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Courses in LSA Romance Languages & Literatures

The department offers courses in French, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, Romance linguistics, and Romance languages and cultures.

The Language Requirement for the A.B. or B.S. Degree

The study of a second language expands the outlook and interests of the educated citizen. By providing insight into the social and intellectual life of other peoples, language study fosters humanistic attitudes and cultivates a spirit of tolerance and understanding.

Students who have previous training or experience in a particular language are required to take a placement test before electing a course in that language. Please note that students may not take the placement test in a particular language more than one time. Placement test information, including testing dates, are available on the department website at: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll.

Students who demonstrate a fourth-term proficiency are certified to have fulfilled the LSA language requirement. Other students are placed in courses according to their demonstrated degree of competence and satisfy the LSA language requirement by successful completion of FRENCH 232, ITALIAN 232, PORTUG 232, SPANISH 232, or the equivalent. Students with previous background in or exposure to a Romance language are encouraged to continue study of that language through the freshman and sophomore years. The language requirement cannot be satisfied by out-of-residence credit which is elected after the student has begun degree enrollment in LSA.

French (FRENCH)
FRENCH 100. Intensive Elementary French
No prior instruction in French OR placement of FRENCH 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. (8 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed FRENCH 101, 102, 103, 113 or RCLANG 190.

This course introduces students to French language and culture with an emphasis on communication. The content-based approach integrates grammar with functional use.

FRENCH 101. Elementary French
No prior instruction in French OR placement of FRENCH 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed FRENCH 100, 113, or RCLANG 190.

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essentials of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture needed to communicate in French at a moderate speed. Vocabulary and structures are practiced through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills. Cultural awareness and listening skills are also developed through listening and video materials.

FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued
FRENCH 101 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 103, 111 or 112, or RCLANG 190.

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essentials of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture needed to communicate in French at a moderate speed. Vocabulary/structures are practiced through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills. Cultural awareness/listening skills are also developed through listening/video materials.

FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French
Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement; RCLANG 150. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed FRENCH 100, 102, 113, or RCLANG 190.

A refresher course for students with previous training in French, but not ready for a second-year course.

FRENCH 113. Accelerated Reading in French
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 100, 101, 102, 103, 111, 112, or RCLANG 190. Completion of FRENCH 113 does not satisfy, even partially, the LSA language requirement.

Accelerated course designed to develop reading and translation competence in French.

FRENCH 230. Intensive Second-Year French
One of FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); OR assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8 in the half-term). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 231 or 232 or RCLANG 290 or 310.

FRENCH 231. Second-Year French
One of FRENCH 100, 102, or 103 or RCLANG 190, (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); OR assignment of FRENCH 231 on Placement test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310.

FRENCH 231 develops and refines listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills; provides strategies for effective communication and reading; reviews and adds to previously learned grammatical structures and uses; develops an awareness of French-speaking cultures; utilizes technology to help with the study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued
FRENCH 231 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); OR RCLANG 250; OR assignment by placement test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed FRENCH 112 or 230 or RCLANG 290 or 310.

FRENCH 232 uses literature, magazine articles, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several Francophone countries. Students are expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, it focuses on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing sophisticated sentences.

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French
FRENCH 230 or 232 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 290 or 310, or assignment by placement test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students who receive transfer credit from for FRENCH 232 and wish to continue with their language study are strongly encouraged to take the placement exam to be certain that they are prepared for FRENCH 235. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 240. French and Francophone Topics in Translation
A knowledge of French is not required. Enrollment restricted to first- and second-year students. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Intensive study of a selected topic in the cultures and societies of French-speaking peoples, taught in English using translated materials.

FRENCH 241 / HISTART 271. Origins of Modernism: Art and Culture in Nineteenth Century France
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, state-sponsored form of Classicism to the succession of movements that emerged in opposition to official art. The course is also designed to encourage close readings of images within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debates.

FRENCH 244. Issues in Race and Cultural Diversity in the Francophone World
Enrollment restricted to first- and second-year students. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Intensive study of cultural productions and social issues in French-speaking societies related to issues of race or ethnicity, taught in English using translated materials.

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture
FRENCH 235 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Intensive study of a topic, theme, or genre in the literatures and other cultural productions of French-speaking peoples, providing an introduction to the methods and practice of literary and cultural study in the French language and opportunities for development of linguistic proficiency beyond the 4th semester level.

FRENCH 272. French and Francophone Film, Media, and Culture
FRENCH 235 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Intensive study of a topic in the culture of French-speaking peoples with emphasis on film, television, and other modern media, providing an introduction to the methods and practice of film and media study in the French language and opportunities for development of linguistic proficiency beyond the fourth-semester level.

FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture
FRENCH 235 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Intensive study of a topic in the culture, politics, and structures of French-speaking societies providing an introduction to the methods and practice of cultural and social study in the French language and opportunities for development of linguistic proficiency beyond the 4th semester level.

