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Courses in LSA Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB)
EEB 400. Advanced Research
Consent of instructor required. 12 credits of BIOLOGY, 3.0 average in science, and permission of instructor in EEB. (1 - 3). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. Three credits of independent research must be completed in one term to satisfy a Biology laboratory requirement. A maximum of three credits of any independent study course may count toward the Biology concentration programs.

EEB 401. Advanced Topics in Biology
Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section. (2 - 3). (BS). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course is designed to acquaint students with a specialized area of Biology that is not a usual part of the Biology Department curriculum. Topics vary from term to term and are listed in the Schedule of Classes.

EEB 404 / MCDB 404. Genetics, Development, and Evolution
BIOLOGY 305. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the field of evolution and development, with an emphasis on genetics as a unifying force. After reviewing fundamental principles in development and evolutionary biology, papers from the primary literature investigating the molecular mechanisms responsible for evolutionary change will be discussed.

EEB 405. Biological Station Special Topics
College course in biology, chemistry, and ecology. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course will provide advanced undergraduate and graduate students with a comprehensive and integrated understanding of topics specific to a field station in northern Michigan.

EEB 408. Modeling for Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
MATH 116 or equivalent; and BIOLOGY 171, 172 or 174, & 173 or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

An introductory course in the creation and analysis of mathematical models in ecology and evolutionary biology, teaching students the derivation and analysis of simple models formulated using ordinary differential or recursion equations, and demonstrating the application of those skills to example core models in ecology and evolutionary biology.

EEB 412. Molecular Ecology
BIOLOGY 305 and 390, or equivalents. Population genetics and ecology desirable. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Molecular Ecology is an academic discipline that links research in ecology and evolution through the use of DNA markers. This class surveys the most important DNA markers and analytical methods currently used in Molecular Ecology. Topics include population structure, kinship, parentage, community phylogeny, phylogeography, microbial ecology and species discovery.

EEB 420. Plant Evolution
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173; AND BIOLOGY 230 or equivalent. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims to give students an advanced and updated perspective of plant evolution on the following topics: phylogenetic concepts, a phylogeny of photosynthetic life, evolution of genomes in plants, evolution of development (molecular genetics, biochemistry, and physiology), and evolution of interaction of plants with their abiotic and biotic environment.

EEB 424 / ENVIRON 415 / NRE 415. Behavioral Ecology and Conservation Biology
BIOLOGY 162 or 171 and completion or concurrent enrollment in either ENVIRON 415 or EEB 424 or NRE 415. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 492.

This course will focus on the ways environments shape the behavior and life histories of animals. Because environments pose constraints, behaviors have "better" and "worse" impacts on an organism's survival and reproduction. This course will consider hypothesis in five areas.

EEB 425 / ENVIRON 416 / NRE 416. Field Skills in Wildlife Behavior
BIOLOGY 162 or 171 and completion or concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON 415. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 492.

Students gain field skills in testing behavioral ecological hypotheses. Field work stresses repeatable, quantitative observation, generation of testable hypotheses, graphical and statistical data analysis, and oral and written communication.

EEB 430 / CMPLXSYS 430. Modeling Infectious Diseases
Consent of instructor required. MATH 115 or 120. (3). (BS). (QR/2). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Understanding the spread, evolution and control of infectious diseases requires integrating processes that occur at many scales: infection and pathogenesis within a host, transmission among hosts and long-term evolutionary forces. Mathematical and computational models provide a unique perspective for understanding disease dynamics at these scales individually, but also within an integrated framework. By combining lectures and computer labs, we formulate and analyze various models relating to infectious disease biology, with particular attention to their management control.

EEB 431. Ecology of Animal Parasites
Two laboratory courses in BIOLOGY. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Meets June 26 - August 21, 2010.

EEB 433 / ENVIRON 433 / NRE 433. Ornithology
BIOLOGY 171 and (172 or 174) and 173, or BIOLOGY 195 and 173. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

During the lecture, students have the opportunity to learn about many unique features of birds. In the mandatory lab, students have the opportunity to learn about birds by using museum specimens, and by observing birds on field trips.

EEB 436 / ENVIRON 436 / NRE 436. Woody Plants: Biology and Identification
BIOLOGY 162 or 171. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Ecology, systematic and identification of trees, shrubs, and vines are studies in weekly field trips to diverse Michigan ecosystems--including upland, wetland, and floodplain forests. Lectures focus on glacial landscape history, biogeography, and ecology of Michigan forests.

EEB 440 / ENVIRON 422 / NRE 422. Biology of Fishes
BIOLOGY 162 or 171, 172 and 173. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

Lectures cover many aspects of the biology of lower vertebrates known as fishes, including evolution, physiology, functional morphology, phylogeny, biogeography, ecology, and reproduction. The systematic position of fish among vertebrates is discussed and exemplary assemblages exam.

EEB 441 / ENVIRON 423 / NRE 423. The Biology of Fishes Laboratory
BIOLOGY 162 or 171, 172 and 173. (1). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

This lab provides an intro to field methods used in fish biology and fisheries, and examines the diversity of the Michigan ichthyofauna and major groups of would fishes.

