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Courses in LSA Near Eastern Studies
Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies (ACABS)
ACABS 613. Sumerian Literary Texts
ACABS 512. Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Arabic Studies (ARABIC)
ARABIC 401. Advanced Arabic I
ARABIC 202 (AAPTIS 202), ARABIC 203 (AAPTIS 205) completed with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) ARABIC 202 (AAPTIS 202), ARABIC 203 (AAPTIS 205) or assignment to ARABIC 401 by placement test. (5). May not be repeated for credit.

This is the first of a two semester sequence of Advanced level Arabic. Students learn to understand, speak, read and write Arabic at Advanced Low to Advanced Mid level in addition to learning cultural meanings of language.

ARABIC 402. Advanced Arabic II
ARABIC 401 (AAPTIS 403) (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) ARABIC 401 (AAPTIS 403) or by assignment to ARABIC 402 (AAPTIS 404) by placement test. (5). May not be repeated for credit.

This is the second of a two semester sequence of Advanced level Arabic. Students learn to understand, speak, read and write Arabic at Advanced Mid level in addition to learning cultural meanings of language.

ARABIC 410. Topics in Arabic Language
Completion of ARABIC 202. Students cannot elect the same topic twice. (3). May be elected twice for credit. Taught in Arabic.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with intermediate Arabic language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, film, history, etc. All material will be in Arabic, and the class will be taught in Arabic.

ARABIC 499. Independent Study in Arabic
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected three times for credit.

An independent study course in the area of Arabic. The intended language of instruction is Arabic. Approval from the department is required.

ARABIC 501. Advanced Arabic Conversation and Composition
ARABIC 402 (AAPTIS 404) or equivalent. Taught in Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The objectives of this course are to develop fluency and accuracy in understanding, speaking, and writing modern standard Arabic, and to expand students' awareness of Arab-Islamic culture and civilization. The course is based on a variety of literary texts and authentic cultural audio-visual materials.

ARABIC 503. Classical Arabic Grammar
Three years of Arabic study. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will approach the study of Arabic grammar in the same way as it was approached by traditional Arab grammarians. We will analyze the structure of Arabic discourse by applying Arabic grammatical terminology and highlighting the relationship of the lexical meaning of the term to its denoted function. Illustrative examples are taken from classical texts including but not limited to Qur'an, Hadith, literary prose and pre-Islamic poetry.

ARABIC 504. Advanced Arabic Media I
ARABIC 402 (AAPTIS 404) or equivalent. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Emphasizes developing ease and fluency in listening, speaking, reading and writing journalistic Arabic. Course material includes unedited news items and radio and television programs which serve as the basis for class discussion and writing summaries.

ARABIC 506. Arabic Phonology and Morphophonology
ARABIC 202 (AAPTIS 202) or ARABIC 203 (AAPTIS 205) (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed ARABIC 606.

Arabic Phonology and Morphology examines the phonetic, phonological, and morphophonological features of standard and dialectal Arabic.

ARABIC 507 / LING 433. Arabic Syntax and Semantics
ARABIC 202 (AAPTIS 202) or ARABIC 203 (AAPTIS 205) completed with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course examines generative syntactic theory, especially the notion of principles and parameters, as well as functional, cognitive, and lexical semantic approaches and their relevance of analysis to standard Arabic and at least one Arabic dialect, using as a reference point medieval Arabic grammar.

ARABIC 508. Arabic Historical Linguistics and Dialectology
ARABIC 202 (AAPTIS 202) or ARABIC 203 (AAPTIS 205) (completed with a minimum grade of C or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the development of the Arabic language from its origins to the present. The structure and development of Old, Middle, and Modern Arabic and their affinities to other indigenous dialects and languages are outlined. The historical implications of the development of communal dialects, sociolinguistic variation, and inherent linguistic variability are treated.

ARABIC 509. Arabic Second Language Acquisition
ARABIC 202 (AAPTIS 202) or ARABIC 203 (AAPTIS 205) completed with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Arabic second language acquisition examines: (1) how Arabic as a second/foreign language is learned, (2) what factors contribute to different learning outcomes and variability, and (3) how second language learners of Arabic with different native language backgrounds can attain superior or near native competence. Research findings on Arabic and other languages are explored not only from the perspective of the researcher, but also from that of the teacher. Hence, the course helps students in developing skills to interpret research findings as well as using relevant findings to inform teaching.

