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Courses in LSA Asian Languages & Cultures
The department offers instruction in the languages, literatures, linguistics, and cultures of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet, South Asia, and Southeast Asia, including courses in traditional and modern Chinese and Japanese literature, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean civilization, Chinese philosophy, courses in the literatures and cultures of South and Southeast Asia, and a sequence of courses on the religions of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet, South and Southeast Asia.

The department’s core courses in the modern languages of East, South and Southeast Asia are designed to develop proficiency in the basic skills of speaking, aural comprehension, reading, and writing. To speed students’ progress toward a working knowledge of language, intensive work in Chinese and Japanese is usually offered during the summer (students must apply for admission to the summer program).

The faculty and staff in the department reserve the right to require students with previous background in an Asian language to take a placement test. Students will be placed in language classes according to the department’s best assessment of the student’s language skill and previous training. The department’s first-year language courses are designed for students with minimal or no previous exposure to the language in question. Students having previous experience with a language may be required to begin study at a higher level of instruction.

Please Note: Undergraduates with native or near native ability in an Asian language taught in the department (e.g., Chinese or Japanese) should not use that language to fulfill the language requirements for their sub-concentration if they decide to concentrate in Asian Studies.

Asian Studies (ASIAN)
ASIAN 200 / HISTORY 203. Introduction to Japanese Civilization
A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

This course is an overall survey of Japan's past and present designed primarily for first and second year students.

ASIAN 204 / HISTORY 204. East Asia: Early Transformations
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

The course introduces the histories, cultures, and societies of East Asia, including China, Japan and Korea from the archaeological phases through early modern times, ca 1700. It emphasizes social transformation that was made possible through international exchanges of knowledge and goods, technological innovations and adaptations, literacy and thoughts.

ASIAN 205 / HISTORY 205. Modern East Asia
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

An interdisciplinary analysis of the impact of the modern world on the traditional cultures of China, Japan, Korea, and related areas, and the subsequent transformation of the societies of these countries, with an examination of the differing responses of China and Japan to the modern challenge.

ASIAN 206 / HISTORY 206. Indian Civilization
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A lecture survey of the civilizations of India from earliest times to the present.

ASIAN 207 / HISTORY 207. Southeast Asian Civilization
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

A lecture survey of the civilization of Southeast Asia -- both the Indo-China peninsula and the islands from Indonesia to the Philippines -- from earliest times to the present.

ASIAN 210 / HISTORY 219. The Philippines: Culture and History
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to the historical formation and cultural complexity of the Philippines. It surveys major periods in Philippine history, paying particular attention to the cultural effects of processes and events such as: religious conversion; revolution and nationalism; U.S. Imperialism; modernity, globalization, and migration.

ASIAN 219. Warrior Saints: Introduction to Sikhism
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers a comprehensive overview of the Sikh tradition which originated in India's Punjab region five centuries ago. The course examines Sikhism in its Indian and global context, focusing on its history, texts, and evolution into a living spiritual tradition that is fully engaged with the political world.

ASIAN 220 / RELIGION 202. Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an introduction to the study of Asian religions. We will consider representative material drawn from some of the major Asian traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, etc.), from ancient times down to the present day.

ASIAN 222. Great Books of Japan
A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. W (in odd years).

An introduction to the great works of literature that have exerted a determining influence on the lives and culture of the Japanese from ancient times to the present.

ASIAN 223 / RELIGION 223. Krishna Speaks: Bhagavad-Gita
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This class introduces Hinduism to students through an intensive study of this single most important scriptural text, the Bhagavad-Gita. We spend half the time going over the text-in-translation, chapter by chapter. The other half of the class time is devoted to critical issues relating to the text, i.e., history of the text, its transmission, its location within the history of Hinduism, its connections with political/cultural history, its ancient and modern interpretations.

ASIAN 225 / RELIGION 225. Introduction to Hinduism: Origins and Development of Classical Hinduism
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Hinduism is a major world religion practiced by over a billion people, primarily in South Asia, but it also was the precursor of Buddhism, and along with Buddhism it had a major impact on the civilizations in East and Southeast Asia. This class will cover its origins and development, its literature, its belief and practices, its unique social structures and doctrines, its interactions with other religions, and finally its confrontation with and accommodation of "modernity."

ASIAN 230 / PHIL 230 / RELIGION 230. Introduction to Buddhism
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in Philosophy.

