Undergraduate Course Catalog
Effective Term
Requirement or Grouping
Listings Per Page
Subject
  or   Department
Show Descriptions Show Course Guide Term Links For Past Two Years
Note: For descriptions of classes each term, see the LSA Course Guide
   Page 1 of 1, Results 1 - 118 of 118   
Courses in LSA Anthropology
Anthropology is a field of study that deals with both the biological and cultural aspects of humanity. Its basic concerns include the organic evolution of the human species; the origin, development, and integration of customs, techniques, social relationships, and beliefs that define a way of life (or culture) of human social groups; and the interrelations among these biological and cultural factors in human behavior. The subject matter of anthropology is divided into four major areas of study: Anthropological Archaeology (ANTHRARC), Biological Anthropology (ANTHRBIO), Linguistic Anthropology, and Sociocultural Anthropology (ANTHRCUL).

Biological Anthropology considers human evolutionary history, the causes of present genetic diversity, and biological aspects of human behavior. It uses the evidence and concepts of paleontology, primate studies, population genetics, growth and nutrition, and ecology.

Anthropological Archaeology seeks to understand human behavior in the past, by examining the remains of human activity (such as settlements, tools, pottery) that have survived from earlier times. Through the analysis of material remains, archaeologists explore the cultural forms and social organization of human societies over the longest possible time span.

Sociocultural Anthropology describes, analyzes, and compares the widest possible range of human cultures and social institutions, with emphasis on the present day. While some sociocultural anthropologists concentrate on societies that differ from our own in scale or cultural history and way of life, others examine contemporary European and American societies with the wider perspective gained from looking at other cultures and societies.

Linguistic Anthropology views language as one of the most distinctive characteristics of human beings. It studies language in the context of human evolution, social relationships, and cultural forms, and it explores the role of languages and ways of speaking in cultural difference and social action.

Roster of Anthropology courses, by subgroup

  • Biological Anthropology: ANTHRBIO 161, 168, 169, 297, 351, 360, 361, 362, 364, 365, 366, 368, 450, 451, 452, 460, 461, 462, 464, 465, 467, 468, 469, 470, 472, 473, 474, 475, 477, 478, 479
  • Anthropological Archaeology: ANTHRARC 180, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 292, 296, 380, 381, 382, 383, 385, 386, 388, 390, 394, 407, 442, 481, 482, 483, 484, 485, 486, 488, 489, 490, 491, 492, 493, 495
  • Cultural Anthropology
    • Introductory Courses: ANTHRCUL 101, 158, 222, 225, 226, 256, 272, 298, 299
    • Sociocultural Anthropology  —  Regional Courses: ANTHRCUL 202, 302, 305, 306, 309, 314, 315, 317, 319, 320, 323, 324, 346, 402, 403, 404, 405, 409, 410, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 417, 421, 422, 423
    • Sociocultural Anthropology  —  Theory/Method: ANTHRCUL 230, 327, 330, 331, 447, 532
    • Sociocultural Anthropology  —  Topical Courses: ANTHRCUL 212, 232, 234, 246, 260, 310, 325, 326, 329, 332, 333, 334, 335, 336, 338, 339, 344, 345, 347, 349, 352, 355, 356, 357, 408, 416, 425, 427, 428, 429, 431, 436, 438, 439, 440, 445, 446. 450, 451, 453, 455, 457, 458, 459, 461, 462
    • Linguistic Anthropology: ANTHRCUL 272, 277, 299, 370, 371, 372, 373, 374, 375, 461, 464, 473, 474, 475, 477
  • Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses
    • ANTHRARC 258, 392, 398, 399, 400, 401, 480, 487, 494, 496, 497, 499
    • ANTHRBIO 371, 398, 399, 463, 471
    • ANTHRCUL 258, 300, 301, 398, 399, 499

 

Anthropology, Archaeological (ANTHRARC)
ANTHRARC 180. First-Year Seminar in Anthropological Archaeology
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

A small seminar designed to introduce first-year students to the theory and practice of anthropological archaeology. This will be accomplished by discussing topics of current interest to anthropology faculty who are conducting original research in archaeology. Emphasis will be on understanding how prehistoric material remains inform us about the economy, polity, and cosmology of ancient societies.

ANTHRARC 282. Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Basic principles and methods of archaeological research. Survey of prehistoric cultures in the Eastern and Western hemispheres from earliest times to the rise of high civilization.

