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Courses in LSA Classical Studies

The Department of Classical Studies is concerned with every aspect of the worlds of the ancient Greeks and Romans – their languages and literatures, art and material cultures, philosophy, history, daily life, law and justice, political theory, and religion. The works and thoughts of the Greeks and Romans provide focus and historical perspective to questions which are heatedly debated in our time, making this field of study exciting and intellectually engaging. An ideal liberal arts education, Classical Studies is an excellent way to develop analytical abilities, to learn to make careful arguments and express them lucidly as well as come to a solid understanding of some of the greatest monuments of human thought and art.

Courses Taught in English

The department offers a number of Classical Archaeology and Classical Civilization courses which require no knowledge of Greek or Latin. Through lectures and reading in translation, these courses offer students an opportunity to acquire a general knowledge of Greek and Roman archaeology, literature, mythology, religion, sport and daily life, sexuality, law, philosophy, and institutions.

LSA Language Requirement

The LSA language requirement for the A.B./B.S. degree may be satisfied with the successful completion of: MODGREEK 202, both GREEK 301 and 302 (or equivalent); GREEK 307 and 308; GREEK 300 and any upper-level course; LATIN 232 or 295, or any course at the 300- or 400-level which has one of these courses as a prerequisite, or by satisfactory performance on a placement test. The Latin placement test is offered once at the beginning of each term, periodically during each term by arrangement, and throughout the Summer Orientation period. Students are placed into the department’s language sequences according to their demonstrated proficiency.

Intensive Language Courses

The department offers intensive language courses in Latin and Greek which compress the normal two-year sequence required for elementary language proficiency. Intensive courses are available for Latin and Greek, and are offered during Fall and Winter Terms, and during the Spring or Summer Half-Term. For information about intensive Latin and Greek, please contact the department.

Special Departmental Policies

The department requires that a student earn a grade of at least C– in all language courses which are prerequisite for subsequent elections. A student should repeat any language course in which a D+ or lower grade is earned and which serves as a prerequisite to other courses which are to be elected. A grade of D+ signifies some achievement but denotes too weak a foundation for subsequent courses.

Classical Archaeology (CLARCH)
Classical archaeology is the study of the material culture – the artifacts, sites, monuments, and landscapes – of the ancient Mediterranean world. While the civilizations of Greece and Rome tend to be our focus, other areas, notably Egypt and the Near East, also form part of what we study. Classical archeology deals with all periods from the Paleolithic through the Byzantine.

Courses in Classical Archaeology (CLARCH) generally do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

CLARCH 103. Great Discoveries in Archaeology
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to archaeology through the concept of the discovery. We first examine archaeological discoveries in Africa several million years ago and then travel around the world, ending in Michigan. Students learn the primary fields of archaeological research, and also re-evaluate their idea of a "great discovery".

CLARCH 220 / HISTART 220. Great Buildings of Ancient Greece and Rome
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Architecture provides a unique perspective on classical civilization. Buildings such as the Parthenon and the Colosseum are marvels of both engineering and design, and they still have great expressive power. This course introduces students to key monuments of Greek and Roman architecture from prehistoric to early mediaeval times.

CLARCH 221 / HISTART 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. F.

The archaeology of Crete and Greece to the age of Alexander and the contributions made to the history of civilization through excavation.

CLARCH 222 / HISTART 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. W.

CLARCH 223 / CLCIV 223. Greeks and Barbarian
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

In the first millennium BCE, Greek adventurers, traders, colonists, and mercenaries traveled all over the ancient world, from Gibraltar to Afghanistan, from Egypt to the Black Sea. This course offers an archaeological perspective on the interactions between Greeks and non-Greeks and how those experiences helped shape both groups.

CLARCH 323. Introduction to Field Archaeology
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course interprets 'field archaeology' in its widest sense. Lectures will discuss individual techniques (from excavation to computer analysis) and numerous issues (such as the problem with archaeology's 'Indiana Jones' reputation). Students will become aware of the importance of archaeology not only in creating our images of the past, but of the present as well.

