Graduate Course Catalog
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Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
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Courses in LSA Screen Arts & Cultures
Screen Arts and Cultures (SAC)
SAC 400. Dramatic Narrative II
SAC 300; and concentration in Screen Arts and Cultures. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an intermediate sync-sound movie production course. It familiarizes students with dramatic narrative (any genre comedy to drama) sync-sound movie production from interpreting the screenplay through sync-sound shooting and post-production. Students have access to high-end production equipment and work in large teams to produce a substantial sync-sound final project. They also participate in dramatic narrative productions in class in collaboration with Theatre and Drama students.

SAC 401. Documentary II
SAC 301, SAC concentrators only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This advanced course is designed to teach the theoretical, aesthetic and technical principles of making compelling non-fiction productions. The class includes readings and viewing of clips to investigate current and past issues in non-fiction production that include documentary form, objectivity in documentary production, ethics, and representation.

SAC 402. Television II
SAC 302, SAC concentrators only. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an advanced course in television production focusing on a multi-camera studio or location production. Possible topics may include Situation Comedy or Live Event Production.

SAC 404. Exp Screen II
A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: SAC 300, 301, 302, or 306; and permission of instructor. (1 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An advanced course in special production topics that may include film, video, television and/or digital production within a particular subject area and/or approach to the medium. It also may focus on collaborations with other courses or units.

SAC 406. New Media Practices II
Consent of instructor required. SAC 306 or equivalent experience and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This intensive course further explores and builds upon the practices and strategies in SAC 306. Students work individually and in small groups to research new media practice, new software and hardware, and new presentation methods. Rotating topics include: special effects for cinema; audio/visual performance; web-based serial production; and 2D digital animation. Research and seminar-based presentations along with workshops and demonstrations ultimately culminate in the design and production of individual or team-based final projects.

SAC 410. Screenwriting II: The Rewrite
SAC 310 and SAC concentrators. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course follows SAC 310 as an intermediate course in the art and practice of screenwriting. It stresses creative dramatic writing and focuses on critical tools for rewriting. Each student is expected to write or rewrite a feature length screenplay.

SAC 422. Topics in Avant-Garde Film
SAC 230 or 236. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Historical and theoretical studies of topics in avant-garde film and video. The class examines the cultural contexts of the firms as well as their formal innovations.

SAC 423. Practicum for the Screenwriter
SAC 290, 310, and 410. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This class is a writing practicum where the student will learn the role of the screenwriter in the greater process of the production media. Each student will participate in the various creative steps involved in bringing a narrative script to the screen.

SAC 440 / AAS 440. African Cinema
AAS 200. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A critical and interdisciplinary look at the development of African cinema from its inception in the 1960s, at the height of the sociopolitical upheavals experienced by many nations in the transition from colonialism to independence, to the recent phase of introspection and diversification.

SAC 441. National Screens
SAC 230 or 236 or 360. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

An in-depth exploration of the evolution and forms of specific national or regional cinema in terms of its stylistic, socio-political, economic, and technological dimensions. Close study of the development of a cinema (e.g. Japanese, Eastern European, British) or of a film movement, e.g., Italian Neorealism, German Expressionism, French New Wave.

SAC 451 / AMCULT 490. American Film Genres
Junior standing. (4). May not be repeated for credit. W.

The development of American film genres as a popular art form, considered within the broad context of American cultural development since the late nineteenth century.

SAC 455. Topics in Film Studies
SAC 230 or 236. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Studies in various film topics, such as silent film, women and film, German Expressionism, and Latin-American film.

SAC 458 / ASIAN 458. Film Culture in Korea
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore the history of Korean cinema through the framework of national/transnational cinema discourse, auteur/genre theory, globalization, the division system, and the problem of nation/state which evokes the question of identity. Students will learn Korean cinema through key films, directors, and dominant genres.