ASIAN 231 / RELIGION 231. Introduction to Tibetan Buddhism
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the development of Buddhism in Tibet. It begins with an introduction to those doctrines and practices of Indian Buddhism that would come to hold an important place in the Tibetan tradition and goes on to examine the process of transmission of Buddhism from India to Tibet.

ASIAN 234 / RELIGION 234. Buddhism and Death
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course investigates a wide range of Buddhist doctrines and practices centered on dying, death, and the afterlife. These topics are explored to gain a more nuanced understanding of traditional and modern religious phenomenon as expressed in distinctly Buddhist contexts.

ASIAN 241 / HISTORY 251. The Chinese Renaissance: Cultural Transformations in Eleventh-Century China
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the profound economic, political, social, philosophical, religious, artistic, and technological developments in the Song Empire (960-1279). Readings in scholarly articles and translated primary documents reveal a flourishing culture of subtle perception and startling achievement that resembles the European Renaissance both in many of its particulars and in its general significance for human civilization.

ASIAN 243 / HISTART 243. Introduction to South Asian Art
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course surveys the arts of South Asia, from the earliest remains of Indus Valley civilization through the contemporary period.

ASIAN 248 / HISTORY 248 / RELIGION 248. Jesus Comes to Asia: Conversion and its Consequences in Asia
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides a broad introduction to the study of Christian conversion and its legacy in the regions now known as South, East, and Southeast Asia.

ASIAN 251. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture
No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

ASIAN 252. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

ASIAN 255. Undergraduate Seminar in Asian Studies
(3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This undergraduate seminar offers lower division LSA students a small group learning experience. Students will explore a subject of particular interest in collaboration with a faculty member in the area of Asian studies.

ASIAN 256 / GTBOOKS 256. Great Books of Asia
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces undergraduates to the major works of literature, philosophy, and religion from East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

ASIAN 257. Great Cities in Asia
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course serves as an introduction to four great cities in Asia: Tokyo, Seoul, Shanghai, and Mumbai. It focuses on a number of key issues that are critical to making sense of these cities.

ASIAN 258. Food and Drink of Asia
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course uses food and drink as a window into the culture and history of East Asia, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.

ASIAN 259 / HISTORY 255. The History of Modern South Asia
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This is an introductory level course on the history of India as it relates to the life and times of Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869-1948), one of the great political philosophers of the 20th century. The course will focus on British colonial rule, India's independence, and Gandhi's legacy in postcolonial India.

ASIAN 260 / HISTORY 252. Introduction to Chinese Civilization
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

This course introduces students to major problems and controversies in pre-modern Chinese cultural studies. It covers the political, cultural, social, and material history from the Neolithic period to the Mongol conquest in the 13th century.

ASIAN 261. Introduction to Modern Chinese Culture
No knowledge of Chinese required. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

By following modern Chinese cultural history from the late 19th century to the 21st century, we study how various cultural forms (such as literature, visuals arts, and cinema) rose in response to historical exigencies and at the same time had significant impact on the course of history. Our goal is to gain a deeper understanding of the complex experience of modernity in China.

ASIAN 264. Looking at Traditional China Through its Most Famous Novel, The Story of the Stone
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The Story of the Stone (Honglou meng) is arguably the most influential work of traditional Chinese literature. It charts the difficult growth into adulthood of a number of adolescent cousins fortunate enough to be living together. This course allows students to explore the many different facets of this complex novel.

ASIAN 270 / HISTORY 253. Introduction to Korean Civilization: Premodern Period
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit will be given to students who are enrolled in or have completed ASIAN 249/HISTORY 249.

This course serves as a general introduction to Korean history and culture from earliest times to the nineteenth century. The goal is to see how time, space, gender, class, history, language, body, self, and salvation were defined and used in premodern Korea.

ASIAN 271 / HISTORY 254. Introduction to Korean Civilization: Modern Period
ASIAN 270. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of modern Korean history, culture, and society from the end of the dynastic period to the present. Explores transformations of Korea through colonialism, civil war, authoritarianism, rapid industrialization, and democratization.

ASIAN 272 / RELIGION 272. Introduction to the Study of Korean Religions
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course serves as a broad survey of the major themes and developments in the history of religion in Korea. It begins with traces of religious life from the Neolithic period and ends with the rise of new religious movements in contemporary Korea.

ASIAN 273. North Korea: Real and Imagined
(4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course acts as an introduction to North Korea, examining this controversial state from the perspective of history, international relations, and contemporary society.

