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Courses in LSA Germanic Languages & Literatures
Dutch and Flemish Studies (DUTCH)
DUTCH 111. First Special Speaking and Reading Course
(4). May not be repeated for credit. Graduate students should elect DUTCH 511. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in DUTCH 100. F.

DUTCH 112. Second Special Speaking and Reading Course
DUTCH 111. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Graduate students should elect DUTCH 512. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in DUTCH 100. W.

DUTCH 160. First Year Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. F.

The course aims to introduce first-year students to the Humanities aspect of Dutch studies: Dutch Culture, Literature, Cinema, and the Arts. The course is taught in English.

DUTCH 231. Second-Year Dutch
DUTCH 112 or 100. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Graduate students should elect DUTCH 531. F.

DUTCH 232. Second-Year Dutch
DUTCH 231. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. Graduate students should elect DUTCH 532. W.

DUTCH 339. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. (2 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp.

Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degree and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

DUTCH 340. Amsterdam: Negotiating Tolerance
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course tells the story of the Dutch capital through its history, religion, culture, politics, economics, and urban landscape. With a special focus on the city's (perceived) culture of tolerance, the class will discuss issues of diversity in modern-day Amsterdam through careful examination of its historically based values of collaboration and negotiation. You will analyze texts and visual materials, and develop your daily discussion writing into three papers and a classroom presentation.

DUTCH 351 / JUDAIC 351. Anne Frank in Context
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the Holocaust in The Netherlands and beyond through the analysis of the Diary of Anne Frank, its film, stage and television adaptations, and related materials. It aims to increase your understanding of anti-Semitism and other forms of hatred and discrimination. Topics include Jewish immigration, Jewish Amsterdam, bystanders, resistance movement, and controversial issues like the fictionalization of Anne Frank and alleged Holocaust exploitation. Taught in English

DUTCH 491. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature
Senior standing or permission of instructor. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in English.

DUTCH 492. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in English. W.

German (GERMAN)
GERMAN 100. Intensive Elementary Course
(8). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 101, 102 103 or RCLANG 191.

The completion of the content of GERMAN 101 and GERMAN 102 in one semester.

GERMAN 101. Elementary Course
All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 103, or RCLANG 191. F, W, Su.

GERMAN 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Learning a new language for the first time is exciting and fun, and the course curriculum and materials focus on engaging students' interest, creativity, and sense of humor. The course focuses systematically on the concurrent development of students' ability to understand spoken and written German and to speak and write German themselves, and on exposing students to a broad range of aspects of German culture. While children may be good at picking up a second language when living in the culture, adults are much better at learning languages in the classroom. This course aims to take advantage of this by helping students to develop effective language learning strategies and by providing students with a wide range of tools and resources to help them to learn the language. By the end of the term students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

GERMAN 102. Elementary Course
GERMAN 101. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 103, or RCLANG 191. F, W, Sp.

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101. By the end of the academic term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a basic foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

GERMAN 103. Review of Elementary German
Assignment by placement test or permission of department. (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, 102, or RCLANG 191.

This course provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. It focuses systematically on the concurrent development of students' ability to understand spoken and written German, speak and write German themselves, and exposure to a broad range of aspects of German culture.

GERMAN 111. First Special Reading Course
Permission of the department. (4). May not be repeated for credit. The course does not satisfy the LSA foreign language requirement. Taught in English.

GERMAN 112. Second Special Reading Course
GERMAN 111 or placement test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. This course does not satisfy the LSA foreign language requirement. W, Su.

GERMAN 171 / HISTORY 171. Coming to Terms with Germany
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

GERMAN 180. First Year Seminar
No knowledge of German is required. Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

GERMAN 221. Accelerated Third Semester German
GERMAN 102 and assignment by placement test. (5). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed GERMAN 230 or 231. Four credits granted to those who have completed GERMAN 102 or 103.

Intensive review of basic grammar and more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Substantial emphasis on providing a firm grammatical base, and on reading, discussing, and writing about authentic German texts from natural and social science to history, literature and the arts.

GERMAN 230. Intensive Second-Year Course
GERMAN 102 or 103 or equivalent and assignment by placement test, or permission of instructor. (8). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, 232, or RCLANG 291.

