432; or JUDAIC 102 YIDDISH 102; or placement exam. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 201 or YIDDISH 201. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 201 or YIDDISH 201. F.

This is the third term of a language sequence in Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed.

YIDDISH 532 / JUDAIC 532. Intermediate Yiddish 2 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 531/YIDDISH 531 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 201/YIDDISH 201. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 202 or YIDDISH 202. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 202 or YIDDISH 202. W.

This is the fourth term of a language sequence of Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed.

YIDDISH 631 / JUDAIC 631. Advanced Yiddish 1 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 532/YIDDISH 532 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 202/YIDDISH 202. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 301 or YIDDISH 301. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 301 or YIDDISH 301. F.

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music.

YIDDISH 632 / JUDAIC 632. Advanced Yiddish 2 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 631/YIDDISH 631 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 301/YIDDISH 301. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 302 or YIDDISH 302. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 302 or YIDDISH 302. W.

This is the final term of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music.

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