ARABIC 510. Topics in Arabic Language
ARABIC 402 or advanced proficiency. Students may not take the same topic twice. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with advanced Arabic language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, film, history, etc. All material will be in Arabic, and the class will be taught in Arabic.

ARABIC 513. Arabic-English Translation: Theory and Practice
Completion of ARABIC 402 or permission of the instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Examines linguistic and textual issues at the word, sentence, and discourse levels and explores methods of translation and the translator's latitude in reconstructing the meaning of the source text. Taught in English.

ARABIC 600. Reading Modern Arab Authors in Arabic
ARABIC 402, ARABIC 501, or permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Selected texts (novels, short stories, poetry, and personal interviews), written by modern Arab authors in the last two decades, will read and discussed in Arabic, with a special emphasis on the language and strategies of narration, cultural contextualizations and the sheer pleasure of reading an original text.

ARABIC 601. Modern Arabic Fiction
ARABIC 402 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama, will be studied. Readings will be in Arabic and class discussions will be in English.

ARABIC 602. Modern Arabic Nonfiction
ARABIC 401 or reading knowledge of Arabic. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces the work of major Arab writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Variable in focus according the interests of the class, readings are selected for translation, analysis, and commentary. The course explores the historical progression in the development of political and societal theories in modern times in the Arab world.

ARABIC 604. Modern Arabic Poetry
ARABIC 402; fluency in Arabic at the advanced level. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course is meant to introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading--and discussing--a poem in the original language. We will closely read and analyze selected poems written throughout the century, representing different schools and trends.

ARABIC 606. Arabic Phonology and Morphology
AAPTIS 202 or 205, completed with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the phonetics, phonological, and morphophonological features of literary and dialectal Arabic.

ARABIC 607. Arabic Syntax and Semantics
AAPTIS 202 or 205, completed with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course examines generative syntactic theory, especially the notion of principles and parameters. It also addresses functional, cognitive, and lexical semantic approaches and the relevance of analysis to Modern Standard Arabic and at least one Arabic dialect, using as a reference point medieval Arabic grammar.

ARABIC 608. Arabic Historical Linguistics and Dialectology
AAPTIS 202 or 205, completed with a minimum grade of C or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the development of the Arabic language from its origins to the present. The structure and development of Old, Middle, and Modern Arabic and their affinities to other indigenous dialects and languages are outlined. The historical implications of the development of communal dialects, sociolinguistic variation, and inherent linguistic variability are treated.

ARABIC 609. Arabic Second Language Acquisition
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines: (1) how Arabic as a second/foreign language is learned, (2) what factors contribute to different learning outcomes and variability, and (3) how second language learners of Arabic with different native language backgrounds can attain superior or near native competence. Research findings on Arabic and other languages are explored not only from the perspective of the researcher, but also from that of the teacher. Hence, the course helps students in developing skills to interpret research findings as well as using relevant findings to inform teaching.

ARABIC 610. Topics in Arabic Language
A minimum of two terms of 500-level Arabic coursework. Students cannot elect the same topic twice. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with advanced Arabic language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, film, history, etc. All material will be in Arabic, and the class will be taught in Arabic.

ARABIC 611. Graduate Seminar in Arabic Language
Advanced Arabic proficiency. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This seminar will discuss concepts, theories, or practices relevant to the study, teaching, or use of Arabic language. The instruction and all materials will be in Arabic. Topics will vary.

ARABIC 612. Arabic Teaching Methodology
Permission of instructor and advanced knowledge of Arabic. Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

ARABIC 613. Arabic Curriculum Development
(2). May not be repeated for credit.

The main purpose of this course is to provide students and Arabic instructors with training in curriculum development. The course starts with a review of the various approaches to foreign language curriculum design, followed by careful study and analysis of the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines and ACTFL National Standards of Foreign Language Learning. The participants will be guided through examination of successful models of curriculum samples to design curriculum materials covering the four language skills for all levels of Arabic instruction. The course features hands-on work with material development in small groups under the direction of the course instructor.