ASIAN 275 / HISTORY 288. India Calling: Culture and Society in Contemporary India
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course proposes to examine modern Indian culture and society. It will focus on three interrelated themes of Indian culture, tracing their transformations from the pre-modern to the modern: religion, gender, and caste. It will pay particular attention to the manner in which various components of Indian culture were constituted in the colonial and postcolonial periods.

ASIAN 276 / AMCULT 276. India as Imaginary Homeland: an Introduction to Cultural Constructions of National Identity
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

What is India? This course surveys novels, short stories, essays and films that ask what South Asian identity is in colonial and postcolonial India, including in diaspora. There is a midterm and final open-book examination, four short reaction papers, as well as reading note cards due every class. This course assumes no prior knowledge of South Asia.

ASIAN 280. Topics in Asian Studies
(3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Provides an opportunity for non-specialists to explore a particular area of Asian culture. It aims to give beginning students a background for the study of Asian topics, as well as special insights into the (literary) traditions, philosophies, and beliefs of different peoples within Asia.

ASIAN 282 / RCHUMS 283 / SAC 282. Asia Goes Viral: Asian Pop Culture in the Age of Social Media
(4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the popular culture of Asia. Topics will include film, television, anime, music, and social media.

ASIAN 292 / HISTART 292. Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HISTART 495.

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the history of Japanese visual culture, introducing the art of the archipelago from ancient times through the present day. Although primarily a chronological examination of key artistic monuments, it also discusses thematic issues in Japanese art history, such as nature, gender, and modernity.

ASIAN 296. Study Abroad in Asia
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is required for any student participating in a study abroad program associated with a Department of Asian Languages and Cultures course. Students will attend meetings with the instructor leading the trip to discuss travel requirements, safety, cultural norms, and some basic language instruction when necessary. It is the goal of this course to prepare students for travel abroad and to increase their understanding of Asian cultures through experiential learning.

ASIAN 300. Love and Death in Japanese Culture
A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A critical study of major works of Japanese literature from the eighth through the nineteenth century, with a view to illuminating cultural attitudes towards love and death within the sociopolitical, religious and philosophical contexts.

ASIAN 301 / WOMENSTD 301. Writing Japanese Women
Knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

A critical study of Japanese women's writing in the classical and modern periods, aimed at comparing their self-representations with the portrayal of them in the general male dominated culture of writing and the visual arts.

ASIAN 302. Rewriting Identities in Modern Japan
Knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Readings in modern Japanese fiction aiming to examine the shifts in the concept of self and identity under the impact of modernization and Western influence, and in tension with traditional Japanese philosophy.

ASIAN 304 / HISTART 304. The Art of Yoga
(4). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

As yoga becomes increasingly popular it is important to query its early development, transformation over the centuries, and the possibilities and perils that it holds forth to its practitioners. Graphing milestones in the history of yoga, this course is also an introduction to South Asian visual, literary, and religious culture.

ASIAN 305 / RELIGION 305. Religion and Violence in the Secular World
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

How do we think about religion and violence in a secular world? Through a series of case studies focusing on the world's major religious traditions including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Judaism, Sikhism and Buddhism, this course reflects on a variety of contemporary themes including the War on Terror, religious pluralism, the fate of liberal democracy etc.

ASIAN 306 / RELIGION 306. What is Religion?
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines: 1) the genesis and evolution of the modern concept of religion through the writings of key thinkers; and 2) its relevance to themes as diverse as politics, belief, love, capitalism, imperialism, mysticism and spirituality, secularization, and pluralism.

ASIAN 307 / HISTORY 308 / RELIGION 307. Eat, Pray, Love: Devotional Traditions in South Asia
ASIAN 220 or 225. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the meaning and location of devotion within Indian religions. Over the semester, the course grapples with the centrality of practice, beyond the world of scripture and sacred texts, in understanding Religion. Focusing primarily on Hindu, Sikh, and Islamic devotional traditions, this course guides students to a deeper and nuanced understanding of the practice of popular religion in the Indian subcontinent today, as well as in the past.

ASIAN 308 / RCHUMS 308. Arts and Ideas of Modern South and Southeast Asia
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

How have the countries of South and Southeast Asia re-conceptualized their cultures, accommodating to or rejecting Western views in the 20th century? Focusing primarily on India, Thailand and Indonesia, this course examines the aesthetic responses of twentieth century writers, musicians, and dancers as they come into contact with Western ideas.

