Graduate Course Catalog
Effective Term
Requirement or Grouping
Listings Per Page
Subject
  or   Department
Show Descriptions Show Course Guide Term Links For Past Two Years
Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
   Page 1 of 1, Results 1 - 43 of 43   
Courses in LSA Afroamerican and African Studies
Afroamerican & African Studies (AAS)
AAS 403. Education and Development in Africa
AAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

AAS 407 / HISTART 406. Looking at African Things
HISTART 208/AAS 208. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the shifting historical terms and narratives that constitute and justify the creation, display and reception of African object, both in and out of Africa, in such contexts as museums, photographic archives, world's fairs, theme parks and other cultural spectacles.

AAS 408. African Economies: Social and Political Settings
AAS 200. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

AAS 409 / ANTHRCUL 408. Maternal/Child Health and Environmental Pollution in Africa
Junior or above. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on the effects of the environment and environmental pollution on the health of women and children in several sub-Saharan African countries. Selected readings in medical anthropological, public health, and environmental pollution as well as films examining connections between health, environmental factors, culture, and development are examined.

AAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (AAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections. (Cross-Area Courses). F, W, Sp, Su.

AAS 421 / HISTORY 421 / LACS 421 / RELIGION 421. Religions of the African Diaspora
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Conceptualizes "diaspora" and introduces Brazilian Candomble, Cuban Santeria and Palo Monte, Haitian Vodou, Jamaican and globalized Rastafari, the ancestor religion of the Garifuna of Central America, and Afro-Indian practices in Trinidad. Studies of historical development as well as contemporary practice will be used.

AAS 422 / ANTHRCUL 411. African Cultures
AAS 200 (CAAS 200); and junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. The course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa.

AAS 426. Urban Redevelopment and Social Justice
(3). May not be repeated for credit. (Cross-Area Courses). F.

AAS 434 / SOC 434. Social Organization of Black Communities
Introduction to SOC or introduction to AAS. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 440 / SAC 440. African Cinema
AAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

A critical and interdisciplinary look at the development of African cinema from its inception in the 1960s, at the height of the sociopolitical upheavals experienced by many nations in the transition from colonialism to independence, to the recent phase of introspection and diversification.

AAS 443 / WOMENSTD 443. Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health
AAS 201, WOMENSTD 240 or 220, AMCULT 240, NURS 220. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore the intersections of health, gender, and race by focusing on the epidemic of HIV and the epidemic of violence in the African American community. Students will explore the theory and practice surrounding an intervention module on HIV prevention and violence.

AAS 444 / ANTHRCUL 414. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
Junior standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (Afro-Caribbean Studies). F.

A survey of the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean with emphasis on Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Guyana. Analysis of class, race relations, cultural pluralism, ethnicity, population movements, and economic development.

AAS 450. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, I
(3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). F.

AAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II
AAS 450. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies). W.

This course is a continuation of Law, Race and the Historical Process I (AAS 450). It covers the period of time from the beginnings of the modern Civil Rights movement to the present.

AAS 454 / ANTHRCUL 453. African-American Culture
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

AAS 459 / ANTHRCUL 451. African-American Religion
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 462. Globalization and African Health
AAS 200 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The course will investigate the two-way relationship between globalization and African health. Topics include: globalization and informalization; urbanization and health; the influence of international property rights and access to pharmaceuticals; the impact of international trade on African incomes; the relationship between international debt, World Bank and IMF conditionally and the health of Africans; the impact of FDI on African livelihoods; the influence of commodity chains and global industries on Africa's standard of living; how the shifting global climate has affected rainfall patterns; agricultural production and the incidence of malnutrition and famine; and the relationship between the health of Africans and new global diseases.

AAS 463. The Black Middle Class in America
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course provides a broad overview of the emergence, growth, and stability of the black middle class. It is concerned with much-debated issues such as: (1) the criteria used to determine membership in the category of middle class; (2) how class position shapes opportunity; (3) whether there is a viable black middle class culture; and (4) how members of the black middle class assess their experience.

AAS 468. Practicum in Field Studies in the Diaspora
AAS 111 or permission of instructor. May require concurrent registration in AAS 469, Issues in the Diaspora. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Exposing students to the culture and politics of regions in the African Diaspora through experiential educational methodologies. This course provides instruction and practical experience in public health, architecture, ethnomusicology, and/or other disciplines under the supervision of a faculty member. Includes completion of journals or field notes, projects and presentations as required by instructor.

AAS 469. Issues in Field Studies in the Diaspora
AAS 111 or permission of instructor. May require concurrent registration in AAS 468, Field Studies in the Diaspora. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Exposes students to the culture and politics of regions in the African diaspora through on-side seminars and lectures by scholars and other professionals from the host country. Readings and on-side papers address the methodological, theoretical and historical foundations of field work, and deepen student's understanding of "race" across the diaspora.