Intensive German II covers all of second-year German in one academic term. The goals of the course are to expand vocabulary, improve communication skills, and master grammatical structures and syntax to a level of competency that meets advanced intermediate standards for proficiency. One hour of class develops essay writing and oral communication skills, focusing on autobiographical and literary texts about the major events in 20th- and 21st-Century German cultural history. The second hour is devoted to in-depth study and practice of grammar aimed at developing students' ability to apply correct forms and syntax and be aware of stylistic nuances even when using the language spontaneously. Through engagement with course materials including films and other visual and performance texts, and through interaction with teachers and classmates both in formal and informal contexts, students develop speaking, aural comprehension, and writing skills. By the end of the term, students are able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature and of general interest, and to communicate with some ease with a native speaker in spoken and written language. Though training for study abroad or work abroad are not course objectives, per se, students are often well qualified to do either after completion of this course.

GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course
GERMAN 102 or 103 and assignment by placement test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230, 221, or RCLANG 291.

Students will review and extend their grammatical knowledge by means of an online grammar consisting of summaries, explanations, lots of examples, practice exercises and "diagnostic exercises"; designed to make learning grammar fun and interesting. The feature films, DVD and video clips, readings and other course materials will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, and literature. By the end of the course, students should be able to survive without using English in a German-speaking country, have enough conversational skills to meet people and enjoy themselves, be comfortable surfing the web in German, be able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, and be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar in order to pursue their own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond.

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course
GERMAN 221 or 231 and assignment by placement test. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or RCLANG 291. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. F, W, Sp, Su.

In this course, students complete the four-term introductory language sequence by selecting one of several "special topics" courses intended as an introduction to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Politics and Society, Film, or Science, taught in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in German throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course. Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study. More generally, students should be ready by the end of the course to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany.

GERMAN 243. Faust
(3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course will cover the four great literary versions of the Faust legend: Marlowe's, Goethe's, Thomas Mann's, and Bulgakov's (The Master and Margarita), and will include brief background lectures on a wide variety of related topics.

GERMAN 300. German Grammar and Composition
GERMAN 230, 232, or RCLANG 291. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. Its content is focused on everyday situations and current events.

GERMAN 302. Topics in German Politics and Society
Consent of department required. (3). (SS). May be elected three times for credit.

The course introduces students to the Social Sciences aspects of the interdisciplinary field of German Studies: German Politics and Society, German Economy and Business, Sociology, Sociolinguistics. The course is taught in English.

GERMAN 303. Topics in German Culture and the Arts
Consent of department required. (3). (HU). May be elected three times for credit.

This course introduces students to the Humanities aspects of the interdisciplinary field of German Studies: German Culture, Literature, Cinema, and the Arts. The course is taught in English.

GERMAN 304. Studies in German Culture
(1 in the half-term). (HU). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

German Minicourses are intended to introduce a specific German topic to general student audiences. Basic concepts and analytical techniques are introduced, and the students gain significant knowledge of a clearly-defined topic.

GERMAN 306. Conversation Practice
GERMAN 230, 231, or 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. (1). May be elected three times for credit. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not receive credit for GERMAN 306. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

The goal of this course is to increase students' confidence in speaking on any topic. It will focus on a variety of topics ranging from practical language situations to current cultural events to areas of students' academic interests.

GERMAN 310. Studies in German Culture
Residence in Max Kade German House; others by permission of instructor. (1). May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

Each week, students will learn about a major figure or movement in German cultural history. Topics will vary each time the course is offered in order to take advantage of relevant performances, exhibitions, and lecturers, and in order to make it possible for students to retake the class. Some portion of the course will be conducted in German.

GERMAN 312. Study Tour Abroad
Consent of department required. Max Kade Resident or GERMAN 221/231 or 310. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit.

Residents in the Max Kade Program meet regularly during the Winter Semester in preparation for a study tour organized by the Department to a major city in a German-speaking country over spring break. Upon return students complete a reflection paper based on their observations.

GERMAN 322 / HISTORY 322. The Origins of Nazism
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in German in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule of why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take multi-layered approach to this question, examining the relationships among the between political, cultural, and social, and economic change. First exploring the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic in which the Nazis rose to power, we will then analyze the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will also examine the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims of the regime. Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only historical texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

GERMAN 325. Intermediate German
GERMAN 230, 232, RCLANG 291 or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Taught in German.

This course is designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German by way of introduction to various topics in German Studies. Topics to be offered include: German Politics, Film and Literature, Berlin, The German Language Past and Present, German Expressionism, and German Youth Culture.

GERMAN 326. Intermediate German
GERMAN 230, 232, or RCLANG 291 or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor. (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. W. Taught in German.