ASIAN 313. Modernism and Modernity in East Asian Fiction
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Comparative analysis of modern fiction from China, Korea and Japan with an emphasis on thinking about both the specificities of literature of the region as well as shared and interconnected experiences of modernity which broadly connect the cultures of the region during the twentieth century.

ASIAN 314. Photography in Japan
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

How have photographers shaped understandings of Japan and contributed to visual culture? To answer these question, this course examines select photographic works and their writing. Students acquire the tools to interpret photographic images and learn about images that affected modern Japanese history.

ASIAN 324 / AAPTIS 325 / HISTORY 325 / RELIGION 325. The History of Islam in South Asia
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the history of Muslim communities and institutions in South Asia. It will consider Muslim political expansion and sovereignty, conversion, the interaction between religious communities, Islamic aesthetics, the impact of colonial rule, India?s partition and the creation of Pakistan, and the contemporary concerns of South Asia?s Muslims.

ASIAN 325 / RELIGION 323. Zen: History, Culture, and Critique
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism.

ASIAN 326. Introduction to Japanese Buddhism
ASIAN 230. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This survey introduces key texts, figures, and practices from over one thousand years of Japanese Buddhism. Students encounter both the history and the continuing relevance of the tradition in areas including ritual life, "popular" and "high" culture, tourism, and ethnonational self-understanding.

ASIAN 329. Violence and Nonviolence in the Buddhist Traditions of Asia
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

In the West, Buddhism enjoys a reputation for nonviolence. However, Buddhism in its Asian homelands also includes a complicated, hidden history of violent thought and deed. This course uncovers those complications in Buddhist philosophy, historical records, biographies, and objects, emphasizing the recent histories of Buddhist Asia.

ASIAN 330. Divided Loyalties, Divided Laughter: Understanding South Asia through Literary Humor
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides a survey of fictional works from South Asia that offer social critiques as trenchant as they are playful. Historical background is given in class, with discussion focused on reading and complexities of these issues through humor. All material is taught in English.

ASIAN 331 / PHIL 331 / RELIGION 331. Introduction to Indian Philosophy
One introductory course on Hinduism or Buddhism. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will cover major transitions in philosophical thinking in ancient and classical India. It will cover the traditions represented by the Upanishads, Jainism and Buddhism, the Bhagavad-Gita, and the various schools of classical Hindu Darshanas.

ASIAN 333. Sacred Collectives: Nation and Religion in South Asia
ASIAN 206/HISTORY 206 or ASIAN 259/HISTORY 259. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will inquire into the intersections between religion and nation in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine the following: the rise of anti-colonial nationalism in the late 19th century, the idea of "Mother India", the formation of Pakistan, and the rise of religious and ethnic nationalism in South Asia.

ASIAN 336. Controversies in Contemporary India
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will examine five contemporary and burning issues in Indian society today and use these to delve into larger issues and challenges that face India as a nation and a culture as it finds itself in the twenty-first century.

ASIAN 340 / AAPTIS 340 / HISTORY 340 / MENAS 340 / REEES 340. From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
(4; 3 - 4 in the half-term). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides an overview of modern Central Asian history. It focuses on the empires of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang).

ASIAN 354 / HISTORY 354. War, Rebellion and Revolution in China Through Two Centuries
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores rebellions and revolutions in China, from the White Lotus rebellion in the late 18th century through social protests during the last decades of the 20th century. Although the social matter is arranged chronologically, different time periods are used to highlight different themes in the Chinese "revolutionary tradition".

ASIAN 359. Crime and Detection in Chinese Literature
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This class focuses on the development and place of genres focusing on crime and detection in traditional China and the fate of these genres in Modern China. We investigate the legal system and how it is represented in the stories. The various Chinese genres and subgenres are compared with similar and related genres in the West.

ASIAN 362. The Travels of the Monkey King in China and Abroad
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The Monkey King is well known in China and abroad, especially among children. He is the star of the famous 16th century novel, The Journey to the West, and countless adaptations since. This class looks at the deeper meanings of his story and the reasons for his wide popularity.

ASIAN 363. Chinese Drama and Theater
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Prior to the introduction of modern electronic media, theater served as the mass media of China. It is important enough in the 20th century to be the main medium for political campaigns. This course explores the development of Chinese theater from its prehistory to the present, both in performance and as reading material.

ASIAN 364. The Development of Chinese Fiction
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Chinese fiction developed from parables and historical narratives into a mature form almost entirely independent of the west until the end of the 19th century. This course charts the evolution of the major Chinese fictional genres, introducing numerous famous works and their vision of traditional Chinese society.

