Graduate Course Catalog
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Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
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Courses in LSA Slavic Languages & Literatures
Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian (BCS)
BCS 436. Modern Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature
(3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for extensive reading of Bosnian, Croatian and/or Serbian written work at an advanced level. The subject matter covered is dependent upon preparation and interest of the individual student. Texts range from belles-lettres (short stories, novels) to journalism and history.

BCS 437. Yugoslav Literature of Exile: Nowhere People-Exiles from the State of Ideology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course explores cosmopolitan homelessness, ideology, memory and nostalgia in the context of the nationalist crisis and crippling wars in what used to be Yugoslavia. It covers the period from the Communist 1950s to the current moment of global migrations and exclusionist politics of identity.

BCS 439. Directed Reading of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Intensive reading of selected works of nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

BCS 531. First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

The major objective of this course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian. Students are simultaneously introduced to both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets, with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking including drill in the language laboratory.

BCS 532. First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II
BCS 131 or 531. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Continuation of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian 531. Presentation of basic grammatical information, with exercise in reading, writing, and speaking.

BCS 533. Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
BCS 132 or 532. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Emphasis is placed first on reading Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian literature and secondly on developing increased competency in speaking and writing. Extensive use of audio and video materials.

BCS 534. Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II
BCS 231 or 533. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Czech (CZECH)
CZECH 480. Supervised Czech Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit.

CZECH 484. Modern Czech Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The survey will cover basic literature of the 19th and 20th centuries; the more recent literary production, however, will be stressed. Reading knowledge of Czech is recommended but not required.

CZECH 541. First Year Czech I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This is an introductory course to Czech language and culture. Students are introduced to Czech sounds and alphabet, pronunciation and spelling, to basic grammatical structure of nouns, verbs and modifier. Course focuses on active language use through oral and conversational drills - students also practice greetings and social phrases using reading and writing skills. Course provides basic facts of geography of the Czech Republic. Daily preparation is essential.

CZECH 542. First-Year Czech II
CZECH 141 or 541. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Students will continue studying basics of Czech grammar that will be covered according to their sequence in Communicative Czech textbook and practice listening, reading, speaking and writing skills still focusing on practical vocabulary for everyday situation (giving directions, expressing wishes, discussing study issues, shopping, food, restaurant, family, traveling, weather, etc.). Students are encouraged to use Czech language skills in one-to-one and small group communicative activities.

CZECH 543. Second-Year Czech I
CZECH 142 or 542. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Students continue their studies with deeper understanding and more profound usage of grammatical structures of Czech language such as declension of nouns of foreign origin, irregular comparatives of adjectives and adverbs, conditional. Course introduces features of Spoken Czech. Students study more specific vocabulary of the topics such as lifestyle, plans for the future, history, music and art, etc., and they should be able to express congratulations, make and respond to invitations, express counterproposals. Czech mass media and Video materials are widely used.

CZECH 544. Second-Year Czech II
CZECH 241 or 543. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Further development of grammatical structures includes acquiring the complex use of verbs (participles, reflexive passive forms), of adverbs, conjunctions, and interjections and comprises and study of complex sentences (time, conditional, of concession). Stylistic structures are studied. All grammatical material is presented in authentic cultural context with regular use of contemporary Czech mass media, Czech music, film and literature. Course is based on extensive reading the subsequent discussions. The course further enhances Czech vocabulary (CV health, body, leisure activities) and idiom.

CZECH 545. Third-Year Czech I
CZECH 242 or 544. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course builds knowledge of Czech acquired during the first and second years. Equal emphasis will be laid on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills.

CZECH 546. Third-Year Czech II
CZECH 341 or 545. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

The course builds on the knowledge of Czech acquired during the first and second years. Equal emphasis will be laid on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills.

Polish (POLISH)
POLISH 421. Fourth-Year Polish I
POLISH 322. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims at developing both reading and spelling fluency by building idiomatic skills and studying culture as reflected in linguistic patterns and grammatical structures. Readings of specialized texts selected according to student's academic and professional interests.