Armenian Studies (ARMENIAN)
ARMENIAN 410. Topics in Armenian Language
At least two years of coursework in Armenian or permission of instructor. (3). May be elected three times for credit.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with advanced Armenian language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, religion, film, history, etc. All material will be in Armenian, and the class will be taught in Armenian.

ARMENIAN 499. Independent Study in Armenian
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent study course in the area of Armenian language. The intended language of instruction is Armenian.

ARMENIAN 501. Western Armenian I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the Western Armenian Language with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture will be employed.

ARMENIAN 502. Western Armenian II
ARMENIAN 501. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the Western Armenian Language with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture will be employed.

ARMENIAN 505. Eastern Armenian I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the Eastern Armenian Language with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture will be employed.

ARMENIAN 506. Eastern Armenian II
ARMENIAN 505. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the Eastern Armenian Language with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking. A balanced approach giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture will be employed.

ARMENIAN 601. Intermediate Western Armenian I
ARMENIAN 502. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Continuation of Western Armenian II. Reading, composition and conversation. A balanced approach, giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian Culture.

ARMENIAN 602. Intermediate Western Armenian II
ARMENIAN 601. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Continuation of Intermediate Western Armenian I. Reading, composition and conversation. A balanced approach, giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture.

ARMENIAN 605. Intermediate Eastern Armenian I
ARMENIAN 506. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Continuation of Eastern Armenian II. Reading, composition and conversation. A balanced approach, giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture.

ARMENIAN 606. Intermediate Eastern Armenian II
ARMENIAN 605. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Continuation of Eastern Armenian I. Reading, composition and conversation. A balanced approach, giving equal emphasis to the development of language skills and the study of Armenian culture.

Hebrew Studies (HEBREW)
HEBREW 404. Ethnicity in Israeli Literature and Culture
HEBREW 302 (HJCS 302). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on Israeli literature, film, and music created by Jewish immigrants from the Middle East and North Africa. We consider how the categories of ethnicity, class, and gender have been constructed in Israel and ask why the Mizrahi/Ashkenazi divide continues to be so central to Israeli culture, society, and politics.

HEBREW 409. Readings in Modern Hebrew
Consent of instructor required. Intermediate level proficiency or higher in modern Hebrew. (1 - 2). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is intended for Hebrew language students who wish to take an independent study that requires them to read texts in modern Hebrew.

HEBREW 410. Topics in Modern Hebrew Language
Completion of at least HEBREW 301 or advanced Hebrew proficiency. (3). May be elected three times for credit.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with advanced Hebrew language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, religion, film, history, etc. All material will be in Hebrew, and the class will be taught in Hebrew.

HEBREW 499. Independent Study in Hebrew
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent study course in the area of Hebrew language. The intended language of instruction is modern Hebrew.

Near East Studies (NEAREAST)
NEAREAST 413 / HISTORY 428. The Rise of Islam
Junior standing or permission of instructor. Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The Near East and eastern Mediterranean world in late antiquity; Muhammad and the formation of Islam; the early Islamic empire at its heights.

NEAREAST 414. Nationalities in the Ottoman Empire: The Rise and Demise of the Western Armenians
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course outlines the gradual coalescence of the Western Armenians into a loosely united national entity, from their beginnings in Cilicia to their destruction in the Ottoman Empire in WW I. It highlights the historical, religious, literary, linguistic, social and cultural aspects of Western Armenian realities in the past millennium.

NEAREAST 415. The Literature of the Turks
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The objective of the course is to provide an introduction to the literary activities of the Turkic peoples from their origins in Central Asia around 600 AD to the Turkish contribution to world literature today. Taught in English with English translations of prose and poetry.

NEAREAST 416. The Sultan and His Subjects: Society and Culture in the Ottoman Empire
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the Turko-Islamic elite and popular culture of the Ottoman Empire. The course approaches its subject within the broader context of Islamic culture on the one hand, and the specific geographical and social conditions of the Ottoman world on the other.