ANTHRARC 284. Aztec, Maya, and Inca Civilizations
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the rise and fall of the ancient civilizations of Latin America. Two major goals of the course are to expose undergraduates to an anthropological perspective and to a comparative perspective.

ANTHRARC 285. Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Examines the prehistory and contact periods of the New World from the perspective of critical thinking, ethics, and racism. It evaluates each claim to explain cultural achievements - art, architecture, agriculture, etc. - on a case by case basis to demonstrate the accomplishments of Indians.

ANTHRARC 296. Topics in Archaeology
(3). (SS). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

The course covers a topic in archaeology in depth. The topic varies from term to term.

ANTHRARC 381 / ACABS 382 / HISTART 382. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from c. 3200 BCE-285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes are explored, and specific sites, some well known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids).

ANTHRARC 382. European Prehistory
(3; 2 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of human cultures in Europe from the earliest evidence of occupation to the Roman conquest of Gaul. Major themes include the emergence of human culture during the Ice Age, the introduction of food-producing economies and village life, and the development of complex societies, metallurgy, trade, and warfare.

ANTHRARC 383. Prehistory: Africans
Sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

A functional and evolutionary examination of extinct cultural systems of Africa from the first appearance of cultural remains until circa A.D. 1600. Sub-Saharan Africa is emphasized.

ANTHRARC 384 / ACABS 324. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture
Sophomore standing. (4; 3 in the half-term). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

Sumerian, Babylonian, and Assyrian civilization from the first cuneiform documents to the fall of the Neo-Babylonian empire; special attention to (1) the rise and nature of early Mesopotamian city-states; (2) Mesopotamian economics; (3) Mesopotamian law; (4) ethnic relations in Mesopotamia; (5) Mesopotamia and its neighbors - Egypt, Iran, Israel; (6) the collapse of Mesopotamian civilization.

ANTHRARC 385. The Archaeology of Early Humans
Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Survey of evidence for the origins and evolution of stone age human cultures from the earliest sites in Africa (2 million years ago) to the origins of agriculture (10,000 years ago); discussion of techniques and methods used to identify and interpret ancient human cultures prior to the advent of civilization.

ANTHRARC 386. Early Civilizations
Sophomore standing. (4; 2 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers the long term development of pre-Columbian American civilization with particular focus on Mesoamerica and the central Andes. The major emphasis is on recent archaeological research which has illuminated the development of prehistoric chiefdoms, states, and empires.

ANTHRARC 392. Archaeology Underwater
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers the techniques and potentials of underwater archaeology. Topics range from the technical questions of how to conduct normal archaeological activities such as site survey and excavation in the underwater environment, through to a review of the varied applications of underwater archaeology on both shipwrecks and ancient inundated sites.

ANTHRARC 394. Undergraduate Seminar in Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. ANTHRARC 282; and concentration in Anthropology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Examination of the development of prehistoric and anthropological archaeology through readings and discussions of traditional research problems, outstanding site reports, and the works of major contributions to the field.

ANTHRARC 398. Honors in Anthropological Archaeology
Senior standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

ANTHRARC 399. Honors in Anthropological Archaeology
Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. W.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

ANTHRARC 407. Archaeology of South Asia
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Provides an overview of South Asian Archaeology from the earliest evidence for hominids at c. 1.5 million years ago through the emergence of early historic states and empires. Discusses major cultural transitions and important sites in several regions of South Asia, in the context of the history of archaeological research in this area.

ANTHRARC 480. Practica in Archaeological Research Techniques
Juniors and above or permission of instructor. (1 - 3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course provides students with theoretical background and hands-on experience in the documentation and analysis of a range of archaeological remains. The course is subdivided into units or sections, focusing on some combination of the following: the analysis of ceramics, lithics, fauna, botanical remains, soils, archaeological photography, mapping, and drafting.

ANTHRARC 482. Topics in Anthropological Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. Junior standing. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course will cover in-depth topics in anthropological archaeology. The topics covered will vary from term to term. Students should consult the time schedule for the focus in any given term.

ANTHRARC 483. Near Eastern Prehistory
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Area survey course on the archaeology of Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Syria, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran, from the Lower Paleolithic to the beginnings of Sumerian civilization.

ANTHRARC 487. UM Training Program in Archaeology
(6). May not be repeated for credit. May not be used toward the Anthropology academic minors.