EEB 442. Biology of Insects
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (4; 5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Emphasis on living animals and evolution. Embryology, development, and molting; elementary physiology, ecology, genetics and behavior, and functional external and internal morphology; and geological history. Classification of adults and immatures.

EEB 445 / EARTH 445. Biogeography
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. One course in historical geology is recommended. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how evolution proceeds through time in relation to geography. The course explores the limitation of distributions of organisms by barriers, including climate, effects on species formation and extinction, species abundance and richness, dispersal, and vicariance.

EEB 446. Microbial Ecology
Introductory Microbiology (BIOLOGY 207 or the equivalent) and one 300-level or above biology course [Microbial diversity (EEB 470) and general ecology (EEB 281/381) are recommended.]. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

For the Microbiology concentration, this course counts as a Group 1 Specified Elective.

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This course covers the ecology of microbes by highlighting their interactions with each other and the environment. An emphasis is placed on Bacteria, Archaea, and their viruses. The course aims at uncovering how concepts developed in plant and animal ecology do and do not translate to the microbial world.

EEB 450. Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (5). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Lectures on the evolution, behavior, ecology, and life history of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory exercises and field trips emphasize indentification, life history, adaptations, and field methods.

EEB 451 / ENVIRON 451 / NRE 451. Biology of Mammals
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F. (Offered in alternate years). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Evolution, distribution, ecology, behavior, anatomy, and classification of mammals, with emphasis on North American species.

EEB 453. Field Mammalogy
Two laboratory courses in BIOLOGY. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. (Offered in even years at the Biological Station). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

EEB 455. Ethnobotany
Two college-level courses in BIOLOGY. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

EEB 456 / ENVIRON 456. Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands
BIOLOGY 171 or one introductory biology course and another natural science course. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims for students to acquire an understanding of the basic concepts of ecosystem structure and function of the diverse herbaceous and forested wetlands along the Great Lakes coasts.

EEB 457. Algae in Freshwater Ecosystems
Two laboratory courses in Botany. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. (Offered in even years at the Biological Station). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

EEB 459. Systematic Botany
BIOLOGY 171, (172 or 174) & 173; or BIOLOGY 195 & 173; OR BIOLOGY 255. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Principles of systematic botany, including training in the major groups of vascular plants in terms of their morphology, anatomy, cytology, ecology, and reproductive biology, as well as problems win numerical taxonomy, biosystematics, and botanical nomenclature. Laboratory includes plant specimens and visual aids.

EEB 463. Neotropical Plant Families
BIOLOGY 215 or EEB 459. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

This course will introduce students to generic-level organization of 25 neo-tropical plant families. Families covered are 1) ecologically widespread and abundant in the neo-tropics or 2) of taxonomic or economic significance. Meetings include lectures on comparative morphology, anatomy, and ecological/economic significance of families and their included genera, and a laboratory during which students examine dried specimens.

EEB 466 / MATH 466. Mathematical Ecology
MATH 217, 417, or 419; MATH 256, 286, or 316; and MATH 450 or 451. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course gives an overview of mathematical approaches to questions in the science of ecology. Topics include: formulation of deterministic and stochastic population models; dynamics of single-species populations; and dynamics of interacting populations (perdition, competition, and mutualism), structured populations, and epidemiology. Emphasis is placed on model formulation and techniques of analysis.

EEB 468. Biology of Fungi
BIOLOGY 305, EEB 390, or BIOLOGY 281 strongly suggested. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to the fungi through lectures, laboratories, and field trips. We explore fungal biodiversity, ecology, genetics, and the importance of fungi in food and human health. Practical experience, such as isolation and identification of mushrooms, yeasts, and molds is included.

EEB 470. Microbial Diversity
Junior standing; BIOLOGY 207 and at least one 300 level course in the Biological Sciences. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

The course describes the biological diversity of prokaryotic microorganisms, members of the Domain Bacteria and Domain Archaea, examining the evolutionary origins of microbial life, the metabolic roles extant prokaryotes carry out in maintaining the biosphere, their physiological adaptations to the environment and to environmental extremes, and modern phylogenetic approaches for their identification and evolutionary analysis.

EEB 472. Plant-Animal Interactions
BIOLOGY 281. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

EEB 476 / ENVIRON 476 / NRE 476. Ecosystem Ecology
General Ecology and a 400-level course in Aquatic or Terrestrial Ecology. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W.

Current theories about the control and function of ecosystems, the approaches and techniques being used to test these theories, and the application of theory to the management and restoration of ecosystems.

EEB 477. Laboratory in Field Ecology
A course in Ecology. (5). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

EEB 483. Freshwater Ecosystems: Limnology
Sophomores and above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) One course in each of the following: Ecology, Chemistry, and Physics. (4). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed EEB 484. W.

This is a lab field course that focuses on the physical, chemical, and biological controls of aquatic ecosystems. It addresses major topics such as nutrient enrichment, food/web interactions, and invasive species. The lab component provides instruction on modern field techniques and laboratory analyses used in aquatic research.

