Graduate Course Catalog
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Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
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Courses in LSA Astronomy
Astronomy (ASTRO)
ASTRO 402. Stellar Astrophysics
MATH 215, 255 or 285, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 340 or PHYSICS 360, or graduate standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) MATH 216, 256 or 286 and ASTRO 201. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

Examines the appearance, structure, and evolution of stars. Covers the physical processes that cause stars to have their observed structures; energy generation through nucleosynthesis; the physical laws that lead to the structure of stars; the transfer of radiation through the outer parts of the star; how spectroscopic information informs us as to the composition and motion of stars; and the late stages of stellar evolution and death.

ASTRO 404. Galaxies and the Universe
MATH 215, 255 or 285, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 340 or PHYSICS 360, or graduate standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) MATH 216, 256 or 286 and ASTRO 102, 142 or 201. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

Examines the properties of galaxies, large-scale structure in the universe, and cosmological models. The basic aspects of galaxies are explained, orbital theory, spiral arms, the missing mass in galaxies, galaxy evolution, and the starburst phenomenon. The clustering of galaxies, the hot intracluster medium and the dynamical evolution of clusters. Expansion of the universe, the cosmic microwave background, the inflationary universe, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and the origin and growth of structure in the universe.

ASTRO 405. High Energy Astrophysics
MATH 216, 256 or 286, ASTRO 201, PHYSICS 340 or 360, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 390. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

Examines the underlying astrophysics of violent astronomical phenomena that produce energetic particles under exotic circumstances. Covers high-energy radiation processes and basic fluid mechanics. The physics are applied to accretion onto black holes and other compact objects and the astronomical phenomena that result. Includes study of supernovae, the origin of X-ray and Gamma-ray background radiation fields, Gamma-ray bursts, and cosmic rays.

ASTRO 406. Computational Astrophysics
Prior or concurrent enrollment in MATH 216, 256 or 286, prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 235, 240 or 260, and some knowledge of programming. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

Computational Astrophysics develops a practical working knowledge of the most widely used numerical methods in astrophysics. The theory underlying the methods is one important aspect of the course, but theory is put into practice by development and use of numerical routines (some already written) in the computer environment. With an emphasis on astrophysical issues, we first cover some of the most common scientific numerical methods, such as interpolation, curve fitting, root finding, quadrature, numerical integration of differential equations, and matrix solutions to sets of linear equations. Fourier methods are widely used throughout astrophysics, and both the basic theory and the most useful applications are presented. The last major topic is the numerical statistical analysis, with particular emphasis on the peculiarities and pitfalls associated with real astronomical data.

ASTRO 461. Ground-Based Observatories
Consent of department required. ASTRO 201 and ASTRO 361. (3 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Sp. (Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona).

In this immersion course held in residence at Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona, we discuss the scientific, technical, and political aspects of ground-based research observatories. The course features the MDM Observatory, of which UM is a consortium member. We also take advantage of the many other, nearby astronomical facilities, both on- and off-site, to study the variety of instrumentation and telescope properties. Students use MDM telescopes to carry out small science projects. We also examine observatories in the context of their natural and sociopolitical environment, and their relationship to local communities, with emphasis on education and public outreach.

ASTRO 501. Modern Astronomical Techniques
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 530. Stellar Astrophysics I: Star Formation and the Outer Layers of Stars
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course covers the assembly of stars and their protoplanetary disks from cold gas dust in the interstellar medium. Specific topics include fragmentation, disk dynamics, and jets. Radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and envelopes, essential to interpreting observations of stars and their environs, is addressed in the second part.

ASTRO 531. Stellar Astrophysics II: Stellar Structure and Evolution
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course covers the physical principles that determine the structure and the evolution of stars. The stellar structure equations and the physical processes taking place in stellar interiors are discussed in the first part. These principles are applied to the understanding of stellar evolution in the second part.

ASTRO 532. The High Energy Universe
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 533. The Structure and Content of Galaxies
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 534. The Extragalactic Universe
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 535. Astrophysics of the Interstellar Medium
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 699. Special Problems
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 901. Research in Theoretical Astrophysics
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 902. Research in Observational Astrophysics
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

ASTRO 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

ASTRO 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

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