Provides undergraduate and graduate students with training in excavation, survey, and artifact analysis, while participating in ongoing research. The sites excavated are all Native American in origin. All lectures and mush of the training related to artifact and site interpretation stress Native American life ways, symbolic and religious values, etc.

ANTHRARC 490. Prehistory of North America
Sophomore & above/permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The growth of prehistoric American Indian cultures from the Arctic to the Rio Grande.

ANTHRARC 494. Introduction to Analytical Methods in Archaeology
Consent of instructor required. One course in statistics and junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the major methods of statistical analysis used in archaeological research.

ANTHRARC 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. May not be used toward the Anthropology academic minors.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in Anthropology.

Anthropology, Biological (ANTHRBIO)
ANTHRBIO 161. Introduction to Biological Anthropology
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward requirements for the Anthropology major. F, W, Su.

Study of human evolution with emphasis on genetic evolutionary process. Man's evolutionary history as evidenced by fossil remains and present racial variation in light of modern evolutionary theory.

ANTHRBIO 166. First Year Seminar: Searching for Human Origins
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Until recently, discussions of human origins have been confined to mythological, philosophical and theological speculation. The modern synthesis of evolutionary biology (or simply "evolutionary theory") and discovery of human fossils have provided a conceptual framework in which we can now begin to critically examine the process that has led to modern humans.

ANTHRBIO 169. Natural Selection
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is a first-year seminar in which students learn the progress in natural selection theory since Darwin. We will ask: Why is natural selection considered the principle guiding force of evolution? What is the evidence for natural selection? In humans? In nonhumans? Does the notion of "selfish genes" have any relevance to human behavior? How can behavior be adaptive yet not have any basis in genetic differences among individuals? Why does natural selection often favor "flexible" as opposed to "innate" responses? What roles are played by culture, learning, and development?

ANTHRBIO 297. Topics in Biological Anthropology
(3). (NS). (BS). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course will cover a topic in biological anthropology in depth. The topic will vary from term to term.

ANTHRBIO 342 / ANTHRCUL 342. Nature/Culture Now!
ANTHRCUL 101. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course, co-taught by a biological and a cultural anthropologist, investigates the ongoing power of the nature/culture divide and examines anthropology's central role in formulating the nature/culture dichotomy itself. The course is broken down into four sections including, a history of nature/culture in anthropology, race, sex, and health and disease.

ANTHRBIO 363. Genes, Disease, and Culture
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course is an introduction to genes, disease, and culture. Students will be exposed to a wide range of topics including the adaptive aspects of genetic disease, cultural selection, biological and environmental determinism, gene-culture co-evolution, and niche construction theory.

ANTHRBIO 364. Nutrition and Evolution
Sophomore standing. (4; 3 in the half-term). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Study of the evolutionary basis of contemporary nutritional patterns, the short and long-term effects of industrialization on human biology during development and adulthood.

ANTHRBIO 365. Human Evolution
Sophomore or Junior or Senior. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) High school biology is assumed. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRBIO 366. Human Evolutionary Anatomy
ANTHRBIO 161. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the evolutionary history of humans through the study of comparative human anatomy. It focuses on the musculoskeletal anatomy of humans and their closest living and fossil relatives. It also includes the reconstruction of dietary, locomotor, and social behavior of Australopithecus and earlier forms of Homo.

ANTHRBIO 368 / PSYCH 338. Primate Social Behavior I
(4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course describes and explains primate societies and is first in a sequence of two. The course investigates sex, aggression, cooperation, social development and group structure.

ANTHRBIO 371. Techniques in Biological Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (BS). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May not be included in a concentration plan in Anthropology.

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

ANTHRBIO 398. Honors in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology
Seniors Only. Consent of instructor required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of ANTHRBIO 399, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F.

Seniors enrolled in the Honors program conduct a research project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Students receive help with planning, conducting, and writing up the results of their research.

ANTHRBIO 399. Honors in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology
Seniors Only. Consent of instructor required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Senior standing. (3). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. W.

Seniors enrolled in the Honors program conduct a research project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Students receive help with planning, conducting, and writing up the results of their research.

ANTHRBIO 450. Molecular Anthropology
ANTHRBIO 161 and 363. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an advanced introduction to Molecular Anthropology. It introduces ways in which molecular data is analyzed and then used to answer questions concerning human evolutionary history. Students will learn principles of molecular evolution and how to apply these principles to human and non-human primate DNA and protein sequence data.