POLISH 422. Fourth-Year Polish II
POLISH 421. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims at developing both reading and spelling fluency by building idiomatic skills and studying culture as reflected in linguistic patterns and grammatical structures. Readings of specialized texts selected according to student's academic and professional interests.

POLISH 450. Directed Polish Reading
Consent of instructor required. POLISH 325 and/or 326 and reading knowledge of Polish. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Extensive reading of Polish texts in various fields. All reading done in the Polish original.

POLISH 525. Polish Literature from the Middle Ages to 1890
(3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in POLISH 325.

This course will trace the dramatic political and historical transformations of Poland through its contributions to European literature. Drawing on concurrent developments in the visual arts, politics, and the sciences, we will consider a range of texts ranging from the Middle Ages to the dawn of the 20th century.

POLISH 526. Polish Literature: 1890 to Present
Some reading knowledge of Polish. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in POLISH 326.

This course provides a survery of the important literary works that track Poland's transformations. We will examine a range of interpretive methodologies, drawing on cultural/historical criticism, and philosophy, using Polish literature as test subjects for the close development of critical perspectives. Authors will include Milosz, Szymborska, Gombrowicz, Maslowska.

POLISH 561. First-Year Polish I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Introductory course presenting basic grammatical information and vocabulary. Course is geared toward active language used through oral drills and conversational practice. Conversations are discussions include a cultural component to familiarize students with both Polish language and culture.

POLISH 562. First-Year Polish II
POLISH 121 or 561. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

A First-Year Polish aims at establishing reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. The primary focus is explaining grammar, reading, building vocabulary, and engaging in guided conversation. In addition to learning and language, students are introduced to Polish literature and culture through translation, music, and video presentations.

POLISH 563. Second-Year Polish I
POLISH 122 or 562. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

The focus of the course is to develop practical communication skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Grammatical material is presented in authentic cultural context, with regular use of contemporary Polish film, literature, mass media and music.

POLISH 564. Second-Year Polish II
POLISH 221 or 563. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

A continuation of Polish 221/563. Students will focus on developing their ability to apply all language skills effectively in a variety of settings. Numerous reading, listening, viewing, and speaking exercises will provide opportunities to practice comprehension and communication. Contemporary music, literature, visual arts, film, etc., will be used to provide a context in which the study of Polish language will be both enjoyable and meaningful.

POLISH 565. Third-Year Polish I
POLISH 222 or 564. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

The course builds on the knowledge of Polish acquired during the first and second years. Equal emphasis will be laid on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Considerable attention will be given to special points of grammar and syntax.

POLISH 566. Third-Year Polish II
POLISH 321 or 565. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

The course builds on the knowledge of Polish acquired during the first and second years. Equal emphasis will be laid on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Considerable attention will be given to special points of grammar and syntax.

POLISH 567. Fourth-Year Polish I
POLISH 322 or 566. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims at developing both reading and spelling fluency by building idiomatic skills and studying culture as reflected in linguistic patterns and grammatical structures. Readings of specialized texts selected according to student's academic and professional interests.

POLISH 568. Fourth-Year Polish II
POLISH 421 or 567. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

A continuation of Polish 421-567. This course aims at developing both reading and spelling fluency by building idiomatic skills and studying culture as reflected in linguistic patterns and grammatical structures. Readings of specialized texts selected according to student's academic and professional interests.

POLISH 621. Directed Reading of Polish Literature
Consent of instructor required. Two years of Polish language or the equivalent. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

POLISH 622. Directed Reading in Polish
Consent of instructor required. Two years of Polish. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Russian (RUSSIAN)
RUSSIAN 401. Fourth-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 302 or 303. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403 or 517. F.

RUSSIAN 401/RUSSIAN 402 are designed to provide an active mastery of the more difficult facets of Russian grammar, especially the verbal system. Assignments include Russian short stories, compositions, and oral reports.