NEAREAST 419 / HISTORY 537. The Near East in the Period of the Crusades, 945-1258
Junior standing. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This class focuses on four topics in particular: the historical, economic and ideological factors that motivated both Crusaders and Jihadists; the intricate history of competition and cooperation in the Christian and Muslim settlements in the Holy Land during the era of the Crusades; the cultural exchange that occurred during the Crusades - in particular, new cultural practices that Crusaders took back from the eastern Mediterranean to Europe; and the afterlife of the Crusades in the modern European and Arab imagination.

NEAREAST 421 / RELIGION 465. Islamic Mysticism: Sufism in Time and Space
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Beginning with the Qur'anic origins of Islamic mysticism and its early Christian and ascetic influences, this course will explore the central themes and institutional forms of Sufism, a stream of Islam which stresses the esoteric (mystical) dimensions of religious faith. It will reflect upon the inward quest and devotions of Muslim mystics as these have been lived and expressed in art, theology, literature, and fellowship since the 8th century CE.

NEAREAST 422 / RELIGION 467. Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course will survey the history of diverse Alid movements from the assassination of Ali (d.661) to the crystallization of shi'ism into distinct political, legal and theological schools (Twelver, Isma'ili, Zaydi), and ends with the establishment of Twelver Shi'ism as an imperial religion in Safvi Iran (1501-1722). Emphasis on the debate over authority.

NEAREAST 423. Islamic Law
NEAREAST 216. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will introduce students to classical Islamic legal theory and some applications of positive law in the Sunni tradition. This will include an examination of such key issues as ijtihad versus taqlid, the madhhab (or school of law), the legal responsum (fatwa), legal eclecticism, and the issue of legal change, stasis and borrowing.

NEAREAST 424 / RELIGION 461. Islamic Intellectual History
Taught in English. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A comparative study of Islamic Sufism, theosophy, philosophy, and dialectical theology, focusing on how these diverse fields - varying in methodology and purpose - have conceived of God and the relationship between him and the created world, especially the world of human beings.

NEAREAST 426. An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will outline a history of Armenian Literature from the 16th to the 20th centuries, concentrating on the works of major authors who flourished within and without Armenia. Both the traditional and new literature will be analyzed, but a greater emphasis will be placed on the 19th-20th centuries, including Eastern and Western Armenian literatures, literature of the post-Genocide dispersion, and that of Soviet Armenia.

NEAREAST 429. Topics in Modern Arabic Literature in Translation
(3). May be elected three times for credit.

Topics for this course will vary. The class is conducted in English with all readings in English.

NEAREAST 430. History of Arabic Literature in English
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the literary history of Arabic, from the earliest to modern times. Works in English translation will exemplify this literature which is drawn from poetry and prose. Lectures and class discussion will relate these writings to the societies, historical circumstances, and cultural values to which they give expression.

NEAREAST 432 / HISTORY 429 / RELIGION 496 / WOMENSTD 471. Gender and Sexuality in Pre-Modern Islam
Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Muslim understanding of gender and gender relations, first through a study of those sacred texts (Qur'an and Hadith) that came to define the ideal woman and man, as well as their roles and relationships. Then, gender participation in the political and cultural life of the Safavi, Ottoman and Mughal Courts shall be explored to view the interplay between theory and practice.

NEAREAST 433 / WOMENSTD 496. Gender and Representation in the Modern Middle East
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An examination of the construction of gender as pertains to the contemporary Middle East (predominately but not exclusively the Arab Middle East) as found in a wide array of literary and cultural representations (fiction, travel accounts, photographs, painting, film) produced both in the Middle East and outside of it.

NEAREAST 437 / CLCIV 483 / RELIGION 488. Christianity and Hellenistic Civilizations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar course covers a number of topics exploring the relationship between Christianity as a religious tradition in antiquity and the cultural and social traditions of the ancient Mediterranean.

NEAREAST 438. Exhibiting Ancient Egypt: Past Culture in the Modern Museum
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar explores how ancient Egypt is displayed, interpreted and constructed in the context of museums. The course covers a historic overview of ancient Egyptian artifacts in museums, and examines issues surrounding museum display and interpretation of Egyptian material, and how contemporary understandings of ancient Egypt are shaped by museums.