ANTHRBIO 465. Primate Functional Anatomy
ANTHRBIO 351, 365, 368 or 477. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course introduces students to the evolutionary history of the primate radiation, particularly the evolution of monkeys, apes and humans, through an analysis of primate anatomy. The focus will be on the postcranial musculoskeletal anatomy of extant and fossil primates and reconstruction of the behavior of extinct forms.

ANTHRBIO 467. Human Behavioral Ecology
A strong background in the natural sciences is assumed, including any two of the following courses: ANTHRBIO 161, 368; BIOLOGY 162, 171, 172; MCDB 404; EEB 494. (4; 3 in the half-term). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers the anthropological significance of recent advances in natural selection theory. Students will read the primary scientific literature to learn how anthropologists test evolutionary hypotheses about human behavior.

ANTHRBIO 469. Topics in Biological Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. (2 - 4; 2 - 3 in the half-term). (BS). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

ANTHRBIO 471. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

ANTHRBIO 472. Human Nature
Consent of instructor required. ANTHRBIO 467. (2). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an advanced seminar in evolutionary psychology. Topics include: sexual selection, mating systems theory, parental investment, reciprocity, morality, and religion.

ANTHRBIO 474. Hominid Origins
ANTHRBIO 365. (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is about the origin of the human species and the adaptations and life history of the earliest human ancestors before Homo. It examines the ancestry of the hominids, the various theories of their origin, and aspects of australopithecine evolution such as their history, locomotion, behavior, adaptations, and taxonomy.

ANTHRBIO 475. Evolution of Genus Homo
ANTHRBIO 351 or 365. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Evolution of the genus Homo from H erectus to modern human populations. Topics include origin and dispersal of Homo erectus, appearance and evolution of early H. sapiens, Neanderthal, and modern humans.

ANTHRBIO 478. Primate Behavioral Ecology
Consent of instructor required. ANTHRBIO 368. (3). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

This advanced undergraduate/graduate course examines the ecology and behavior of non-human primates. Using mainly primary research articles, we explore several themes in primate behavioral ecology including reproductive strategies, sexual selection, behavioral endocrinology, cooperation and conflict, cultural transmission, and primate cognition.

Anthropology, Cultural (ANTHRCUL)
ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Does not count toward requirements for the Anthropology major. F, W, Sp.

A survey of the fundamental concepts and perspectives of anthropology with an emphasis on sociocultural anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Anthropology
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in an Anthropology major.

A small seminar designed to introduce entering students to the discipline of Anthropology, its history, and to the concept of "culture," which is at the heart of anthropological research methods and theories. Students will develop analytical and intellectual skills that will help them understand and negotiate the complex world we live in, and to become familiar with the evolutionary processes responsible for humans in all their diversity.

ANTHRCUL 202. Ethnic Diversity in Japan
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the history and cultures of Japanese ethnic groups and minorities. Among the groups we will focus on are the ("aboriginal") Ainu, resident Koreans, migrant workers (of Japanese ancestry) from S. American, children of mixed parentage, etc. Japanese expressions and ideologies of "race" and ethnicity" are also analyzed comparatively. Anthropological readings are augmented by novels and short stories, comics, videos and films.

ANTHRCUL 209 / HISTART 290. Ethnicity and Art in Japan
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This multimedia course on Japan explores how "race" and ethnicity are defined and given artistic, including musical, expression by a variety of groups past and present.

ANTHRCUL 212 / NURS 225 / WOMENSTD 212. The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. Provides basic information about the history, biology, politics, and culture of AIDS, surveys the current state of the epidemic in different parts of the globe, and describes how the epidemic has been shaped by gender, poverty, and other structures of social inequality.

ANTHRCUL 222. The Comparative Study of Cultures
(4; 2 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

A selective survey of ways of life in both the Eastern and Western hemispheres describing and analyzing the technology, economic and social organization, religion, and arts of specific peoples.

ANTHRCUL 226 / HISTORY 229. Introduction to Historical Anthropology
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed to examine the ways in which people in different societies and at different times have understood the past and have used history to assign meaning to past events. A variety of different systems, programs, and practices for maintaining and deploying knowledge of the past will be explored, including monuments, commemorations and memorials, oral materials and tradition, museums and exhibitions, personal memoirs, film, photography, and literature. Particular attention will be given to the latency of powerful formations seated in understandings of race, gender, ethnicity, and nation.

