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Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
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Courses in LSA History of Art
History of Art (HISTART)
HISTART 406 / AAS 407. Looking at African Things
HISTART 208/AAS 208. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course examines the shifting historical terms and narratives that constitute and justify the creation, display and reception of African object, both in and out of Africa, in such contexts as museums, photographic archives, world's fairs, theme parks and other cultural spectacles.

HISTART 408 / AAS 480. Visual Culture as History in Africa
AAS 200 (CAAS 200). (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Employing the analytical and interpretive methods of art history, archaeology, and history, this course examines artifacts and architecture from a number of African societies as historical "documents" of the past, and also as agents of social, political, religious, and economic processes that were used to shape the histories of these societies.

HISTART 422 / CLARCH 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of the architecture, sculpture and painting of the Etruscans with special reference to Greek (and other) influences and the Etruscan impact on Rome.

HISTART 424 / CLARCH 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 430 / CLARCH 420. Greece before History: The Art and Archaeology of Greek Lands ca 3500 to 700 BCE
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the origins, character and collapse of complex societies of the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean. Sources of evidence include architecture, artifacts, mortuary practices and the distribution of sites within the wider landscape. We also explore recent work on documentary sources, including the linear B (Mycenean) tablets.

HISTART 433 / CLARCH 433. Greek Sculpture
Upperclass standing, some preparation in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology or History of Art. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

History of Greek sculpture from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE. Treats free-standing statuary and relief and architectural sculpture in stone, bronze, terracotta, and gold and ivory. Examines evolving functions of Greek sculpture, and relationships between stylistic development and social and political change.

HISTART 435 / CLARCH 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 439 / CLARCH 439. Greek Vase Painting
Upperclass standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 440 / CLARCH 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 443 / CLARCH 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization
Upperclass standing and CLARCH/HISTART 221. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The 8th and 7th centuries saw Greeks migrating from their home cities and countrysides to new settlements in many corners of the Mediterranean world. The course explores the art and archaeology of their colonization. They went South to Egypt and Libya, North to unoccupied tracts of Thrace, yet further North to explore the coasts of the Black Sea and its hinterland, and as far West as France and Spain. The most thoroughgoing of these new settlements were perhaps in Sicily and South Italy where new Greek cities came to rival the cities of their motherland in size, power, splendor and wealth.

HISTART 460. Renaissance Architecture
HISTART 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The course examines the architecture of the Renaissance--the buildings and cities of the 15th and 16th centuries in Italy, France, and England.

HISTART 463. Art and Visual Culture in the Dutch Golden Age
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the role of the pictorial arts in the making of the Dutch Republic. It considers painting, drawing, prints, maps, book illustrations and the range of pictorial technologies that constituted Dutch visual culture in the seventeenth century, and generated new ways of seeing and understanding the world.

HISTART 465. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany
Upperclass standing and HISTART 102. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The architectural forms and complexes of baroque Rome, Turin, and Vienna and their final flowering in the churches and palaces of southern Germany in late 18th century.

HISTART 469 / ASIAN 469. Modern Chinese Visual Culture
ASIAN 261. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the changing visual experiences and expressions in China from the early twentieth century to the present. A range of visual materials will be studied. We will also consider studies of and theories about visual culture from other contexts and why visual culture is fundamental to Chinese modernity.

HISTART 474. Topics in Modern and Contemporary Architecture
Any 100- or 200-level course in art history or architecture. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

An upper-level seminar on special topics in modern and contemporary architecture.

HISTART 475. America Builds: Architecture and the Built Environment from the Civil War to the Present
HISTART 213 or similar. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This 400-level lecture course surveys the history of American architecture and cities from the Civil War to the present. It focuses on buildings, infrastructure, the public reception of architecture, and the urban frame in which buildings interact with one another and their users.

HISTART 479 / AMCULT 479. The Arts in American Life
Prior coursework in History of Art or American Culture or American History; and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

A focused, critical examination of the relation of art, architecture, and material objects to specific problems in American culture and history. (Topics and subtitles vary).

HISTART 480. Disney's Lands: Consuming Wonders in America
Consent of instructor required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the Disney parks from several vantage points, focusing on individual themed lands within them to address broader fields of historical representation. They include the depiction of the American Frontier, colonialist Adventure, childhood Fantasy, and utopian Tomorrow. Readings are interdisciplinary. Planned field trips include a required 3-day visit to Disneyland in Florida.

HISTART 481 / CLARCH 481. Art of Ancient Iran
Upperclass standing and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture
(1 - 3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics of this course vary depending upon the special interest of faculty and opportunities that arise to enrich the curriculum in particular ways. The particular topic in each case will be indicated by a subtitle.

HISTART 490. Working with Objects: Islamic Textiles, Metalwork, Ceramics, Glass, and Coins
HISTART 285. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This seminar introduces students to the social, cultural, and religious history of Islamic art through a selection of objects held in the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology. Objects that will be studied and examined hands-on in the museum include Islamic ceramics, glasswares, metalwares, coins, amulets, textiles, manuscripts, and calligraphies.