ASIAN 365 / CLCIV 339 / HISTORY 339. Doctors in the Ancient World: China, Greece, and Rome
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course compares medicine in ancient China (particularly acupuncture) with medicine found in ancient Greece and Rome. We look at physicians in China, such as Chinese Chunyu Yi, and in Greece and Rome, such as Hippocrates and Galen. The course explores the following questions: How was medicine defined in the ancient world? To what extent was its practice similar or different from modern professional forms? Was medicine a craft or a science? Did ancient physicians dissect? What relationship existed between medicine and religion or magic? How do we explain differences between the Western and Chinese medical traditions?

ASIAN 366. Controversies in Contemporary China
ASIAN 260 or ASIAN 261. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores four contemporary controversies in the People's Republic of China. It incorporates a wide range of source material, including primary sources in translation and documentaries. Students acquire the skills to deliver nuanced examinations of issues affected by state censorship, media, and Cold War politics.

ASIAN 367 / LING 367. Languages of Asia
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course provides students with an exploration of the history of language and Asian regions, including China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Indonesia, Vietnam, India, and Pakistan. It offers a broad perspective on the history and culture of the region, as well as a general introduction to linguistic analysis and methodology.

ASIAN 368 / LING 368. How Different is Chinese?
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course investigates and critically analyzes Western writings about the Chinese language from the 16th century to the present.

ASIAN 369. Chinese Film
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an overview of Chinese cinema from throughout "Greater China," i.e., mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, from the 1940s to the present. Apart from examining the representation of national identity and modern history in Chinese film, we also discuss its increasingly transnational development.

ASIAN 370. Acupuncture: Historical and Contemporary Transformations
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will survey the modern history and contemporary practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine. In particular, critical attention will be given to current scientific debates about the safety and efficacy of the tradition.

ASIAN 371. Natural Disasters in East Asia
(3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines natural disasters in East Asia from a sociopolitical, historical, and comparative perspective. Students are asked to consider the influence of class, ethnicity, education, and power on the making and outcome of such natural disasters.

ASIAN 373 / RCHUMS 373. The Performing Arts in South and Southeast Asia
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores how artists put together performances in South and Southeast Asia, through focusing on the ancient Indian epic, The Ramayana. We examine ways that identities are performed locally, nationally and internationally and also ways that performers and analysts from that part of the world approach and discuss the phenomenon of performance.

ASIAN 374. Korean War in Fiction and Film
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An examination of the Korean War and its enduring impact through literary and cinematic representations. Literary texts include fiction and memoirs by Asian and Asian American writers. Special attention is paid to the cultural politics of the Cold War and ideologies of race.

ASIAN 375. Modern Korean Literature
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An overview of major works of modern Korean fiction in English translation. Explores the relationship between literature and politics within historical contexts of colonialism, civil war, authoritarianism, rapid industrialization, and demonstration.

ASIAN 376. Controversies in Contemporary Korea
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines four contemporary controversies in Korea (South and North) in order to provide a broad understanding of the very recent history of the birthplace of the "Korean Wave" and the "Miracle of the Han River": (1) comfort women, Japanese history textbook controversy, and Dokdo; (2) globalization, economic growth, and the Korean Wave (Hallyu); (3) North Korea and the Axis of Evil; (4) education fever in South Korea.

ASIAN 377. K-Pop and Beyond: Popular Culture and Korean Society
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The course examines popular culture as South Korea's newest and fastest-growing global export. We will approach popular culture as a prism through which to understand the historical forces and politico-economic structures that have shaped contemporary Korea, and as the site of active negotiation in translation and transnationalization of social experience.

ASIAN 380. Topics in Asian Studies
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

ASIAN 381. Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
At least one course in Asian Studies (ASIAN) with a minimum grade of C-. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Asian Studies majors with junior or senior standing. (3). May not be repeated for credit. W.

Readings, discussion, analysis, and short papers on major themes in the field, and the writing of short critical essays. Emphasis on the pre-modern period.

ASIAN 382. Approaches to Asian Studies
A minimum of two Asian studies courses. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the methodology and theory of Asian Studies. In particular, psychoanalytic and post-colonial approaches are emphasized.

ASIAN 395. Honors Thesis
Consent of instructor required. Honors candidate in Asian Studies. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

This is a thesis-writing course for Honors concentrators in Asian Studies.