This course is designed to improve proficiency in written and spoken German by way of introduction to various topics in German Studies. Topics to be offered include: German Politics, Film and Literature, Berlin, The German Language Past and Present, German Expressionism, and German Youth Culture.

GERMAN 329. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. PER. CHRM. (1 - 4; 1 - 2 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. F, W, Sp, Su.

GERMAN 330 / SAC 332. German Cinema
(3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

An introduction to German cinema and its cultural background from the beginning to the present, with emphasis on the classical period (ca. 1918 to 1938) and the modern (post-1965) resurgence.

GERMAN 332. Kino: German Film
GERMAN 230, 232, or RCLANG 291 or by placement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

This course offers an introduction to salient issues in German cinema, from its beginnings through the most recent productions. Emphasis is on formal developments and historical contexts. Students will learn how to identify and discuss important cinematic techniques and their meanings.

GERMAN 333 / SAC 333. Fascist Cinemas
SAC 236. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This interdisciplinary course explores the fascist-era cinemas of Germany, Spain, Italy, and Japan. It focuses on a set of common themes to identify both commonalities and specificities of a given context or historical moment.

GERMAN 336. German in Song
GERMAN 230 or 232 or RCLANG 291 or the equivalent as per placement test results. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

The objectives of this course include improving confidence in speaking and enunciating German through singing and creative vocalization, while exploring topics relevant to Germany society. The class will form an a cappella choir and part of class time will be spent on oral performance. You do not have to be a good singer or musician to participate - there will be a role for everyone. The culmination of our work will be a concert performance at the end of the semester.

GERMAN 350. Business German
GERMAN 230 or 232 or RCLANG 291, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as: the geography of business in German; the European Union and Germany's roll therein; trade; traffic and transportation; marketing; industry; money and banking; and ecology. In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. The language of instruction is German.

GERMAN 351. Practice in Business German
Internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Students will write three lengthy reports, in German, on their internship experience; provide copies of follow-up correspondence with the employer and host family; and make an oral presentation on the experience in an upper-level Business German course.

GERMAN 357. Tutoring High-School and K-8 German
Sophomore standing and above. Completion of one graded German course beyond GERMAN 300. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Undergraduates tutor students who are learning German in local public high schools or assist in offering German to elementary schools and middle schools. The goals are to strengthen ties between local schools and the university, to introduce teaching as a potential career path to undergraduates, to heighten awareness of foreign languages, and to promote the study of German.

GERMAN 358. German Teaching Assistance for Children at the Deutsche Schule Ann Arbor (DSAA)
Sophomore standing or beyond. Completion of two of the following courses: GERMAN 300, 325, 326, 332, 336, 350, 351, 357, 380, 385, 425, 426, 430, 431, 454, 457, 464, or 499. (1). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Students assist a kindergarten or preschool teacher at the Deutsche Schule Ann Arbor (DSAA), a learning community that teaches German to Ann-Arbor-area children. Students provide roughly 2.5 hours of teaching assistance approximately every other Saturday. Students also submit short reports in German describing their progress and meet with UM-instructor.

GERMAN 375 / MEMS 375 / SCAND 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on mythology of these cycles.

GERMAN 378. History of German Science
(3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

This course deals with important scientific discoveries and debates in eighteenth to early twentieth-century German science. It follows a hands-on approach with students reenacting scientific demonstrations and testing theories through experiment. The course promotes a better understanding of both the history behind the science and the science behind the history. All materials are in English, but may also be read in the original German.

GERMAN 379 / POLSCI 386 / SOC 379. Sports, Politics, and Society
One introductory course in sociology or political science. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for those who have completed SOC 212/GERMAN 212.

This course embraces broadly-based theories of society and politics to comparatively examine sports in the U.S. and Europe. Sports are closely tied to societal values on both sides of the Atlantic and furnish an excellent example for the study of popular attitudes and behavior.

GERMAN 380. Introduction to German Literature
GERMAN 232. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to German history and culture through a survey of German literature, ranging from Baroque to post-unification literature. While organized chronologically, the course also discusses core themes (such as war and literature). Finally, the course explores questions of literary genre and literature's relation to other artistic media.