NEAREAST 440 / AAS 474. The Archaeology of Nubia
NEAREAST 243 (ACABS 281), NEAREAST 338 (ACABS 382), AAS 200, or ANTHRARC 282. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course presents the archaeology and history of one of Africa's earliest civilizations, Nubia, which is located along the Nile in what is today southern Egypt and northern Sudan. It summarizes developments in Nubian history from the expansion of the Sahara desert and the first human settlement in the Nile Valley and concluding with the fall of Meroe in about AD 300. Topics include rise of states and empires, colonialism, identities, international trade, and the relationship of climate change to social development. The course concludes with discussions of modern politics of cultural heritage and museums in the Middle East and Africa.

NEAREAST 441 / WOMENSTD 487. Gender and Society in Ancient Egypt
Some familiarity with Egypt is helpful. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Using ancient texts in translation, secondary readings and artifacts in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, students in this course will examine the definitions of gender, gender roles and relations and the impact of status, religion, sexuality and ethnicity on ancient Egyptian understandings of gender.

NEAREAST 455 / JUDAIC 478 / RELIGION 478. Modern Jewish Thought
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of selected 20th-century Jewish thinkers and their responses to the crisis of modernity (and post-modernity): the breakdown of traditional Jewish culture and its system of meaning; the encounter with, and assimilation of, Western culture; the impact of the traumas of World War I and the Holocaust; and the contemporary quest for intimacy and tikkun, or "healing."

NEAREAST 456 / JUDAIC 468 / RELIGION 469. Jewish Mysticism
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. While the course will survey mystical traditions from the early rabbinic period through the modern, the focus will be on the variegated medieval stream known as kabbalah.

NEAREAST 476 / JUDAIC 467 / RELIGION 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics within history of modern Judaism such as reform and tradition in modern Judaism, theological responses to the Holocaust, modern Jewish philosophy. Topics will change.

NEAREAST 483 / MENAS 493. Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
(1). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This 1-credit course, jointly offered by CMENAS and the Near Eastern Studies, brings together a diverse cohort of specialists covering 5000 years of history, languages, and culture, and a geographical area stretching from the Atlantic to Central Asia. Through a series of lectures by UM faculty and outside speakers, addressing a particular theme chose for that semester, students consider multiple perspectives of comparative research across the ages and cultures.

NEAREAST 487 / HISTORY 443. Modern Middle East History
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Impact of the West on the Islamic Near East in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is on the modernization of the Ottoman Empire and Republican Turkey and Egypt, the rise of the Arab and Zionist nationalisms and the subsequent Arab-Israeli dispute, and inter-Arab and international rivalries to the present.

NEAREAST 490. Topics in Near Eastern Studies
(3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in the field of Near Eastern Studies. The course will be taught by a temporary faculty member or as a testing course for permanent faculty. Topics will vary, focusing on such areas as film, literature, history, popular culture, religion, etc.

NEAREAST 492. Mini-course in Near Eastern Studies
At least one prior course in Near Eastern studies and/or related to the topic of the course. (1 - 3). May be elected twice for credit.

Special topics in Near Eastern studies offered in a mini-course format. Topics will vary but typically center around such disciplines as literature, linguistics, history, religion, visual culture, or cultural studies.

NEAREAST 499. Independent Study in Near Eastern Studies
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent study course in the area of Near Eastern Studies. The intended language of instruction is English. Approval from the department is required.

NEAREAST 517. Classical Persian Texts
PERSIAN 202. (3). May be elected four times for credit.

A survey of classical Persian prose and poetry. A variety of authors and textual histories are explored.

NEAREAST 518. Persianate History Through Political and Cultural Texts
PERSIAN 202 or advanced reading knowledge of Persian. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Persian history is explored through literature, looking at poetry and prose that spans several centuries and political movements.

NEAREAST 520. Readings in Classical Islamic Texts
ARABIC 402. (3). May be elected four times for credit.

Selected theological, philosophical, historical, and geographical texts.

NEAREAST 535. Selected Topics in Ancient Egyptian History and Culture
NEAREAST 243 or 338. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course is an in-depth seminar on the pivotal Middle Kingdom (ca. 2040-1650 BCE) in ancient Egypt which investigates the period from a diachronic and critical historical perspective through a combination of textual and archaeological date. We will also contextualize the complex political, social and religious trends of the Middle Kingdom Egypt within the larger and interrelated systems of cultures in Africa, The Aegean and southwest Asia.