ASIAN 396. Asian Studies Internship Reflection Seminar
(1). May be elected twice for credit.

An independent study for students to analyze their experiences in an Asian Studies internship, completed the previous term. Special focus is given to how the experiences of such internships can be used to deepen students' understanding of Asian cultures and societies.

ASIAN 415 / HISTORY 415. Law and Society in Late Imperial and Modern China
Junior or senior standing. No prior knowledge of China or Chinese required. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

The Chinese legal order is one of the great legal traditions that has not only exercised a tremendous influence on other legal systems in East Asia for centuries, but still exerts a considerable influence in China today. In recent years, new research methods and improved access to archival materials have shed new light on many aspects of Chinese legal history. This course explores major topics in Chinese legal history through selected readings of secondary and primary sources, as well as through audiovisual materials and fiction.

ASIAN 423 / HISTORY 423. Topics in Premodern South Asian History
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This topics course explores themes in premodern South Asian history, allowing a deeper engagement at a thematic level rather than chronological. Students are asked to examine premodern South Asian history through an analysis of both primary and secondary sources.

ASIAN 424 / HISTORY 424. Topics in Modern South Asian History
(3 - 4; 3 in the half-term). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This topics course explores themes in modern South Asian history, allowing for a deeper engagement at a thematic level rather than chronological. Students are asked to examine modern South Asian history through an analysis of both primary and secondary sources.

ASIAN 428 / POLSCI 339. China's Evolution Under Communism
Upperclass standing. (4; 3 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an analysis of developments since 1949 with particular emphasis on the evolution of political control, economic development, and social change and their relationship to ideology.

ASIAN 430. Philosophy of the Sikh Gurus
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores key philosophical concepts in the teachings and practice of the Sikh Gurus and how they apply to the contemporary world. Concepts include personal and impersonal notions of God, reality and nihilism, mystical experience, language and self, time and history, love and eroticism, and life and death.

ASIAN 435. Truth Claims in Indian Literature: Nonfiction Accounts of Gendered Discrimination
At least one 300-level Asian Studies course or an equivalent literature/culture studies course in another department. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course focuses on examples of translated Indian literary nonfiction that protest against a range of systemic violence, especially based on gender, caste and nationality. These literary texts combined with broader, theoretical readings help students explore questions about how English translations of world literature in various categories help us understand global issues of injustice.

ASIAN 439. Himalayas: An Aesthetic Exploration
Undergraduate and graduate students seeking to enroll for this course should have completed at least one course on the arts/languages/religions of South/Central/East Asia. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Studying Himalayan art and architecture offers an opportunity to embark on expeditions to distant frontiers, acquire critical appreciation of the impact of geography on cultural production and gain deeper understanding of historical process that have transpired in this region and continue to exert an influence in our own times.

ASIAN 450 / HISTORY 450. Japan to 1700: Origin Myth to Shogun Dynasty
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course discusses the history of Japan from prehistoric times to the final, unified Samurai polity. Topics include the rise of the imperial family, changing gender relations, multi-belief system, economic developments, samurai's legal culture and violence.

ASIAN 451 / HISTORY 451. Japan's Modern Transformations
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of the transformation of Japan from a semi-feudal state to a world economic power, with emphasis on the diversity and conflict that has shaped Japan's modern history.

ASIAN 458 / SAC 458. Film Culture in Korea
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will explore the history of Korean cinema through the framework of national/transnational cinema discourse, auteur/genre theory, globalization, the division system, and the problem of nation/state which evokes the question of identity. Students will learn Korean cinema through key films, directors, and dominant genres.

ASIAN 464 / RELIGION 464. From Mystic Saints to Holy Warriors: Islam in Southeast Asia
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Islam has taken many forms in Southeast Asia: from the sometimes otherworldly mysticism of Sufi saints to the hard-liner Islamist agendas of some contemporary jihadists. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of these various forms of Islamic expression, viewing them through the lenses of history, culture, politics, and film.

ASIAN 467. Lu Xun and Modern China
ASIAN 261. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Lu Xun was arguably the most important writer in 20th-century China. We read all of his fictional writings and examine how they articulate issues and anxieties central to the Chinese experience of modernity. We also study Lu Xun's biography and select interpretations of his stories as secondary materials.

ASIAN 469 / HISTART 469. Modern Chinese Visual Culture
ASIAN 261. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the changing visual experiences and expressions in China from the early twentieth century to the present. A range of visual materials will be studied. We will also consider studies of and theories about visual culture from other contexts and why visual culture is fundamental to Chinese modernity.