ANTHRCUL 234. Anthropology and Development
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The class examines what "development" means from a range of perspectives, including those of community members, anthropologists, and development professionals. The goal is to understand how their different attitudes, beliefs, and political concerns affect how development projects are implemented and interpreted.

ANTHRCUL 246 / RELIGION 246. Anthropology of Religion
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to basic problems faced by religions and by the study of religion. Draws on case studies from around the world to examine how people confront questions of life, death, evil, misfortune, and power. Also asks how the study of religion wrestles with relations between tolerance and faith.

ANTHRCUL 250. Anthropology of Rock and Roll
ANTHRCUL 101. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course uses the framework of popular music (e.g. rock and roll, hip-hop, and country) to introduce some core issues in sociocultural anthropology (e.g. racism, sexism, and violence). Students will have an in-depth look at the dialectical relationship between social trends and music, production techniques, and performance.

ANTHRCUL 256 / ENVIRON 256. Culture, Adaptation, and Environment
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores anthropological approaches to human relationships with their environments and resources. Examines diverse conceptions of culture and nature, and time and space, and the impacts that contemporary global forces are having on indigenous societies and their ecosystems. Particular interest to relative strengths and weaknesses of materialistic and cultural analyses of human-environment relationship, and models that attempt to combine them.

ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Anthropology
LSA Honors. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Honors students with sophomore standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A small seminar designed to introduce Honors students to the discipline of Anthropology, its history, and to the concept of "culture," which is at the heart of anthropological research methods and theories. Students will develop analytical and intellectual skills that will help them understand and negotiate the complex world we live in, and to become familiar with the evolutionary processes responsible for humans in all their diversity.

ANTHRCUL 260. Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
ANTHRCUL 101. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides a general introduction to the theories, concepts, and methodologies in the study of folklore, especially with attention to the application of anthropological and cultural theories to expressive forms.

ANTHRCUL 272 / LING 272. Language in Society
Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Primarily for first- and second-year students. W.

An introduction to the systematic study of language and of the place of language in society. Origins of language in the species, child language, language and thought, meaning and language and social class.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
(3). (SS). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course covers a topic in sociocultural anthropology in depth. The topic will vary from term to term.

ANTHRCUL 299. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology
(3). (SS). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

Course will cover a topic in linguistic anthropology in depth. The topic will vary from term to term.

ANTHRCUL 300. Doing Ethnography in Havana and in Cuba
Consent of instructor required. Spanish language and background required. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. W in Cuba.

Readings, lectures, site visits within Havana, and organized travel to major provincial cities, including Matanzas, Santa Clara, Cienfuegos, and Santiago de Cuba, are carefully integrated to provide students with an ethnographic lens through which to understand history, culture, ethnicity, religion, and politics in urban Havana and the island of Cuba.

ANTHRCUL 301. The Ethnographer's Craft
Consent of instructor required. Spanish language background required. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

This course considers the history, politics, and possibilities of the ethnographer's craft, focusing on ethnographic writing, ethnographic photography, and ethnographic film. The aim is for students to learn about the ethnographer's craft through lectures and readings, and by embarking on ethnographic projects under the supervision of the professor.

ANTHRCUL 302 / HISTART 302 / WOMENSTD 302. Sex and Gender in Japan
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Explore attribution and construction of gender in Japan historically and in the present time.

ANTHRCUL 309. Anthropology of Europe
Sophomore standing; introductory anthropology recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The course considers contemporary European communities, identities, politics and habits through the lens of mid- to late-20th century anthropological studies. We will read and discuss ethnographies about cultural aspects of everyday life in Greece, Spain, Italy, Portugal, France, Norway, Germany and Great Britain in an effort to contextualize country-specific studies and to make sense of such broader processes as globalization, postcolonialsm, tourism, European integration, race/ethnic consciousness and racism.

ANTHRCUL 310. The State in Africa
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Much talk about African states lumps them together as 'failed,' 'weak,' or 'fragile'. Rather than focus on what specific African states are not, this course aims to identify what they are, how they operate, and how individuals acting on behalf of or in the name of the state negotiate varying degrees of legitimacy.

ANTHRCUL 314 / AMCULT 313 / LATINOAM 313. Cuba and its Diaspora
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. F.