CLARCH 327 / CLCIV 327 / HJCS 326 / NEAREAST 355 / RELIGION 326. Jews in the Roman Mediterranean: Archaeology, Religion, and Culture
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

An introductory survey course on the history of the Jews in the Roman and Byzantine worlds, from the arrival of the Romans in the East in the first century BCE through the Arab conquests in the seventh and eighth centuries CE.

CLARCH 350. Topics in Classical Archaeology
CLARCH 221, 222, or 323. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.

This course offers the opportunity to explore various topics in Classical Archaeology such as empire, gender, identity, landscape, memory, political architecture, religion, and urban structures, or to study particular sites or archaeological techniques.

CLARCH 375 / MODGREEK 375. Archaeology & the Public: Archaeology & Heritage in a Globalized World
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Archaeology, ancient objects, and monuments have always fascinated people. Few academic disciplines can claim so many action heroes, movies, computer games...even casinos. What is it about archaeologists and the past that is so attractive? Why bother about the past at all? How do we practice archaeology and talk about the past in a fast-paced globalized world? This course explores the ways in which archaeology and the past reach the general public (e.g., Who is this "general public"? Where do archaeologists encounter the public? How do we communicate, if at all?).

CLARCH 382 / CLCIV 382. Food in the Ancient World: Subsistence and Symbol
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines patterns of food production and consumption in the ancient Mediterranean world in order to observe the organization and symbolic construction of communities through time. Manners of eating and drinking - or starving - in Greek, Hellenistic and Roman society will be focus for attention.

CLARCH 389 / CLCIV 379 / HISTART 389. Pompeii
(3 - 4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course uncovers the urban fabric of Pompeii (Italy) as revealed by more than two centuries of excavation. We look at how it was laid out, at public and private buildings and their decoration, and at its the wider cultural, geographical and historical contexts. Using archaeology and translated texts, we explore aspects of the lives of the inhabitants, including their economy; social interaction; politics; and, choices.

CLARCH 420 / HISTART 430. Greece before History: The Art and Archaeology of Greek Lands ca 3500 to 700 BCE
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the origins, character and collapse of complex societies of the Late Bronze Age in the Aegean. Sources of evidence include architecture, artifacts, mortuary practices and the distribution of sites within the wider landscape. We also explore recent work on documentary sources, including the linear B (Mycenean) tablets.

CLARCH 424 / HISTART 424. Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 425. Hellenistic and Republican Roman Architecture
CLARCH 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course covers the architecture of first millennium BCE Italy. It provides a sense of how later Roman architecture came into being by retracing its origins from the Iron Age to the Etruscan period. Hellenistic Italian architecture is analyzed within its proper Mediterranean context.

CLARCH 426. Roman Imperial Architecture
CLARCH 222/HISTART 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course surveys the architecture of the Roman empire from the reign of Augustus at the turn of the millennium to the reign of Justinian in the mid-sixth century A.D. Special attention is paid to the urban development of Rome as an imperial capital, and to the Romanization of indigenous peoples through Western Europe and the Mediterranean world.

CLARCH 433 / HISTART 433. Greek Sculpture
Upperclass standing, some preparation in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology or History of Art. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

History of Greek sculpture from the 8th century to the 4th century BCE. Treats free-standing statuary and relief and architectural sculpture in stone, bronze, terracotta, and gold and ivory. Examines evolving functions of Greek sculpture, and relationships between stylistic development and social and political change.

CLARCH 435 / HISTART 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 439 / HISTART 439. Greek Vase Painting
Upperclass standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 440 / HISTART 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece
Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

CLARCH 443 / HISTART 443. The Art and Archaeology of Greek Colonization
Upperclass standing and CLARCH/HISTART 221. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The 8th and 7th centuries saw Greeks migrating from their home cities and countrysides to new settlements in many corners of the Mediterranean world. The course explores the art and archaeology of their colonization. They went South to Egypt and Libya, North to unoccupied tracts of Thrace, yet further North to explore the coasts of the Black Sea and its hinterland, and as far West as France and Spain. The most thoroughgoing of these new settlements were perhaps in Sicily and South Italy where new Greek cities came to rival the cities of their motherland in size, power, splendor and wealth.