ASIAN 480. Topics in Asian Studies
(3). May be elected four times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Covers issues of relevance to Asia as a whole or to more than one of the geographical areas covered in the department.

ASIAN 484. Buddhist Tantra
ASIAN 230. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Upperlevel topics course on Buddhist Tantra.

ASIAN 490 / PUBPOL 428 / SOC 428. Contemporary China
One introductory course in sociology. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a general but systematic introduction to contemporary China. It covers its history, cultural practices, government, economy, and family structure. Special attention is given to the various domains of daily life, including education, work, income, health, leisure, marriage, housing, and psychological wellbeing.

ASIAN 494 / HISTART 495. Ocean of Stories: Telling Tales in the Indian Subcontinent
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This course investigates painters' engagements with India's literatures. Beginning with storytelling in contemporary artworks, this course proceeds to examine the emergence, refinement, and dispersion of literary and pictorial conventions in cosmopolitan early India and their transformations in later periods when book arts interacted with vernacularization, performative traditions, and eventually print culture.

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. F, W, Sp/Su, Sp, Su.

Asian Languages (ASIANLAN)
ASIANLAN 101. First Year Chinese I
(5). May not be repeated for credit. Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 101 is an introductory course in speaking, understanding, reading and writing Chinese. Students are expected to achieve control of the sound system, basic sentence patters, aural comprehension, daily conversations and writing characters.

ASIANLAN 102. First Year Chinese II
ASIANLAN 101 with a minimum grade of C- or by Assignment of ASIANLAN 102 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 102 is a continuation of the First Year Chinese course. In this course, the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are emphasized. Toward the end of the term each student and his/her conversation partner will prepare a 6-minute conversation that will be videotaped and evaluated by the instructors.

ASIANLAN 103. Intensive First Year Chinese
Consent of instructor required. (10). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 101 and 102, or 104.

ASIANLAN 103 is equivalent to the regular two-semester sequence ASIANLAN 101-102. The student is expected to achieve control of the sound system, to gain the ability to communicate in the Chinese language for daily activities and also to be able to read and write Chinese characters.

ASIANLAN 104. First Year Chinese for Mandarin Speakers
Consent of instructor required. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 101, 102, 103.

This course is designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. ASIANLAN 104 focuses on reading and writing Chinese and cover the regular 101-102 reading and writing materials.

ASIANLAN 111. First Year Filipino I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Tagalog/Filipino is the national language of the Philippines. The oral approach is greatly emphasized in the classroom, using questions and answers and short dialogues to develop active use of the language in the most natural way possible. This is complemented by the use of taped lessons.

ASIANLAN 112. First Year Filipino II
ASIANLAN 111 or by assignment of ASIANLAN 112 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. Filipino will serve as medium of instruction.

Tagalog/Filipino is the national language of the Philippines. The oral approach is greatly emphasized in the classroom, using questions and answers and short dialogues to develop active use of the language in the most natural way possible. This is complemented by the use of taped lessons.

ASIANLAN 115. First Year Hindi I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 117. Students with prior knowledge of Hindi are encouraged to take ASIANLAN 118.

Hindi is the national language of India. The course meets four hours per week in four sessions. The Devanagari writing system is introduced. The course concentrates on developing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension.

ASIANLAN 116. First Year Hindi II
ASIANLAN 115 or by assignment of ASIANLAN 116 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 117.

Hindi is the national language of India. The course meets four hours per week in four sessions. The Devanagari writing system is introduced. The course concentrates on developing skills in reading, writing, speaking, and aural comprehension.

ASIANLAN 119 / AAPTIS 119. Introductory Central Asian Language I
(4 - 5). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 519. May not repeat the same language at the same level.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read, and write at a basic level in the Central Asian language of their choice. Repeatable for different languages.

ASIANLAN 120 / AAPTIS 120. Introductory Central Asian Language II
AAPTIS 119 or ASIANLAN 119 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4 - 5). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 520 or ASIANLAN 520. May not repeat the same language at the same level. May not repeat the same language at the same level. Undergraduate students elect AAPTIS 120 or ASIANLAN 120; graduate students elect AAPTIS 520 or ASIANLAN 520.

This course develops students' ability to speak, listen, read, and write at a basic level in the Central Asian language of their choice.