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States Diaspora. Through political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, and visual art, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for thirty-five years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile.

ANTHRCUL 315 / AMCULT 316 / NATIVEAM 316. Native American Peoples of North America
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Survey of typical Native American cultures with a special topical focus on religion, world view, and social organization.

ANTHRCUL 317 / REEES 397. Communism and Capitalism in Eastern Europe
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REEES 396 or SLAVIC 396 or POLSCI 396 or HISTORY 333 or SOC 393. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor.

An overview of East Central Europe from 1945 to the present. The first half of the course explores the workings of state socialism from an anthropological perspective (with particular focus on political economy and material culture) from the Stalinist 1950s to the more diversified decades of the 1960s to 1980s. The second half covers the "revolutions" of 1989 and contemporary social, cultural, economic and political processes, including struggles over membership to the E.U.

ANTHRCUL 319. Latin American Society and Culture
(4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

A multi-disciplinary, contextual introduction to the study of Latin American culture, society and politics. Faculty are drawn from Political Science, Romance Languages, History, Anthropology, and Geography, among others. Students are introduced to Latin America in its historical perspective.

ANTHRCUL 320. Mexico: Culture and Society
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will look at Mexican culture and society. In particular, it will address the question of how culture and national identity in Mexico have been historically and socially constructed over the past century.

ANTHRCUL 325 / WOMENSTD 324. Childbirth & Culture
Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on the distinctive sociocultural configurations of childbirth practices and beliefs in several different societies. The cross-cultural study of childbirth provides a basis for understanding the cultural logic underlying these practices and beliefs and expands our knowledge of women's perspectives on social change and the medicalization of childbirth.

ANTHRCUL 327 / RCSSCI 327 / WOMENSTD 307. Critical Theory in Medicine and Healing
One course in ANTHRCUL or RCSSCI or WOMENSTD 240 or WOMENSTD with an SS designation. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the critical anthropological analysis of illness, health, healing, and medicine. We explore current and past medical anthropological approaches--political economic, phenomenological, symbolic, feminist, post-structural--in order to evaluate how well these frameworks convey the lived experience of bodies in their local worlds.

ANTHRCUL 328. Globalizing Consumer Cultures
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course presents an anthropological perspective on consumer culture. Topics include: classic oppositions between gift exchanges vs. commodity societies; analyses of advertising, branding and retail; and ethnographic descriptions of increasingly commodified lives in places as far flung as Hungary, India, Argentina, England, Sweden and Nepal as well as in the U.S.

ANTHRCUL 330. Culture, Thought, and Meaning
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 331. Kinship, Social Organization, and Society
One course in Anthropology. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces core problems in social anthropology, centering on how the organization of societies affects the lives and experiences of those who live in them. We examine anthropological approaches to social relationships, broadly defined, both historically and across the field of anthropology today.

ANTHRCUL 333. Non-Western Legal Systems, I
Sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. F.

Comparative cross-cultural analysis and discussion of the nature and attributes of law in non-Western cultures. The relationship between law and social structure, customs, morality, religion, politics, and government, including case studies of the judicial processes and dispute settlement.

ANTHRCUL 342 / ANTHRBIO 342. Nature/Culture Now!
ANTHRCUL 101. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course, co-taught by a biological and a cultural anthropologist, investigates the ongoing power of the nature/culture divide and examines anthropology's central role in formulating the nature/culture dichotomy itself. The course is broken down into four sections including, a history of nature/culture in anthropology, race, sex, and health and disease.

ANTHRCUL 344. Medical Anthropology
ANTHRCUL 101 or 222; or sophomore and above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The concepts of "health" and "illness" are culturally constructed. This course examines beliefs about these states of being, and the ways in which they are both products and illustrations of the larger social system in which they are found. Ideas about the history of disease, social construction of the body, illness causation, therapies and therapists, healing symbols and rituals, and the social roles of patients and healers are explored. In addition to examining these beliefs and processes cross-culturally, we also draw upon examples form Western biomedicine--among them cancer, AIDS, eating disorder, schizophrenia--to illustrate the powerful ways in which illness and culture are bound together.

ANTHRCUL 345. Cultural Anthropology Mini-Course
(1 - 2). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course will cover special topics in cultural anthropology. Topics will vary from term to term. Students should consult the schedule of classes for the focus in any given term. This course is offered as a seven-week mini-course.