CLARCH 480. Plants in Archaeology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course provides a background for the analysis and interpretation of archaeobotanical data aimed at preparing students for the critical assessment of published archaeobotanical reports. Different macro and micro remains are introduced, with particular attention to carpological data. The lab portion of the course focuses on the practical hands-on aspects of sorting, identifying, and quantifying archaeobotanical macro-remains, with an emphasis on charred seeds. Identification training will focus primarily on the identification of major Old World crop seeds.

CLARCH 481 / HISTART 481. Art of Ancient Iran
Upperclass standing and HISTART 101 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 482. Ceramic Analysis
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Pottery is one of the most common artifact types found during archaeological fieldwork. This course provides students with an array of practical and theoretical tools for working with ancient pottery, from analyzing fabrics and forming methods, to addressing the scale of production and broad-scale distribution patterns.

CLARCH 495. Senior Honors Research
Consent of instructor required. Upperclass standing. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course is intended for Honors concentrators writing a thesis in Classical Archaeology.

CLARCH 496. Practicum in Museum Studies
Junior or seniors, or permission of instructor. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This practicum, intended primarily but not exclusively for Honors concentrators in Classical Archaeology, will allow students to acquire technical and research skills in the field of museum studies.

CLARCH 497. Practicum in Field Archaeology
Junior or seniors. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This practicum, intended primarily but not exclusively for Honors concentrators in Classical Archaeology, will allow students to acquire technical and research skills in the practice of field archaeology.

CLARCH 499. Supervised Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. F, W, Sp, Su.

CLARCH 534 / HISTART 534. Ancient Painting
Upperclass standing, HISTART 101 and either HISTART/CLARCH 221 or 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

CLARCH 536 / HISTART 536. Hellenistic and Roman Sculpture
HISTART 101; one of CLARCH 221 or 222 or HISTART 221 or 222; and Upperclass standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Classical Civilization (CLCIV)
Classical Civilization is an exploration of the life and culture of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Students examine almost every aspect of ancient life – art, architecture, social/political problems and events, and the literature of these cultures. Knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required for this program, but highly recommended.
CLCIV 101. Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English)
(4). (FYWR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GTBOOKS 191 or 201. F.

An introduction to the civilization of ancient Greece from the beginning through the Hellenistic age. Through the reading of literature that ranges from comedy to philosophy, we confront the contradictions of this complex society. There are approximately 75-100 pages of reading per week, two short projects, a midterm and a final examination. No previous knowledge is required.

CLCIV 102. Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English)
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. W.

An introduction to the civilization of ancient Rome from the beginnings through the beginnings of Christianity. Requires no knowledge of Greek or Latin.

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

This course introduces students in a small group seminar to a variety of topics in Classical Civilizations. Course content will vary each term.

CLCIV 121. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Composition)
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (4). (FYWR). May not be repeated for credit.

CLCIV 125. Mini Course in Classical Civilization
(1). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Special topics in Classical Civilization offered in a mini course format.

CLCIV 126. From Humanitas to Humanities
(1). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

We examine the historical roots of the deceptively familiar word "humanities" by reading Terence's Self-Tormentor, Cicero's speech in defense of the poet Archias, followed by medieval and Renaissance writings that reveal both the shaping of the educational concept behind the Latin word humanitas and the role of the humanities throughout the ages.

CLCIV 157 / PHIL 157. Introduction to Ancient Philosophy
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Many of the central questions in Western philosophy were first formulated by thinkers in ancient Greece and Rome. This course provides an introduction to those questions and a wide range of answers, as well as to the methods ancient philosophers used to address them. We will read key ancient texts, including some by the early Greek thinkers, such as Democritus; several dialogues of Plato; selected passages from Aristotle's ethics, psychology, and natural science; and works by Epicureans and Stoics, whose schools of thought were influential in the Hellenistic and Imperial periods.

CLCIV 215. Ovid
(1). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

We will read and discuss in class Ovid's Metamorphoses and Amores in modern translations, with selections from Ovid's other works. We will also look at Golding's Metamorphoses (the translation Shakespeare used) and Marlowe's Amores, as well as the recent volume of translations and imitations.