RUSSIAN 402. Fourth-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 401. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403 or 518. W.

RUSSIAN 401/RUSSIAN 402 are designed to provide an active mastery of the more difficult facets of Russian grammar, especially the verbal system. Assignments include Russian short stories, compositions, and oral reports.

RUSSIAN 435 / HISTORY 435 / JUDAIC 435. Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and the Arts
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Course surveys major trends of cultural development of Jews in Russia from late 18th to early 21st centuries, focusing on literary and artistic creativity in Russian cultural context. Special attention is given to two major centers in Odessa and St. Petersburg treated as two different models of Jewish cultural life.

RUSSIAN 461. Pushkin
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture course provides an overview of the greatest Russian writer's poetry, drama, and prose as a structural unity. Undergraduates may do all of their reading in translation. Knowledge of Russian not required.

RUSSIAN 462. Dostoevsky
(3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. Russian concentrators are expected to read Russian texts.

RUSSIAN 463. Chekhov
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. All readings may be done in English. Russian concentrators are expected to read Russian texts.

RUSSIAN 464. Tolstoy
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Russian literature and culture is necessary. Russian concentrators are expected to read Russian texts.

RUSSIAN 469. 20th-Century Authors
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in English.

A detailed examination of the careers and works of one or two major authors of the twentieth century.

RUSSIAN 471. Modern Russian Poetry
A knowledge of Russian is required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 474. Late 20th-Century Russian Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A survey of Russian literature in the last decades of the twentieth century.

RUSSIAN 477. Russian Culture and National Ideology
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the development of national ideology in 19th century Russia as a central problem of Russian culture of this period. Official nationalism as well as popular national ideology will be discussed in their metaphoric representation, as will their deep connection with Russian literature, which provided society with some of its most popular cultural myths.

RUSSIAN 479. Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years
Knowledge of Russian is not a prerequisite (all readings in English). (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A survey of Nabokov's English novels, short stories, plays, and poetry, considered in the context of world literature with special attention to cross-cultural poetics of literary multilingualism.

RUSSIAN 499. Advanced Seminar in Russian
RUSSIAN 302 or 303, and 351. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in Russian.

This seminar serves as the capstone course for the concentration in Russian, but the course is open to other qualified undergraduates and to graduate students. Topics on Russian literature and/or culture vary. Readings, discussions, written and oral assignments in Russian.

RUSSIAN 511. First-Year Russian I
(5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 103, or 123, or RCLANG 193.

In this course, students are introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation, reading, writing, and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). The course structure provides a balanced approach, integrating vocabulary and functionally based grammar explanations. The course is supplemented by video shows and cultural materials.

RUSSIAN 512. First-Year Russian II
RUSSIAN 511 (or RUSSIAN 101). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 102, 103, or 123, or RCLANG 193.

In this course, the sequel to Russian 101/501, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian on topics of interest including Russian history and culture.

RUSSIAN 513. Second-Year Russian I
One of: RUSSIAN 512 or RUSSIAN 102 or 103 or RCLANG 193. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201, 203 or 223.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, and verbs of motion. The course emphasizes speaking and listening skills in realistic settings, situations, and cultural context.

RUSSIAN 514. Second-Year Russian II
RUSSIAN 201 or 513. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 202, 203 or 223.

Continuation of Russian 201. This course stresses vocabulary building and continued and development of speaking and listening proficiency in Russian. Active command of Russian grammar is steadily increased. Readings from authentic materials in fiction, non-fiction and poetry.

RUSSIAN 515. Third-Year Russian I
One of the following: RUSSIAN 202 or 203 or RCLANG 293,RUSSIAN 223,RUSSIAN 225,or RUSSIAN 514. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 301, 303 or 325.