ANTHRCUL 346 / HISTORY 347. Latin America: The Colonial Period
(4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, and on the emergence of a durable colonial system.

ANTHRCUL 347 / AAS 420. Race and Ethnicity
Junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

A comparative analysis of race and ethnicity as social and political phenomena with emphasis on the current theoretical literature; criteria by which different peoples classify races and/or ethnic groups; the implications of those classifications for inter-group relations and the of how attitude and values surrounding race and ethnicity have shaped contemporary world events.

ANTHRCUL 349. Indigenous Political Movements
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This seminar examines contemporary indigenous political movements, including definitions and histories, politics of culture, legal treatment, significance of place, nongovernmental organizations, social movement theory, and their intersection with global environmentalism. Geographical focus on Latin America, the Pacific, and Southeast Asia.

ANTHRCUL 352. Anthropology of the Body
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Approaches to the study of embodied experience. Themes include: some classic theories that offer different ways of thinking about and "with" the body; the cultural and historical constitution of bodies, particularly their differentiation from bodily "others"; and transformations of bodily experience via contemporary mass media, commodities, and globalization.

ANTHRCUL 354 / HISTART 354. Art, Science, and Technology
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This multimedia, interdisciplinary seminar is devoted to exploring the global history and present-day expressions of the relationship between art, science, and technology, and how they are integrated. To this end we will cultivate both a new visual literacy and a new literacy in science and technology.

ANTHRCUL 355 / AAS 355 / HISTORY 355. Health and Illness in African Worlds
(4; 3 in the half-term). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Changes in disease, epidemiology, and health and healing practices in African continental and Atlantic worlds from the fifteenth century, as Africans encountered new forms of medicine, slavery, colonialism, epidemic, famine, and war. Designed for concentrators in History and Afroamerican and African Studies and/or students seeking careers in medicine, public health, and medical anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 356. Topics in Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTHRCUL 101. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Course covers in-depth topics in Sociocultural Anthropology. Topics vary from term to term.

ANTHRCUL 357. Seminar in Sociocultural Anthropology
A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Readings, discussions, and reports on problems in modern sociocultural anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 370 / LING 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
(3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the role of language as social statement and social conflict, particularly with respect to questions of race and ethnicity. It looks at issues concerning language-based discrimination in various public and private contexts and at beliefs about language and language variation.

ANTHRCUL 374 / LING 374. Language and Culture
Sophomore standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The study of the ways various cultural patterns and values are reflected in language.

ANTHRCUL 375 / LING 362. Talking and Telling
One course in linguistics, anthropology, or a related field. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Talking and Telling introduces students to the analysis of face-to-face interaction including both the systematic study of conversations as well as telling stories.

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology
Seniors Only. Consent of instructor required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of ANTHRCUL 399, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F.

This honors course is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in sociocultural or linguistic anthropology and have applied for senior honors in the Department of Anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology
Senior standing. Consent of instructor required. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. W.

This honors course is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in sociocultural or linguistic anthropology and have applied for senior honors in the Department of Anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 402. Chinese Society and Cultures
Junior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Description and interpretation of the agrarian aspect of Chinese civilization, treating such topics as traditional family and village organization, class structure and modern changes.

ANTHRCUL 408 / AAS 409. Maternal/Child Health and Environmental Pollution in Africa
Junior or above. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course focuses on the effects of the environment and environmental pollution on the health of women and children in several sub-Saharan African countries. Selected readings in medical anthropological, public health, and environmental pollution as well as films examining connections between health, environmental factors, culture, and development are examined.

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa
Junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 411 / AAS 422. African Cultures
AAS 200 (CAAS 200); and junior standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. The course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa.

ANTHRCUL 414 / AAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I
Junior standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean with emphasis on Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Guyana. Analysis of class, race relations, cultural pluralism, ethnicity, population movements, and economic development.

ANTHRCUL 416 / HBEHED 516. Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 423. Anthropology in Melanesia: History and Contemporary Developments
ANTHRCUL 101 or 222. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

Anthropological research in Melanesia has played a significant role in the history of the discipline, from Malinowski?s early work in the Trobriand Islands to the scholarship of the 1970s and 1980s. The first half of the course considers anthropological contributions to long-standing debates about magic, sorcery, ritual, exchange, social relations, and gender. The second half examines the more recent generation of ethnographies that addresses the state, modernization, and processes of globalization, including Melanesian engagements with mining companies, commodities, Christianity, and NGOs.