GERMAN 385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present
GERMAN 230, 232, or RCLANG 291, or the equivalent (placement test) or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

In this course we will read a variety of German-language short-fiction texts from the Austro-German literary tradition. The texts stem from the late nineteenth century to the present day. We have four major goals. The first includes learning about German literary and aesthetic movements from the end of the 19th century to the present. Secondly, we will discuss literary genre, which in our case means most prominently a discussion of the short story and the novella as literary forms in comparison to such forms as the novel. A third goal is to execute careful "close readings" of our texts. Here the point is not to merely "catch the drift" of the plotline, but to make a diligent effort to tease out important, often gratifying, details of the text that can assist us in deepening our understanding of it. Finally, on the level of language pedagogy, this course - taught entirely in German - will seek to improve the reading, writing, speaking, and listening-comprehension skills of students at the 300-level.

GERMAN 386. Fairy Tales
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course is an introduction to the German folk tales collected by the Brothers Grimm, their modern adaptations (both literary and visual), and the most important scholarship devoted to them. Assignments include readings in the tales themselves, film adaptations, theoretical engagements, and a number of interpretative and creative writing assignments. Taught in English.

GERMAN 401 / HISTORY 416. Nineteenth-Century German and European Intellectual History
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Between the upheavals of the French Revolution and the First World War, the European nations witnessed an utter transformation of their world. The relations of person to the nation, to the state, to history, and the physical world were rethought from top to bottom. Our exploration of modern ideas will take us from rationalism to racism, and from utopian ideologies to the birth of psychoanalysis.

GERMAN 402 / HISTORY 417. Twentieth-Century German and European Thought
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course will present a survey of the principal European intellectual movements of the twentieth century. We shall examine the interplay of political and cultural movements, and pay consistent attention to the difficulty of self-definition of the intellectual within rapidly changing social and cultural contexts. Socialism, Liberalism, Fascism, Surrealism, Existentialism, Cultural Marxism, Structuralism, Feminism, and Post-structuralism.

GERMAN 425. Advanced German
GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Various approaches will be utilized to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to a tape or watch a videocassette concerning the history or culture of the German-speaking countries.

GERMAN 426. Advanced German
GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. W. Taught in German. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Various approaches will be utilized to improve the students' proficiency. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages. Occasionally students are required to listen to tape or watch a videocassette concerning the history or culture of the German-speaking countries.

GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German
GERMAN 350 or one 300-level course beyond GERMAN 232, and permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. W. Taught in German.

This course introduces students to the language of German business and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as: the geography of business and industry in German; the European Union and Germany's role therein; traffic, transportation and trade; social structure; economic structure; ecology. In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics.

GERMAN 431. Business German: Management and Marketing
GERMAN 350 or 430. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

This course offers authentic terminology and information as they apply to professional practices in the fields of management, marketing, and company forms in the German-speaking world. Language of instruction is German.

GERMAN 449. Special Topics in English Translation
(3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Taught in English. Rackham credit requires additional work.

GERMAN 454. German Romanticism
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be elected twice for credit. Taught in German. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Study of German prose literature (Novelle and novel) of the 20th Century.

GERMAN 460. Europe's Islam: From Dante to Rushdie
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

As the second largest religion in Europe, Islam continues to influence the concept of European culture and determine the boundaries of Europe. At a time when Islam and the West are constructed as mutually exclusive, it is important that students investigate the history of Islam in Europe to gain a balanced understanding of its place in contemporary European culture.

GERMAN 464. Postwar German Ethnicities in Literature and Culture
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in German.

This seminar pursues questions concerning the nexus between nation, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and religion in postwar Germany. Based on a survey over the cultural history of specific ethnic groups, students discuss cultural representations that challenge conventional notions of "Germanness." We evaluate various approaches to cultural productions by ethnic communities in Germany and their implications for the concept of German culture.

GERMAN 470. Workshop in Translation
Two of the following courses: GERMAN 300, 325, 326, 332, 336, 350, 351, 357, 380, 385, 425, 426, 430, 431, 454, 457, 464, or 499. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course introduces advanced German students to translation practices and theories, as well as to the business and advanced study of translation. We focus upon producing translations from German to English. We will orient ourselves around the professional standards and guidelines of the American Translators Association (ATA), so that students will receive direct experience with approaches to translation in a "real world" environment.

GERMAN 490. Topics in German Culture
Junior or senior standing. (1). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

This course features rotating topics in German culture. Topics may range from the middle ages to the present, and from literature to film, music, and the arts. Taught in English.

GERMAN 491. German Honors Proseminar
Senior Honors standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of GERMAN 492, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. F.

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar
Senior Honors standing. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. W.

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies
One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3; 2 in the half-term). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Taught in German.