AAS 471. Higher Education and African-American Social Development
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an empirically informed overview and analytical engagement of the various factors central to understanding the role higher education has played in the social development of the African-American population in the United States. Historically most African Americans have understood that access to higher education (i.e., colleges and universities) can have a fundamental impact on their future life opportunities within the American social structure.

AAS 473 / HISTORY 473 / LACS 483. Brazil: History and Culture
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the history of Brazil, focusing on literature and performance as expressions of the national or regional cultural identities, with particular attention to racial categories and African heritage. Topics include: indigenous societies and responses to European invasion; slavery and paternalism; religious expression; and the ways that racial and ethnic identification has inspired much of Brazil's unique cultural production. When possible, we will include various ways of learning about cultural expression, incorporating interdisciplinary sources such as fiction, archival documents, testimony, ethnography, recorded music, and dance/movement.

AAS 474 / ACABS 474. The Archaeology of Nubia
ACABS 281, ACABS 382, AAS 200, or ANTHRARC 282. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course presents the archaeology and history of one of Africa's earliest civilizations, Nubia, which is located along the Nile in what is today southern Egypt and northern Sudan. It summarizes developments in Nubian history from the expansion of the Sahara desert and the first human settlement in the Nile Valley and concluding with the fall of Meroe in about AD 300. Topics include rise of states and empires, colonialism, identities, international trade, and the relationship of climate change to social development. The course concludes with discussions of modern politics of cultural heritage and museums in the Middle East and Africa.

AAS 480 / HISTART 408. Visual Culture as History in Africa
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Employing the analytical and interpretive methods of art history, archaeology, and history, this course examines artifacts and architecture from a number of African societies as historical "documents" of the past, and also as agents of social, political, religious, and economic processes that were used to shape the histories of these societies.

AAS 487. Communication Media in the Black World: Electronic Media
AAS 201. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. (African-American Studies).

AAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies
(1 - 2). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

The mini-course is part of a series that explores race.

AAS 510. Supervised Research
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 6). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term’s elections.

AAS 519 / POLSCI 619. African Americans and the Politics of Race
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

AAS 525. Elementary African Language I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is available for use for students who wish to develop their ability to speak, read and write and understand a sub-Saharan African language. Instruction is offered through a distance-learning, course share program at Indiana University. At the Elementary level, instruction is currently offered in Bamana and Zulu, with the possibility of instruction in Wolof in the near future. At the Elementary level, the goal it to provide students with a basic but solid knowledge of morphology and syntax, functional vocabulary, and practice in speaking and writing.

AAS 535. Intermediate African Language I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

AAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies
Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

AAS 564 / MUSICOL 564. Music of Latin America and the Caribbean
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

AAS 595 / HISTORY 595. Topics in African History
CAAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit. (African Studies).

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of topics in African history.

AAS 596 / NRE 596. History of Environmental Thought and Activism
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

AAS 600. Proseminar: Interdisciplinary Approaches to African Studies
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the history, societies, and political-economic development of sub-Saharan Africa. The course largely draws on the research expertise of members of the AAS faculty and is aimed at broadening graduate student understanding of the continent, allowing a forum for the interchange of ideas among grad students in a diversity of disciplines.

AAS 601. Interdisciplinary Approaches to African American and Diasporan Studies
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to a cluster of traditional and current topical questions commonly treated in the fields of African-American and Diasporan Studies and explores the various interdisciplinary approaches that can be used to address them.

AAS 629 / HISTORY 629. Studies in African History
(3). May be elected four times for credit.

Readings and discussions on various topics in African History.

AAS 634 / SOC 634. The Urban Ethnographic Tradition: Theory, Method, Standpoint
Graduate standing; seniors with permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

By paying specific attention to literature that addresses race and class inequality, this course provides a critical consideration of the contributions of the urban ethnographic tradition in American sociology. A series of classic and contemporary ethnographies will be discussed in seminar-style format.

AAS 662 / EPID 666. Health and Socioeconomic Development
BIOSTAT 503 or BIOSTAT 553 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Reviews links between health conditions and socioeconomic development in low-income countries and trends in health and development indicators; socio-economic determinants of health, including poverty and income, education, nutrition, fertility, and culture and behavior; impact of globalization in terms of neo-liberal policies, trade and capital flows and the urbanization and their growth of the informal economy; examines the effects of health changes on economic growth and development.

AAS 781 / HISTORY 781. Seminar in Black American History
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

AAS 786 / HISTORY 786. Seminar in African History
(3). May be elected three times for credit.

This seminar is about the mechanics of writing African history. It surveys the genesis of the field, and brings into view the range of entrepreneurs who composed African history. Students will, over the course of the semester, assemble evidence, develop a line of argument, and write a publication-ready essay.

AAS 890. Capstone Course
AAS 600. (3 - 6). May not be repeated for credit.

This capstone seminar facilitates work on independent research projects that can form the basis in master's thesis, a dissertation chapter, or a publishable article.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2012 Regents of the University of Michigan