Films will be an integral part of the course. The General at home viewing will be followed up by class discussion, film analysis and watching particular scenes in class/or as homework. While the course's main purpose is the development of students' oral proficiency, it also includes texts for reading comprehension and exercises that focus on acquisition of written skills and grammatical accuracy.

RUSSIAN 516. Third-Year Russian II
One of: RUSSIAN 301 or RCLANG 323 or RUSSIAN 515. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 302 303, or 325.

Continuation of Russian 301. During the course students will continue to work on the development of all language skills. Films will be an integral part of this course. The general at home viewing will be followed up by class discussion, film analysis and watching particular scenes in class/or as homework. While the course's main purpose is the development of students' oral proficiency, it also includes texts for reading comprehension and exercises that focus on acquisition of written skills and grammatical accuracy. Students will continue to work on the expansion of both passive and active.

RUSSIAN 517. Fourth-Year Russian I
One of: RUSSIAN 302 or 303 or RCLANG 323, or RUSSIAN 516. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 401.

The goal of fourth-year Russian is to train students in a more sophisticated use of Russian language, utilizing complex forms of communication and self-expression. Students will work on development of all language skills, as well as translational skills. A significant part of this course will be the study of syntax and style, as related to literary texts and contemporary spoken language. This course will be conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSSIAN 518. Fourth-Year Russian II
RUSSIAN 401 or 517. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 402.

The goal of fourth-year Russian is to train students in a more sophisticated use of Russian language, utilizing complex forms of communication and self-expression. Students will work on development of all language skills, as well as translational skills. A significant part of this course will be the study of syntax and style, as related to literary texts and contemporary spoken language. This course will be conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSSIAN 519. Fifth-Year Russian I: Contemporary Issues
RUSSIAN 402 or 518. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May be elected twice for credit.

This advanced language course is designed for students wishing to achieve high-level proficiency in spoken and written Russian. Drawing in diverse instructional materials about socio-cultural, political, and/or economic issues in contemporary Russian, this course is accessible to students in range of disciplinary and professional degree programs.

RUSSIAN 520. Fifth-Year Russian: Contemporary Issues
RUSSIAN 501 or 519. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May be elected twice for credit.

Continuation of Russian 501. This advanced language course is designed for students wishing to achieve high-level proficiency in spoken and written Russian. Drawing on diverse instructional materials about sociocultural, political, and/or economic issues in contemporary Russian, this course is accessible to students in range of disciplinary and professional degree programs. Assignments include written and oral reports.

RUSSIAN 523. Intensive First Year Russian
(8). May not be repeated for credit.

Using Nachalo as the primary text, this course is intended to take the beginner to a level of basic fluency in all four language skills. This course covers Russian grammar and syntax, equips the students with a basic yet functional vocabulary, and provides practice in speaking, reading, writing, and listening. The material is supplemented by videos, audio, and internet resources.

RUSSIAN 524. Russian Heritage I
Native or near-native speaker or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Improvement of oral and written language skills of heritage speakers, emphasizing correct and diversified use of language and addressing individual grammatical difficulties. Readings from major authors and screening of film adaptations of Russian literature. Discussion of various cultural topics.

RUSSIAN 525. Intensive Second Year Russian
RUSSIAN 511 and 512, or RUSSIAN 523. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8). May not be repeated for credit.

V Puti is the primary text for this course, which will enable the student to function relatively comfortably in real-life Russian-language situations. This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered in the first-year Russian courses. It greatly emphasizes the development of speaking and listening skills.

RUSSIAN 526. Russian Heritage II
Successful completion of RUSSIAN 524 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed for students who have completed RUSSIAN 524 or heritage speakers who have basic reading and writing skills. It focuses on professional usage of Russian and is aimed towards an advanced level of language proficiency. Students work on improving their skills in creative writing, reading, and grammar. Topics include Russian history, education, relationships in Russian society, business, and Russian media. Students who complete this course successfully may advance to fourth-year Russian and/or courses in literature and area studies.