NEAREAST 542. Reading the Rabbis
Second year proficiency in Hebrew (HJCS 202). (4). May not be repeated for credit.

The class will study rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory in rabbinic literature.

NEAREAST 576 / JUDAIC 505. What is Judaism?
Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 205/HJCS 276.

An interdisciplinary, introductory survey of Jewish civilization and culture from Biblical times to the present in many countries. Jewish culture and civilization, among the oldest extant, have been enriched by their development in different cultural contexts. The course includes history, rabbinics, Jewish Thought, Hebrew and Yiddish literatures, sociology, political science.

NEAREAST 590. Topics in Near Eastern Studies
Upper-level undergraduates or graduate students with previous coursework in Near Eastern studies. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course is for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in the field of Near Eastern Studies taught by a temporary faculty or as a testing course for permanent faculty. Topics will vary.

NEAREAST 591. Seminar in Near Eastern Studies: Religion
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This seminar is designed to discuss theories, methods, histories, or current trends in the field of religious studies as they pertain to Near Eastern studies. Topics will vary.

NEAREAST 592. Seminar in Near Eastern Studies: Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar is designed to discuss theories, methods, histories, or current trends in the field of literary studies as they pertain to Near Eastern studies. Topics will vary.

NEAREAST 593. Seminar in Near Eastern Studies: Linguistics
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar is designed to discuss theories, methods, histories, or current trends in the field of linguistics as they pertain to Near Eastern studies. Topics will vary.

NEAREAST 594. Seminar in Near Eastern Studies: Theory and Methodology
NEAREAST 698. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This seminar is designed to address theories and methodologies relevant to the field of Near Eastern Studies. The intended audience is more advanced graduate students with some prior foundation in historical methods and theories. Topics will vary.

NEAREAST 595. Seminar in Near Eastern Studies: History and Culture
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This seminar is designed to address theories, methodologies, or societal trends in the field of history or cultural studies as they pertain to Near Eastern studies. Topics will vary.

NEAREAST 683 / POLSCI 653. Proseminar in Middle East Politics
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

NEAREAST 685 / HISTORY 793 / MENAS 695. Seminar: The Study of the Near East
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

NEAREAST 698. Historical Research Methods
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This class is designed to engage in graduate students in the field of Near Eastern Studies with a variety of approaches to study the past. It will provide a forum to collectively discuss modes of historical questioning as well as responsible conduct of research and scholarship.

NEAREAST 699. Directed Graduate Readings
Consent of department required. Graduate standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

NEAREAST 990. Dissertation Research and Writing Precandidate
Consent of department required. Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 9). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 27 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

NEAREAST 995. Dissertation Research and Writing Candidate
Candidate only. Consent of department required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Near East Studies Languages (NESLANG)
NESLANG 410. Topics in Near Eastern Language
Students should not enroll in the same topic twice. (3). May be elected four times for credit.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students who wish to pursue proficiency in a Near Eastern language not regularly taught by the department. Topics will vary, but will focus on introducing the basic grammar, vocabulary, and writing systems of a Near Eastern language.

NESLANG 415. Elementary Hittite
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the earliest-attested Indo-European language. Presentation of the fundamentals of Hittite grammar and orientation to the cuneiform writing system. Consideration of the position of Hittite among the languages of Europe and the Near East.

NESLANG 420. Introduction to Akkadian
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Akkadian, an east Semitic language (part of the greater Afroasiatic language family) that was spoken in ancient Mesopotamia.

NESLANG 430. Introduction to Middle Egyptian I
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the grammar and literature of ancient Egypt, and to the hieroglyphic script.

NESLANG 435. Introduction to Sumerian
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to Sumerian, a language of ancient Sumer, which was spoken in southern Mesopotamia (modern Iraq).

NESLANG 440. Coptic I
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Coptic, a northern Afro-Asiatic language spoken in Egypt until at least the 17th century.

NESLANG 441. Coptic II
NESLANG 440 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

NESLANG 450. Introductory Central Asian Language I
(4 - 5). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read, and write at a basic level in the Central Asian language of their choice. Repeatable for different languages.