HISTART 494. Encounters with Islamic Art: Studying, Collecting, and Reviving
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course addresses Islamic art of the pre-modern period along with its scholarly reception, collection, and revival during the 19th and 20th centuries. It explores the many ways in which collectors, scholars, artists, and architects have encountered Islamic artistic traditions during the modern period. It aims to highlight how Islamic art -as a constructed scholarly discipline and corpus of selected objects- must be considered a global phenomenon that has been constructed through the efforts of various artistic entrepreneurs at the same time as it has been entangled in the cultural politics of Colonialism, Orientalism, and globalization over the course of the past two centuries.

HISTART 495 / ASIAN 494. Ocean of Stories: Telling Tales in the Indian Subcontinent
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course investigates painters' engagements with India's literatures. Beginning with storytelling in contemporary artworks, this course proceeds to examine the emergence, refinement, and dispersion of literary and pictorial conventions in cosmopolitan early India and their transformations in later periods when book arts interacted with vernacularization, performative traditions, and eventually print culture.

HISTART 504 / ANTHRCUL 502 / ASIAN 502 / CCS 502 / HISTORY 548 / POLSCI 502. Humanistic Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine the present state of research in selected areas of scholarly inquiry in Chinese studies - language, literature, history, religion material culture, and art history - as we interrogate such seemingly commonsense notions as "civilization," "culture," "tradition," "modernity," and above all, "Chineseness." Our goals are to develop good reading skills, stimulate critical thinking, and inspire imaginative approaches to humanistic problems.

HISTART 534 / CLARCH 534. Ancient Painting
Upperclass standing, HISTART 101 and either HISTART/CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

HISTART 536 / CLARCH 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
HISTART 101; one of CLARCH 221 or 222 or HISTART 221 or 222; and Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

HISTART 600. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. Permission of graduate advisor. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

HISTART 615. First Year Graduate Seminar
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 617. Visual Valence: Case Explorations in the Critical Analysis of Material Culture
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 646. Problems in Medieval Art
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

HISTART 666. Problems in 17th Century Art and Visual Culture
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be elected three times for credit.

HISTART 677. Studies in American Art
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

HISTART 680. Bio-Art International: Biotechnology, Genetics, and Contemporary Art
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An Exploration of art forms produced from using biotechnology and/or genetic engineering to create, manipulate, and/or transform living things. These new art forms cross-confuse the boundaries between "the artificial" and "the natural," and provoke complex ethnical questions.

HISTART 689. Special Topics in History of Art
Graduate student standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics of this course vary depending upon the special interest of faculty and opportunities that arise to enrich the curriculum in particular ways.

HISTART 690 / ASIAN 694. Topics in the Theory and Criticism of Chinese Art
(3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to investigate the historical development of terminology and issues in Chinese art criticism and theory and to relate this developments to contemporaneous developments in the style and subject matter of visual art.

HISTART 692 / ASIAN 692. Buddhas and Bodies: Icons of the Ideal in Japanese Religious Art
HISTART 103 or 292. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the history of Japanese religions through the visual arts. Sculpture, painting and Architecture serve as the primary sources for our exploration of Buddhism, Kami, worship, and Christianity. Discussions engage in many social and religious issues, paying special attention to the tension between the ideal and the "real".

HISTART 694. Special Studies in the Art of China
(3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

HISTART 700. Independent Research
Consent of instructor required. Approval of Graduate advisor. Graduate standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

HISTART 710. Chartres: Anatomy of a Medieval Cathedral
Reading knowledge of German or French desired. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Reading knowledge of German or French desired.

Structured around a week-long field trip with on site discussions. This seminar provides an in-depth investigation into the history, art, architecture and historiography of the Gothic Cathedral of Chartres.

HISTART 720 / WOMENSTD 720. Gender and Sexuality in the Visual Arts
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be elected three times for credit.

HISTART 754. Studies in Sixteenth Century Italian Art
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

HISTART 771. Problems in Art of the Nineteenth Century
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

HISTART 772. Problems in Modern Art
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

HISTART 773. Problems in Art of the Twentieth Century
Permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

A course on problems in arts of the twentieth century. Content varies by term and instructor.

HISTART 815 / CLARCH 815. Hellenistic Cities of the Near East
Graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 820 / CLARCH 820. Approaches to Archaeological Field Survey
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

HISTART 822 / CLARCH 822. Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 841 / CLARCH 841. Topography of Rome
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 842 / CLARCH 842. Topography and Monuments of Athens
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 844 / CLARCH 844. Theoretical Issues in Archaeology
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

HISTART 855 / CLARCH 855. Problems in Roman Archaeology
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

The proposed course is designed to promote flexibility in our graduate teaching in Roman archaeology (as part of the Interdepartmental Program in Classical Art and Archaeology). Having such a 'open' course title available will encourage faculty to experiment with new seminars on their own current research, or on a subject of interest to a body of graduate students, without having to generate course proposals well ahead of time and without multiplying course numbers endlessly. Similarly structured course titles are available in related subjects (e.g. CA 849 - Problems in Greek Sculpture; CA 850 - Problems in Roman Sculpture) and seem to work quite well. Projected seminars to be held under this heading include: Problems in Roman Archaeology: Dynamics of Resistance and Accommodation, and Problems in Roman Archaeology: The Roman East.

HISTART 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

HISTART 993. Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Graduate standing. (1). May not be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

HISTART 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

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