RUSSIAN 527. Intensive Third Year Russian
RUSSIAN 513 and 514, or RUSSIAN 525. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is the intensive variant of RUSSIAN 515 and 516 that provides a concentrated review of grammar, introductory reading in Russian culture and literature, and regular practice in conversation.

RUSSIAN 552. Russian Literature of the Eighteenth Century
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 558. Central Asia through Russian Eyes: Cultural Appropriation of an Exotic Land
(3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 358. Taught in English.

This course explores key representations of Central Asia in Russian culture from the 19th-21st centuries. It highlights the following topics: how Russia's conquest of Central Asia contributed the Russians' quest for national identity; how their perceptions of the region have evolved; and how they positioned themselves in regard to values associated with Muslim culture. Taught in English.

RUSSIAN 576. Structure of Russian
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 651. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of the chair of department. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 652. Directed Reading in Russian Literature
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of the chair of department. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 852. 19th-Century Literature
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 855. Seminar on Chekhov
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 857. Seminar on Tolstoy
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 862. Seminar in 20th-Century Russian Literature
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 865. Pushkin' Prose and Russian Literary Theory
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The subject of the seminar shall be the role of Pushkin, in particular of his prose, in the development of literary theory in Russia, with special reference to the Formal school and Structuralism, including the research of Eikhenbaum, Jakobson, Lotman, Shklovsky, Tomashevsky, Tynianov, and Vinogradov. Graduate students of the Slavic Department will be expected to read the primary texts, as well as much of the relevant scholarship, in the original Russian, Graduate students from other departments interested in narratology, rhetoric, etc., maybe read whatever is available in translation.

RUSSIAN 867. Seminar on Dostoevsky
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

In this seminar students will explore the life and work of Fedor Dostoevsky, locating him and his oeuvre in the cultural and intellectual history of Russia, while also examining an extensive and representative sample of his prose fiction in detail, and studying the scholarly and critical reception of his works in Russia and abroad.

RUSSIAN 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

RUSSIAN 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Slavic Languages and Literatures (SLAVIC)
SLAVIC 410. Teaching of Slavic Languages
RUSSIAN 302 or 303. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (2). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of the multiple aspects of language teaching, including theoretical background. Topics of discussion include intercultural understanding, drilling, testing, computer-assisted instruction, and multimedia technology. Emphasis on development of practical skills for classroom instruction.

SLAVIC 470. Topics in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Survey and analysis of selected topics in the literature, arts, and related areas of the cultures of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe.

SLAVIC 471. Seminar in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern and Southern Europe
(3). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Seminar covering various topics in cultural studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe. This course that will present cultural theory or specific cultural material (from folklore or popular culture to literature and cinema), with topics and instructors varying from year to year.

SLAVIC 490. Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe
(1). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Survey and analysis of current developments in Eastern European literatures, politics, and culture in light of the changes now taking place.

SLAVIC 500. Teaching of Slavic Languages
Advanced proficiency in Russian and/or another Slavic language is required. Students who do not have advanced proficiency at the start of the course will be required to take in advanced language course concurrently. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of the multiple aspects of language teaching, including theoretical background. Topics of discussion include intercultural understanding, drilling, testing, computer-assisted instruction, and multimedia technology. Emphasis on development of practical skills for classroom instruction.

SLAVIC 549. Proseminar on Research Methods in Slavic Literatures
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

The proseminar course is designed to introduce graduate students to research methodology in Slavic literatures including how to formulate research problems and the basic tools for solving them. It will also introduce students to the current research being conducted by members of the Department's faculty.

SLAVIC 616. RUSLAN Service Learning: Russian Language, Culture and People in the US
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course is oriented towards all learners of Russian language, history and culture who want to apply and improve their newly acquired language skills and area-studies knowledge by directly and personally engaging with the local Russophone community.