EEB 485. Population and Community Ecology
(4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Principles governing the phenomena of single and interacting populations are examined, from basic tenets to cutting-edge research questions. Population and community-level perspectives are integrated by drawing parallels between approaches and considering how to scale up from the phenomena of one or a few species to the structure and dynamics of whole communities.

EEB 486. Biology and Ecology of Fish
Two laboratory courses in BIOLOGY. (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. (Offered in odd years at the Biological Station). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

EEB 487 / ENVIRON 409 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes
BIOLOGY 162 or 171, 172 and 173. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. W. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement only if the student signs up for four credits.

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between fish and the physical, chemical, and biological parameters of major habitat types; adaptations of fish for survival under different constraints.

EEB 489 / ENVIRON 430 / NRE 430. Soil Ecology
BIOLOGY 162 or 171 and 172 and 173, and General Chemistry. Concurrent enrollment in ENVIRON 436/EEB 436 and ENVIRON 435/NRE 435 highly recommended. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Soils as central components of terrestrial ecosystems. Major emphasis is placed on physical, chemical, and biological properties and their relationships to plant growth and ecosystem processes. Understanding is developed using a combination of lectures, field- and lab-based exercises, and individual research.

EEB 490. Evolution at the Population Level
BIOLOGY 305. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course deals with evolution of life from the population-level perspective, which ignores internal structure of organisms and, instead, considers their external features, emphasizing gene transmission and natural selection.

EEB 491. Phylogenetic Methods and Theory
BIOLOGY 171, 172 or 174, & 173 or BIOLOGY 195 & 173. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course covers theory and methods used in phylogenetics. Topics will include sequence manipulation and alignment, dataset assembly, phylogenetic reconstruction, tree searching, character reconstruction, and dating analyses. Prior programming experience is helpful but not required; familiarity with computers is assumed.

EEB 492. Behavioral Ecology
BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 172 or 174 or [195 & 173]. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) BIOLOGY 390 or EEB 390. (3; 5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. (Offered in odd years at the Biological Station).

This course explores the behavior of animals in their natural environment. Students develop their understanding of evolution and learn how to apply natural selection to understand why animals behave the way they do.

EEB 494 / MCDB 494. Teaching College Science
Consent of department required. Science concentrators having completed a range of courses, such as BIOLOGY 171,172 and 173; BIOLOGY 225, 281, 305 or EEB 390; CHEM 130, 210 or 211; PHYSICS 140 or 160; or EARTH 119. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course helps students build a foundation of knowledge about effective science teaching. It is both scholarly and practical in nature. Students construct an understanding of fundamental principles and sound pedagogy that they apply to their own teaching.

EEB 498. The Ecology of Agroecosystems
A course in Ecology. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

EEB 512. Molecular and Genomic Evolution
BIOLOGY 305 and one upper-level course in either Molecular or Evolutionary Biology; permission of instructor and Graduate standing. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine processes and patterns of evolution at the molecular level, as well as methods of phylogenetic analysis using molecular characters, such as amino acid sequences, DNA sequences, and features of genome organization. These evolutionary topics and methods are key components in the developing field of bioinformatics.

EEB 516. Principles of Evolution
BIOLOGY 305. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides a foundation in evolutionary biology for students whose professional activities will require familiarity with this field. It includes lectures and discussion on major principles in population genetics molecular and phenotypic evolution, speciation, evolutionary developmental biology phylogenetics, and macroevolution. Fundamental principles are discussed in relation to topics of active contemporary research and controversy.

EEB 544 / HUMGEN 544. Basic Concepts in Population and Statistical Genetics
A foundation in genetics and familiarity with the basic statistics and probability. (3). (BS). May be elected twice for credit.

The objective of this course is to introduce the fundamental concepts and methods of population and statistical genetics as they apply to human populations. Topics include the major forces impacting population genetic variation, quantitative genetics, linkage analysis, tests of association, complex or multi-factorial traits and diseases, and the role of the environment. Discussion of many of these topics will be based on particular papers from the literature.

EEB 556. Field Botany of Northern Michigan
A course in Systematic Botany (EEB 459). (5 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

EEB 590. Natural History and Evolution
Consent of department required. (5 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 390.

The course will be taught only at the Biological Station and is being requested as a graduate-level version of EEB 390 that is currently offered there. Graduate students will have weekly 2-hour meetings with a mentor to discuss readings in ecology and evolution. They will also devise, carry out, and present on a research project, and submit a written research paper on the project by the end of the term.

EEB 595. Tropical Biology: An Ecological Approach
BIOLOGY,Graduate standing and four courses in biology. Information and application forms available from Professors Vandermeer or Wagner. (8). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

EEB 601. Readings in Investigative Biology
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

EEB 700. Advanced Study in Biology
Consent of instructor required. 16 hours in Biology, Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

EEB 730. Advanced Zoological Studies
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 8). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

EEB 755. Special Studies in Botany
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1 - 16; 1 - 8 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

EEB 790. Masters Thesis Research
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

This course is intended for EEB Master's students who are completing a research project and writing a thesis.

EEB 800. Biology Seminars
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (1). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

EEB 801. Supervised Teaching
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Appointment as Teaching Assistant in Biology. (1 - 2). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

EEB 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

EEB 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

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