CLCIV 217. Minicourse on the Origins of Medical Terminology
(1). May not be repeated for credit.

This minicourse introduces students interested in the health-care professions to the origins of modern medical terminology from ancient Greek and Latin. The minicourse is designed to boost vocabulary acquisition and facilitate student access to current scientific, literary, and cultural discourse on the medical sciences.

CLCIV 223 / CLARCH 223. Greeks and Barbarian
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

In the first millennium BCE, Greek adventurers, traders, colonists, and mercenaries traveled all over the ancient world, from Gibraltar to Afghanistan, from Egypt to the Black Sea. This course offers an archaeological perspective on the interactions between Greeks and non-Greeks and how those experiences helped shape both groups.

CLCIV 253. The Mediterranean: Classical Studies
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This interdisciplinary course studies the Mediterranean Sea as a geographical space and contact zone, and as a field of study, from the late antique to modern period. It incorporates visual and material culture, as well as historical and literary sources from the Mediterranean basin. This course is part of the cross-disciplinary team-taught course "The Mediterranean."

CLCIV 277 / ENVIRON 277 / HISTORY 277. Environmental History of the Ancient Mediterranean
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course concerns the ecology and environmental history of the Mediterranean during the Greek and Roman Periods. Students will be introduced to the discipline of environmental history through case studies drawn from various regions within the broader Mediterranean basin. Attention will also be given to perceptions of the natural world in ancient literature.

CLCIV 302 / HISTORY 302. The Roman Republic
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the political and social history of the Roman Republic from the archaic period to the death of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE.

CLCIV 303 / HISTORY 303 / WOMENSTD 303. Roman Women
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will cover the period roughly 400 BCE-400 CE, a time frame that will include the founding of the Republic, the rise of the Roman Empire, and the growth of Christianity from a fringe religion to the state religion. We will look particularly at women's family roles, legal status, political involvement, and sexuality. Although Roman history had no women's movement in the traditional sense, women's lives changed a great deal during these 800 years. One of the biggest changes was from a society that valued women's fertility and role as mother to one that valued their life-long virginity.

CLCIV 327 / CLARCH 327 / HJCS 326 / NEAREAST 355 / RELIGION 326. Jews in the Roman Mediterranean: Archaeology, Religion, and Culture
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

An introductory survey course on the history of the Jews in the Roman and Byzantine worlds, from the arrival of the Romans in the East in the first century BCE through the Arab conquests in the seventh and eighth centuries CE.

CLCIV 328. Ancient Languages and Scripts
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A general introduction to the study of ancient languages and the origin and development of their scripts and literatures. Topics examined include decipherment, ascertaining ancient pronunciation, linguistic prehistory and change, and the history and study of Greek and Latin.

CLCIV 339 / ASIAN 365 / HISTORY 339. Doctors in the Ancient World: China, Greece, and Rome
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course compares medicine in ancient China (particularly acupuncture) with medicine found in ancient Greece and Rome. We look at physicians in China, such as Chinese Chunyu Yi, and in Greece and Rome, such as Hippocrates and Galen. The course explores the following questions: How was medicine defined in the ancient world? To what extent was its practice similar or different from modern professional forms? Was medicine a craft or a science? Did ancient physicians dissect? What relationship existed between medicine and religion or magic? How do we explain differences between the Western and Chinese medical traditions?

CLCIV 341. Classics and Cinema
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores films as interpretations of the ancient world, how contemporary concerns have influenced the presentation of antiquity in film, and how the movies have influenced our view of antiquity. We examine mythological adventures, the Christian epics of the 1950's, spectacles of Roman history, and adaptations of classical texts.

CLCIV 342. Sexuality and Sexual Stereotype in Greek and Roman Culture
(3 - 4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The main aim of this course will be to consider how sexuality is constructed in the literature of the Greeks and the Romans. Subjects addressed will include sexual stereotype and role-reversal; the power relations of gender; homosexuality and heterosexuality; virginity and prostitution; sexuality and violence.

CLCIV 345. Slavery and Ethnicity in