NESLANG 451. Introductory Central Asian Language II
NESLANG 450 (or AAPTIS 119 or ASIANLAN 119), with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4 - 5). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. May not repeat the same language at the same level.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read, and write at a basic level in the Central Asian language of their choice.

NESLANG 460. Introduction to Demotic Egyptian
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to Demotic, the indigenous language/script used in ancient Egypt from around 650 BCE to 450 CE for documentary, monumental, literary, religious and magical texts. No prior knowledge of Egyptian is assumed. We learn Demotic working through a Demotic literary text, the Instructions of Onchsheshonqy.

NESLANG 470 / GREEK 473. Advanced Koine
Two years of Greek, one term of New Testament Greek (300 level or equivalent). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Interpretation of selected New Testament texts with attention to philological, historical, and theological problems. This course also provides an introduction to questions of the textual transmission of New Testament writings.

NESLANG 480. Intermediate Central Asian Language I
NESLANG 450 (or AAPTIS 120 or ASIANLAN 120), with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3 - 5). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Students may not repeat the same language at the same level.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read, and write at an intermediate level in the Central Asian language of their choice.

NESLANG 499. Independent Study in Near Eastern Language
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent study course taught in one of the languages under the NESLANG subject code of the Department of Near Eastern Studies. Approval from the department is required.

NESLANG 501. Elementary Classical Hebrew I
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the language and style of the Hebrew Bible and other ancient texts written in Hebrew. Regular instruction on grammar and vocabulary with drills.

NESLANG 502. Elementary Classical Hebrew II
NESLANG 501. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Lessons and exercises on the language of the Hebrew Bible and other ancient texts written in Hebrew. Presentation of grammar and vocabulary.

NESLANG 513. Readings in Akkadian
NESLANG 420. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Readings in Akkadian meant for advanced students in the language.

NESLANG 514. Akkadian Literary Texts
NESLANG 513 (ACABS 412). (3). May be elected nine times for a maximum of 12 credits.

Reading in cuneiform of economic texts and administrative documents from various sites of the Old Babylonian period. The course will also serve as an introduction to the variety of archives and scribal traditions of this period.

NESLANG 515. Akkadian Documents
NESLANG 513 (ACABS 412). (3). May be elected four times for credit.

Readings of Akkadian legal, administrative, and economic documents.

NESLANG 601. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I
NESLANG 502. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

NESLANG 602. Intermediate Classical Hebrew II
NESLANG 601. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Persian (PERSIAN)
PERSIAN 404. Modern Persian Poetry
At least two years of Persian or its equivalent are required to enroll. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This upper-level course introduces students to the aesthetically rich and politically charged world of modern Persian poetry.

PERSIAN 410. Topics in Persian Language
Advanced proficiency in Persian or permission of instructor. (3). May be elected three times for credit.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with advanced Persian language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, religion, film, history, etc. All material will be in Persian, and the class will be taught in Persian.

PERSIAN 499. Independent Study in Persian
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent study course in the area of Persian language. The intended language of instruction is Persian. Approval from the department is required.

PERSIAN 504. Modern Persian Fiction
PERSIAN 202 (AAPTIS 242). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of modern Persian fiction. This course introduces students to great works and notable authors. All texts are in Persian.

PERSIAN 505. Modern Persian Nonfiction
PERSIAN 202 (AAPTIS 242). Taught in Persian. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of modern Persian non-fiction. This course introduces students to great works and notable authors. All texts are in Persian.

Turkish Studies (TURKISH)
TURKISH 410. Topics in Turkish Language
Advanced Turkish proficiency or permission of instructor. (3). May be elected three times for credit.

This course is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students with advanced Turkish language proficiency. Topics will vary, focusing on aspects of culture, linguistics, literature, music, religion, film, history, etc. All material will be in Turkish, and the class will be taught in Turkish.

TURKISH 499. Independent Study in Turkish
Consent of department required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent study course in the area of Turkish language. The intended language of instruction is Turkish. Approval from the department is required.

TURKISH 504. Modern Turkish Readings
TURKISH 202 (AAPTIS 252) or TURKISH 203 (AAPTIS 255). (3). May be elected three times for credit.

Intensive linguistic practice in modern Turkish with thorough literary, historical, and philological analysis.

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