SAC 461 / WOMENSTD 461. Explorations in Feminist Film Theory
WOMENSTD 240 or AMCULT 240; and junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an in-depth exploration of feminist theories that address film in relation to gender. Discussion focuses on contemporary feminist scholarship that draws upon a variety of viewpoints, including psychoanalysis, cultural theory, postmodernism, historical research and ideological theory.

SAC 485. The Global Screen
Junior or Above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Junior standing; SAC 230 or 236. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Explores the impact of global trade and cultural exchange on audiovisual media during different periods in media history. Topics rotate. Possible topics include international film co-productions, censorship and state regulation, the transnational transmission of television, and translation and the politics of reception.

SAC 500. Directed Study in Screen Arts and Cultures
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

SAC 600. Introduction to Screen Cultures: Research and Materials
Graduate standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the critical vocabulary, scholarly concerns, and research/writing methodologies of film, television, and digital media studies.

SAC 601. Seminar in Theories of Film or Electronic/Digital Media
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

An examination of a specific issue of concern to film or electronic/digital media theory. Instead of surveying the field of classical and contemporary theory, this course will focus on a specific subject to explore the theories it has generated and how their resulting methods of analysis have informed the study of this aspect of media.

SAC 602. Seminar in Film or Electronic/Digital Media Historiography
Graduate standing. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

An examination of the process and progress of historical research and writing in film or television. This seminar will use several specific productive "problems" as the focus or case study for considering diverse methods relied upon by historians in conceptualizing processes of determination and historical causality in relation to production and reception.

SAC 603. Seminar in Material Practices
Graduate standing and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course fosters a critical and historical understanding of the production cultures of the film, television, and digital imaging industries. It assumes that critical comprehension of screen aesthetics and cultures is inextricably linked to the knowledge of material practices (social, economic, industrial, intellectual) that inform the use of technologies of moving image capture, manipulation and display and the strategies linked to the development, production, and dissemination of film, television, and digital images.

SAC 620. Seminar in Film or Electronic/Digital Media and Culture
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course investigates the interrelation of film or electronic/digital media and a set of cultural practices and/or cultural forms. The specific subject could focus on either a synchronic or diachronic study of such practices and forms; it also could either be restricted to a particular culture, country, or region or else involve a fronfrontation between one or more cultures, countries, or regions.

SAC 622. Seminar in Transnational Film or Electronic/Digital Media
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

There is a growing worldwide interest in media that visualize experience of global diasporas. Films and television programs about migrant populations force one to rethink the notion of "national cinema" and local versus global. This seminar explores how experience of migration, dislocation, or exile are represented in world cinema and media.

SAC 631. Advanced Seminar in Theories of Film or Electronic/Digital Media
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course will concentrate on a contemporary theoretical methodology (or related set of methodologies) germane to the disciplines of Film and Electronic/Digital Media Studies. It will explore the epistemology, discursive organization, and research productiveness of the methodology as well as raise the question of what theory can reveal about cinema and/or a new media and what they, in turn, can reveal about theory.

SAC 632. Advanced Seminar in Film or Electronic/Digital Media History
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course will concentrate on specific historiographical problematic (or set of questions) pertaining to the disciplines of Film and Television History. The specific subject will vary from term to term and could include a particular historical period, a major moment of historical change, the question of periodization, or transnational frameworks of interpretation, interdisciplinary research on media audiences.

SAC 700. Directed Research
Consent of instructor required. SAC 600 and 601, permission of advisor and SAC Graduate Committee. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Each student will carry out a research project in screen cultures that represent the culmination of her or his graduate work. Based on individual reading and screening lists, this written project normally will serve as a preliminary stage of the student?s dissertation.

SAC 990. Dissertation/Precandidate
Consent of instructor required. Graduate standing. (1 - 8; 1 - 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

SAC 995. Dissertation/Candidate
Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. Consent of instructor required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8; 4 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 48 credits. This course has a grading basis of "S" or "U".

N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

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