SLAVIC 661. Directed Reading in Slavic Linguistics
Consent of instructor required. SLAVIC 483. Graduate standing. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

SLAVIC 662. Directed Reading in Slavic Linguistics
Consent of instructor required. SLAVIC 483; Graduate standing. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

SLAVIC 865. Seminar on East European Literary Theories
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

SLAVIC 871. Seminar in Slavic Literature
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Seminar on topics in Slavic literatures and cultures.

SLAVIC 876. The Avant Gardes
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the historical avant-gardes of Eastern and Western Europe. Futurism, Dadaism, Constructivism, Poetism, and Surrealism will be discussed in detail. Special issues and themes include the role of language, mass media, and technology in the avant-garde; women artists; manifesto as genre; New typography; and conception of the book.

Ukrainian (UKR)
UKR 421. Directed Reading in Ukrainian Literature
Consent of instructor required. Open to non-concentrators. A knowledge of Ukrainian is not required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Readings of works by major Ukrainian authors. Program can deal with either the old or the modern period and includes weekly one-hour discussion meetings and several short papers. Reading can be done in Ukrainian or English.

UKR 450. Internship in Ukraine
Consent of instructor required. UKR 152. (1 in the half-term). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Students will participate in internships involving the extensive use of Ukrainian language. Students will take the initiative to locate and plan the internships under the sponsorship of a faculty member. Some of the internships may be arranged by nonprofit organizations.

UKR 470. Cultures of Ukraine
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Students will learn about the diverse cultural traditions of the second largest country in Europe with more than a 1000-year-old history of colonial heritage. The course will examine major components of Ukraine culture: history, language, literature, religion, science, music, and art. Topics are presented as "cultural mapping" of Ukrainian lands and its people, who were widely influenced by a variety of other cultures, yet never lost their own identity.

UKR 520. An Introduction to Ukrainian Poetry
Basic Ukrainian reading knowledge. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course covers the history of Ukrainian poetry, ranging from neoclassicism to panfuturism, within the context of the development of Ukrainian literature and national identity, with particular emphasis on 20th century high modernism. Poetry will be read in the original Ukrainian. The basic principles of Ukrainian versification and its evolution will be applied in explicating and translating the poetry into English. The course will thus further students' knowledge of the language itself as well as of Ukrainian culture.

UKR 551. First-Year Ukrainian I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Introductory course in Ukrainian language including grammar, extensive drills both oral and written, reading of dialogues and supplementary materials.

UKR 552. First-Year Ukrainian II
UKR 151 or 551. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Further study of basic morphology and syntax, singular and plural of nouns, adjectives and pronouns (the complete case system), verbs of motion, prefixation, numerals. Acquisition of new vocabulary, development of reading, writing, and speaking skills.

UKR 553. Second-Year Ukrainian I
UKR 152 or 552. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course involves reading, speaking, writing, and grammar. Tests and conversational topics are based on Ukrainian culture, history, literature, and poetry. The new addition to this course will include business Ukrainian.

UKR 554. Second-Year Ukrainian II
UKR 251 or 553. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Second-level course designed to provide advanced skills in reading Ukrainian literature as well as in speaking, writing, and listening. Students will be able to understand and respond to a variety of texts and in a range of conversational situations.

UKR 555. Third-Year Ukrainian I
UKR 252 or 554. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course is intended for students who wish to further develop their proficiency in the Ukrainian language through conversation, writing, and reading. Topics for discussion deal with recent political, social, economic, and cultural issues facing today's Ukraine. Reading selections include annotated articles on contemporary issues, materials from the internet, films, and short literary texts based on 20th century Ukrainian literature. The course will also provide a systematic review of Ukrainian grammar. Classes will be conducted largely in Ukrainian.

UKR 556. Third-Year Ukrainian II
UKR 351 or 451 or 555. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course is part two of a two-semester sequence intended for students who wish to further develop their proficiency in the Ukrainian language through conversation, writing, and reading. Topics for discussion deal with recent political, social, economic, and cultural issues facing Ukraine.

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