Graduate Course Catalog
Effective Term
Requirement or Grouping
Listings Per Page
Subject
  or   Department
Show Descriptions Show Course Guide Term Links For Past Two Years
Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
   Page 1 of 1, Results 1 - 21 of 21   
Courses in LSA Judaic Studies

The Jean and Samuel Frankel Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan offers students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Jewish civilizations and thought. The program explores the rich culture and historical experience of the Jewish people, their unique traditions, interactions with other cultures, and impact on world civilizations. It draws on the academic excellence and expertise of faculty in many disciplines, including History; Political Science; Near Eastern studies; Germanic, English, Slavic, and Hebrew and Yiddish languages; Sociology; and Comparative Literature.

Judaic Studies (JUDAIC)
JUDAIC 401. Readings in Yiddish Texts
Two years of Yiddish or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

JUDAIC 417. Topics in Judaic Studies
(3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Intended for advanced undergraduates interested in the interdisciplinary field of Judaic Studies, this course examines selected topics in areas such as literature, history, philosophy, film, political science and law. Although taught in English by regular faculty in Judaic Studies or visiting faculty, some topics may require students to interpret various texts and to situate them in relation to historical traditional contexts.

JUDAIC 431 / YIDDISH 431. Beginning Yiddish 1 for Graduate Students
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 101 or YIDDISH 101. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 101 or YIDDISH 101. F.

This is the first of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish.

JUDAIC 432 / YIDDISH 432. Beginning Yiddish 2 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 431/YIDDISH 431 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 101/YIDDISH 101. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 102 or YIDDISH 102. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 102 or YIDDISH 102. W.

This is the second of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish .

JUDAIC 435 / HISTORY 435 / RUSSIAN 435. Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and the Arts
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Course surveys major trends of cultural development of Jews in Russia from late 18th to early 21st centuries, focusing on literary and artistic creativity in Russian cultural context. Special attention is given to two major centers in Odessa and St. Petersburg treated as two different models of Jewish cultural life.

JUDAIC 467 / HJCS 577 / RELIGION 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Topics within history of modern Judaism such as reform and tradition in modern Judaism, theological responses to the Holocaust, modern Jewish philosophy. Topics will change.

JUDAIC 468 / HJCS 478 / RELIGION 469. Jewish Mysticism
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A critical study of the historical development of Jewish mysticism, its symbolic universe and its social ramifications. While the course will survey mystical traditions from the early rabbinic period through the modern, the focus will be on the variegated medieval stream known as kabbalah.

JUDAIC 478 / HJCS 477 / RELIGION 478. Modern Jewish Thought
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

JUDAIC 496. Independent Studies
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

JUDAIC 500. Independent Study in Judaic Studies
Consent of department required. Graduate standing and permission of instructor/department. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

JUDAIC 505 / HJCS 576. Introduction to Jewish Civilizations and Culture
Graduate standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 205/HJCS 276.

An interdisciplinary, introductory survey of Jewish civilization and culture from Biblical times to the present in many countries. Jewish culture and civilization, among the oldest extant, have been enriched by their development in different cultural contexts. The course includes history, rabbinics, Jewish Thought, Hebrew and Yiddish literatures, sociology, political science.

JUDAIC 517. Topics in Judaic Studies
(1 - 4). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course may cover topics in such areas as literature, history, philosophy, film, political science and law as they relate to Judaic Studies.

JUDAIC 531 / YIDDISH 531. Intermediate Yiddish 1 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 432 or YIDDISH 432; or JUDAIC 102 YIDDISH 102; or placement exam. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 201 or YIDDISH 201. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 201 or YIDDISH 201. F.

This is the third term of a language sequence in Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed.

JUDAIC 532 / YIDDISH 532. Intermediate Yiddish 2 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 531/YIDDISH 531 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 201/YIDDISH 201. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 202 or YIDDISH 202. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 202 or YIDDISH 202. W.

This is the fourth term of a language sequence of Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed.

JUDAIC 570 / ACABS 570 / HJCS 570. Reading the Rabbis
Second year proficiency in Hebrew (HJCS 202). (4). May not be repeated for credit.

The class will study rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory in rabbinic literature.

JUDAIC 600. Judaic Studies Graduate Independent Study
(1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 16 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This will be Independent Study course for master's and doctoral students, and only rarely for exceptional undergraduates.

JUDAIC 601. Introduction to Methods and Topics in Judaic Studies
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

This course introduces graduate students to the disciplines, texts, and methods of Jewish studies. Students read textural materials from various eras of Jewish history (from antiquity to the modern period) and current scholarly literature that illustrates critical and disciplinary approaches to these texts.

JUDAIC 631 / YIDDISH 631. Advanced Yiddish 1 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 532/YIDDISH 532 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 202/YIDDISH 202. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 301 or YIDDISH 301. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 301 or YIDDISH 301. F.

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music.

JUDAIC 632 / YIDDISH 632. Advanced Yiddish 2 for Graduate Students
JUDAIC 631/YIDDISH 631 or placement by exam; will also accept JUDAIC 301/YIDDISH 301. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 302 or YIDDISH 302. Undergraduate students elect JUDAIC 302 or YIDDISH 302. W.

This is the final term of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music.

JUDAIC 652 / POLSCI 652. Jewish Political Thought and Experiences: Eastern Europe, America and Israel
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Eastern Europe, America and Israel: An exploration of political ideas in "classical" Jewish texts and how these ideas were or were not implemented in sovereign Jewish states, ancient and contemporary, and in Jewish self-government in the diaspora. We analyze the transformation of Jewish political life from traditional to modern modes: from oligarchical to mass politics, from kehillot to political parties, from pleading to political mobilization. Zionism, Bundism, and Communism are among the movements studied. We survey Jewish political behavior in America and study the Jewish and other sources of political thought and behavior in Israel.

JUDAIC 890. Judaic Studies Capstone Research Course
(3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

The mandatory capstone research course requires a student to carry out a culminating research project in Jewish studies that reflects an interdisciplinary perspective. The product can be a dissertation chapter, a master's thesis, or a substantive paper. The student will present the work in at least one public forum.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2012 Regents of the University of Michigan