ASIANLAN 121. First Year Indonesian I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Indonesian is the sixth most prevalently spoken of the world languages. The elementary course comprises a two-term sequence designed to provide the students with a basic working knowledge of the Indonesian language. The course aims at the acquisition of the four basic language skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing--in modern Indonesian. The class emphasizes aural-oral exercises and practice and the learning of culture throughout the course.

ASIANLAN 122. First Year Indonesian II
ASIANLAN 121 or by assignment of ASIANLAN 122 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

Indonesian is the sixth most prevalently spoken of the world languages. The elementary course comprises a two-term sequence designed to provide the students with a basic working knowledge of the Indonesian language. The course aims at the acquisition of the four basic language skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing--in modern Indonesian. The class emphasizes aural-oral exercises and practice and the learning of culture throughout the course.

ASIANLAN 124. Accelerated Elementary Japanese
By Assignment of ASIANLAN 124 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed for students with some Japanese background who want to continue their study. The learning speed is faster than in ASIANLAN 125 and students are able to review what they learned before entering UM. In addition, students are introduced to new grammatical patterns and expressions.

ASIANLAN 125. First Year Japanese I
(5). May not be repeated for credit. Native or near-native speakers of Japanese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 124, 127, 129 or RCLANG 196.

The goal of the course is the simultaneous progress of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as becoming familiar with aspects of Japanese culture which are necessary for language competency. Recitation session are conducted in Japanese emphasizing speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speeds. Analyses, explanation, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist.

ASIANLAN 126. First Year Japanese II
(ASIANLAN 124 or 125) or by Assignment of ASIANLAN 126 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 127 or 129 or RCLANG 196.

The goal of the course is the simultaneous progress of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as becoming familiar with aspects of Japanese culture which are necessary for language competency. Recitation session are conducted in Japanese emphasizing speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speeds. Analyses, explanation, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist.

ASIANLAN 127. Intensive First Year Japanese
Permission of instructor. (10). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have competed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 124, 125, 126, or 129 or RCLANG 196.

The goal of the course is the simultaneous progress of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as becoming familiar with aspects of Japanese culture which are necessary for language competency. Recitation session are conducted in Japanese emphasizing speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speeds. Analyses, explanation, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist.

ASIANLAN 128. Mastering the Basics of Kanji: Learning Strategies and Orthography
ASIANLAN 126, 127, or 129/RCLANG 196 with a minimum grade of C-. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (1). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is designed for students who want to learn more about kanji (Chinese characters). It offers two main methods: kanji learning strategies and Japanese calligraphy. Together they facilitate the acquisition of kanji and thus supplement kanji learning in regular Japanese courses.

ASIANLAN 129. Intensive Japanese I
Consent of instructor required. (10). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted for students who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 125, 126 or 127.

A thorough grounding is given in all the language skills (speaking, reading, writing, and listening) in this course. The oral component aims to provide students with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in practical situations. In the reading/writing component, Hiragana, Katakana, and 145 Kanji are introduced.

ASIANLAN 135. First Year Korean I
(5). May not be repeated for credit. Native or near-native speakers of Korean are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 137.

This first-year course is for those who have no or minimal proficiency in Korean. This course will introduce the basic structure of Korean while focusing on the development of reading, writing and speaking skills.

ASIANLAN 136. First Year Korean II
ASIANLAN 135 or by assignment of ASIANLAN 136 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 137.

This First-Year course is for those who have no or minimal proficiency in Korean. This course will introduce the basic structure of Korean while focusing on the development of reading, writing and speaking skills.

ASIANLAN 138. Reading and Writing Korean I
Consent of instructor required. (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 135, 136, or 137.

This course is designed for students with prior experience in the language, namely the listening and speaking abilities of daily Korean, but who know little of how to read and write in Korean.

ASIANLAN 145. First Year Punjabi I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an introduction to spoken and written Punjabi, a major language of northern India and of Pakistan, with some 80 million speakers. It will begin with a concentration on the spoken language, emphasizing oral-aural skills, and introducing the Gurmukhi script.

ASIANLAN 146. First Year Punjabi II
ASIANLAN 145 or by assignment of ASIANLAN 146 by Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an introduction to spoken and written Punjabi, a major language of northern India and of Pakistan, with some 80 million speakers. It will begin with a concentration on the spoken language, emphasizing oral-aural skills, and introducing the Gurmukhi script.

ASIANLAN 151. First Year Sanskrit I
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will work toward developing a proficiency with the basic tools necessary to read and write Sanskrit, the classical language of India. Les