ANTHRCUL 428 / RCSSCI 428 / WOMENSTD 428. Sex Panics in the US and UK since 1890
One course in WOMENSTD or ANTHRCUL or RCSSCI, SOC, or HISTORY. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the paradigm of "sex panics" and examines several case studies, including anti-prostitution movements in Britain and the US, progressive era conflicts over age of consent, female sexual precocity and juvenile justice in the US, the eruption of concern over sexual psychopaths in the 1930s-1950s, and anti-homosexual crusades in the 1940s and 1950s. The lingering legacies of these conflicts and their imprint on more contemporary conflicts will be explored.

ANTHRCUL 437. The Anthropology of Death, Dying and the Afterlife
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the ways that death, dying and the afterlife are practiced and imagined in different places and times, drawing on the anthropology of religion, political anthropology, and medical anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development
Junior standing or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 440. Cultural Adaptation
Junior standing or above. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to ecological anthropology and the evolutionary adaptation of cultures, origins of cultural diversity, and cultural adaptation and maladaptation.

ANTHRCUL 445. Cultural Anthropology Mini-Course
Junior Standing and above, or permission of instructor. (1 - 2). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course covers special topics in cultural anthropology. Topics covered vary by term. Students should consult the schedule of classes for the focus in any given term. This course is offered as a seven-week mini-course.

ANTHRCUL 446 / WOMENSTD 446. Sex and the City: Urban Geography and Sexual Locations
At least one course in Anthropology, History, Women's Studies, Sociology, LGBTQ Studies, or Urban Studies/Urban Planning. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines contemporary sexual diversity in the context of urban geography, urban studies, and the political economies of sexuality and space. It addresses issues of the spatial locations of sexual populations and situates the formation and disappearance of sexual neighborhoods and territories in terms of the larger dynamics of urban life. Topics include relationships between urban size to sexual specialization, impact of redevelopment and gentrification on the texture of urban neighborhoods, and specific studies of red light districts, prostitution, and homosexuality.

ANTHRCUL 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 450. Anthropologies of Insurgency: Bandits, Rebels and Freedom Fighters
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the interlinked categories of rebel, bandit, and freedom fighter to understand insurgency from an anthropological viewpoint. Privileging sociological and micropolitical analysis, the course approaches specific instances of illegal use of force in their sociocultural and historic settings, and builds toward a consideration of insurgency from "the actors' points of view".

ANTHRCUL 451 / AAS 459. African-American Religion
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 453 / AAS 454. African-American Culture
One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Sociocultural and Linguistic Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. Junior and above. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Course covers various in-depth topics in sociocultural or linguistic. Topics covered vary from term to term. Consult the Time Schedule for the focus in any given term.

ANTHRCUL 461 / AMCULT 461 / LING 461 / NATIVEAM 461. Language, Culture, and Society in Native North America
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore how Native North American languages are used in relation to the historical circumstances, cultural practices and social settings of their speakers. Of particular concern is the interrelationship between linguistic practice and ideologies that can either promote or discourage the use (and maintenance) of these languages.

ANTHRCUL 473 / LING 473. Ethnopoetics: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Verbal Art
Two courses in anthropology, linguistics, or literature or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores relationships between language and social groupings such as "tribe", "ethnic group' and "nation". Are such groupings based on shared language? Through cross-cultural case studies and historical materials, we consider how linguistic similarities and differences unite or divide people, in practice and in ideology.

ANTHRCUL 474. Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores relationships between language and social groupings such as "tribe", "ethnic group' and "nation". Are such groupings based on shared language? Through cross-cultural case studies and historical materials, we consider how linguistic similarities and differences unite or divide people, in practice and in ideology.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in Anthropology. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

ANTHRCUL 519 / GERMAN 517 / LING 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography
400-level coursework in Anthropology, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices.

ANTHRCUL 572 / LING 542. Introduction to Sociolinguistics
LING 411 or graduate standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

The class will discuss such relationships between language and society and how they might be studied objectively. We will focus on issues directly affecting a person's everyday life, such as attitudes towards different languages and dialects and historical and social reasons for these attitudes; questions about why different groups of speakers in the same society use language differently and how this difference is evaluated; use of minority languages whose survival seems to be threatened and governments' language policies.

College of Literature, Science, and the Arts 500 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI  48109 © 2012 Regents of the University of Michigan