GERMAN 517 / ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics
Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

GERMAN 531 / EDCURINS 431. Teaching Methods
Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (3). May not be repeated for credit. F.

GERMAN 540. Introduction to German Studies
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Scandinavian Studies (SCAND)
SCAND 103. Elementary Swedish
(4). May not be repeated for credit.

Essentials of grammar, written exercises, pronunciation, vocabulary building, and study of idioms. An introduction to literary texts.

SCAND 104. Elementary Swedish
SCAND 103. (4). May not be repeated for credit. Students needing SCAND 103 or the equivalent for entry into SCAND 104 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination by the instructor.

Essentials of grammar, written exercises, pronunciation, vocabulary building, and study of idioms. An introduction to literary texts.

SCAND 233. Second-Year Swedish
SCAND 104 or 100. (4). May not be repeated for credit.

SCAND 234. Second-Year Swedish
SCAND 233. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. Students needing SCAND 233 or the equivalent for entry into SCAND 234 can meet this prerequisite by passing an examination given by the instructor.

SCAND 325. Third Year Swedish
SCAND 234. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May be elected twice for credit.

This course builds on the knowledge of Sweden and the Swedish language acquired during the first and second year courses. Students expand their knowledge about Sweden by reading and discussing fictional and non-fictional texts as well as watching movies. They write weekly response papers and one essay-length paper which is also presented in class.

SCAND 331. Introduction to Scandinavian Civilization
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A survey of artistic, intellectual, political, social, and literary traditions of Scandinavia from the Viking Age to the present.

SCAND 349. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. F, W, Sp.

This course serves the needs of students who wish to develop special topics not offered in the Scandinavian Studies curriculum. It may be a program of directed readings with reports, or it may be a research project and long paper. Either must be supervised by a faculty member, and the student must have the faculty member's agreement before electing the course. This course is also used by concentrators for developing preliminary research and a prospectus for the senior thesis.

SCAND 351. Practice in Business Swedish
SCAND 234, plus internship in a Scandinavian country. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers students an opportunity to receive credit for an eight-week summer internship in a Scandinavian country. During the following semester, the student will complete and turn in a report written in Swedish. The students will also give a presentation in the second-year language classes.

SCAND 375 / GERMAN 375 / MEMS 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. F.

A study of the Celtic and Nordic cycles of myths and sagas, including the Nibelungenlied, Tristan and Isolde cycles, the Irish Tain, the Welsh Mabinogi, the Scandinavian Edda and some of the literature based on mythology of these cycles.

SCAND 442. The Icelandic Saga (in English Translation)
Upperclass standing or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Yiddish (YIDDISH)
YIDDISH 101 / JUDAIC 101. Elementary Yiddish I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 431 or YIDDISH 431. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 431 or YIDDISH 431. F.

This is the first of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish. Active class participation is required as are periodic quizzes, exams, a midterm, and a final.

YIDDISH 102 / JUDAIC 102. Elementary Yiddish II
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 101. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 432 or YIDDISH 432. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 432 or YIDDISH 432. W.

This is the second of a two-term sequence designed to develop basic skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing Yiddish. Active class participation is required as are periodic quizzes, exams, a midterm and final.

YIDDISH 201 / JUDAIC 201. Intermediate Yiddish I
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 102. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 531 or YIDDISH 531. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 531 or YIDDISH 531. F.

This is the third term of a language sequence in Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed. Special emphasis will be devoted to reading material.

YIDDISH 202 / JUDAIC 202. Intermediate Yiddish II
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 201. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 532 or YIDDISH 532. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 532 or YIDDISH 532. W.

This is the fourth term of a language sequence in Yiddish. The course is designed to develop fluency in oral and written comprehension, and to offer a further understanding of the culture within which Yiddish has developed. Special emphasis will be devoted to reading material.

YIDDISH 301 / JUDAIC 301. Advanced Yiddish I
JUDAIC 102 or YIDDISH 202. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 631 or YIDDISH 631. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 631 or YIDDISH 631. F.

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music. Students will also learn how to approach handwritten documents.

YIDDISH 302 / JUDAIC 302. Advanced Yiddish II
JUDAIC/YIDDISH 301. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in JUDAIC 632 or YIDDISH 632. Graduate students elect JUDAIC 632 or YIDDISH 632. W.

This is the third year of the language sequence, focusing on reading and speaking Yiddish. Literary, historical and other texts will be considered, along with film, folklore, and music. Students will also learn how to approach handwritten documents.

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