FRENCH 276. Spoken and Written Performance in French
FRENCH 235 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Intensive practice in the creation, production and performance of culture through the French language providing opportunities for development of linguistic proficiency beyond the 4th semester level.

FRENCH 333. French Phonetics
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320); or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 335. Composition and Stylistics
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 337. Seminar in Translation
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250 and above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 340. French Literature in Translation
A knowledge of French is not required. (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

FRENCH 343 / HISTORY 323. French Enlightenment
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Through primary source readings, discussions, and lectures, students gain an understanding of the French Enlightenment as a part of the critical response to French society, politics, and culture before the French Revolution. Through readings in secondary sources students are introduced to current debates about the Enlightenment. All Readings are in English translation.

FRENCH 344 / HISTORY 313. The Revolutionary Century: France, 1789-1900
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

The French revolution of 1789 announced the beginning of a new age in which established social and political traditions were to be swept away before the bracing winds of cultural novelty and political experimentation. Using a variety of sources--biography, historical documents, novels, and recent studies--this class explores the social and political history of France's revolutionary century, paying special attention to its resonance beyond its borders.

FRENCH 345 / HISTORY 314. Empire, War, and Modernity: France and the World in the 20th Century
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

In the fall of 2005, people all over the world were shocked to see images broadcast on television of young men in France burning cars and schools in their own neighborhoods and battling with heavily armored police on the outskirts of many French cities. With the help of autobiographies, novels, and works of history written by French people who lived in metropolitan France, as well as Senegal, Algeria, and Martinique, we examine the painful trajectory of French history across this period.

FRENCH 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320); or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Readings and topical studies relating to French speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

FRENCH 361. French American Studies
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320); or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320 (RCCORE 320). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Taught in French.

Pan-American or regionally focused studies of the French Americas. Taught in French.

FRENCH 362. Quebec and French Canadian Studies
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 363. Caribbean Studies
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 365. African Studies (Sub-Saharan)
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 366 / MEMS 386. Medieval Literature, History, and Culture
Two courses in FRENCH numbered FRENCH 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered FRENCH 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Readings and topics studies relating to the literatures and cultures of langue d'oil and langue d'oc in the Middle Ages.

FRENCH 367 / MEMS 377. Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France
Two courses in FRENCH numbered FRENCH 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered FRENCH 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Readings and topical studies relating to French culture under the ancient regime (Renaissance through French Revolution).

FRENCH 368. Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 369. Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 372. Film and Cinema Studies
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 374. Problems in Society and Social Theory
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 375. Cinema and Society in the Francophone World
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 378. Studies in Genre
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

FRENCH 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

FRENCH 380. Intermediate Business French
One course in French numbered FRENCH 250 through 299; or FRENCH 235 and RCLANG 320; or study abroad equivalent. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 414. A maximum of nine credits from FRENCH 380, 381, and 414 as well as any of their equivalents accepted as transfer and/or study abroad credit can count toward the concentration or academic minor.

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the language of business transactions in France. It deals with both written and spoken commercial French. It is partly built around a fictitious company whose activities are divided into themes dealing with various aspects of the business world.

FRENCH 381. Internship in France or Other Francophone Countries
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) FRENCH 380. (3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. A maximum of nine credits from FRENCH 380, 381, and 414 as well as any of their equivalents accepted as transfer and/or study abroad credit can count toward the concentration or academic minor. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Preparation for internship experience; completion of internship in a Francophone country; follow-up class upon return.

FRENCH 399. Independent Study
Two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course in FRENCH numbered 250-299, and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French
FRENCH 380; or two courses in FRENCH numbered 250-299; or FRENCH 235 and two RCLANG 320; or FRENCH 235, one course numbered FRENCH 250-299 and one RCLANG 320. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BA 415. A maximum of nine credits from FRENCH 380, 381, and 414 as well as any of their equivalents accepted as transfer and/or study abroad credit can count toward the concentration or academic minor.

The emphasis is on: 1) a general view of economic development in contemporary France; 2) a detailed analysis of the functioning of economic and commercial practices; 3) the study of communication within the business community. Case history method.

FRENCH 444. Readings in French and Francophone Studies (in English Translation)
One course in FRENCH numbered 240 or above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

FRENCH 450. Special Studies
Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 465. Literature of the Nineteenth Century
Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 466. Literature of the Twentieth Century
Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

FRENCH 469. African and Caribbean Literature
Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be elected twice for credit.

FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course
Seniors only. (3; 2 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of FRENCH 492, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course
Senior standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) FRENCH 491 or ROMLANG 498. (3; 2 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Supervised independent study leading to the following: completion of an honors thesis; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Italian (ITALIAN)
Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school or another college or university must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. Please note that students may not take the Italian placement test more than one time. Beginners desiring to acquire proficiency at a faster pace are encouraged to enroll in ITALIAN 103, followed by ITALIAN 233. Students who choose this option can satisfy the language requirement only if they then receive credit for a more advanced course taught in Italian (ITALIAN 235 or higher). Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level. For more information, visit the department website: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll.
ITALIAN 100. Intensive Elementary Italian
No prior instruction in Italian language OR placement of ITALIAN 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students with any prior study of Italian must take the Placement Test. (8). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for students who are enrolled in or have completed ITALIAN 100 and 101, 102, 103, or 113.

This course is designed to cover the material normally covered in the ITALIAN 101-102 sequence, with the same emphasis on speaking skills, oral comprehension and mastery of basic grammar.

ITALIAN 101. Elementary Italian
No prior instruction in Italian language OR placement of ITALIAN 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students with any prior study of Italian must take the Placement Test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in have completed or are enrolled in ITALIAN 100, 103, or 113.

This course is an introductory-level course designed to provide students with a basis to communicate effectively in Italian in everyday, realistic situations while practicing reading and writing skills.

ITALIAN 102. Elementary Italian
ITALIAN 101 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better). College or university transfer students with any prior study of Italian must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) ITALIAN 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term must take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ITALIAN 100 or 103.

Introductory course presenting basic constructions and vocabulary. Oral drill and practice. Reading material based on contemporary Italian culture. Regular use of Language Laboratory

ITALIAN 103. Accelerated Italian
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ITALIAN 100, 101, or 102.

ITALIAN 103 is particularly appropriate for students who have experience with a Romance language. Students will develop their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills at a rapid pace, while being introduced to Italian culture. ITALIAN 103, 233 and one more course taught in Italian will satisfy the LSA language requirement.

ITALIAN 113. Accelerated Reading in Italian
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed ITALIAN 100, 101, 102, or 103. Completion of ITALIAN 113 does not satisfy, even partially, the LSA language requirement.

Accelerated course designed to develop reading and translation competence in Italian.

ITALIAN 205. Italian Conversation for Non-concentrators
ITALIAN 100 or 102 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment by placement test of ITALIAN 231 or higher. (1). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ITALIAN 206. Conversation for Non-concentrators
ITALIAN 100 or 102 with a grade of C- or higher; or assignment by placement test of ITALIAN 231 or higher; ITALIAN 206 may be elected prior to ITALIAN 205. (1). May not be repeated for credit. ITALIAN 206 may be elected prior to ITALIAN 205. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

ITALIAN 230. Second-Year Italian
ITALIAN 100 or 102 or 103 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); or assignment of ITALIAN 231 on placement test. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Italian must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed ITALIAN 113, 231, 232 or 233.

The course is designed to provide insight into the culture of Italian-speaking peoples. Content-based themes develop cultural awareness and encourage students to formulate opinions on a variety of contemporary issues through reading, video, discussion, and writing.

ITALIAN 231. Second-Year Italian
ITALIAN 100 or 102 or 103, (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); or assignment by placement test. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Italian must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled or have completed ITALIAN 113, 230 or 233.

This course is designed to further improve students' speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. It also provides insight into Italian literature and culture through the reading of literary and journalistic prose.

ITALIAN 232. Second-Year Italian, Continued
ITALIAN 231 (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); or assignment by placement test. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Italian must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed ITALIAN 113, 230 or 233.

This course aims at further development of each student's speaking, reading, and writing knowledge of Italian, including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension.

ITALIAN 233. Accelerated Second Year Italian
ITALIAN 100, 102, or 103, (completed with a minimum grade of C- or better); or assignment of ITALIAN 231 on placement test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled or have completed ITALIAN 113, 230 or 232. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Second-year Italian taught at an accelerated pace, Review of essential principles of grammar and advanced training in idiomatic usage by means of oral and written expression.

ITALIAN 240. Italian Mafia
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course, taught wholly in English, incorporates historical, cinematic, and literary representations in its analysis of a "typically Italian" social phenomenon, the mafia. It traces the historical development of the mafia in Sicily in modern times and investigates the cultural repercussions that the mafia's success created in film and literature.

ITALIAN 270. Italian Literature and Culture
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). (HU). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

A bridge course involving review and practice of the four language skills employed in the study of a topic in Italian literature and culture.

ITALIAN 271. Language in Action
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Intermediate bridge course emphasizing consolidation of language skills focused on a variety of topics using a variety of media in the Italian language.

ITALIAN 275. Multimedia Language and Culture I
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in Italian.

ITALIAN 275 is a content-based course with the goal of deepening students' understanding and knowledge of Italian language and culture through readings, discussion, independent research and writing.

ITALIAN 276. Multimedia Language and Culture, II
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in Italian.

ITALIAN 276 is a content-based course that uses culture as a stimulant for oral and written communication.

ITALIAN 305. Introduction to the Study of Literature in Italian
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course moves beyond grammar practice and review to the more complex challenges of reading and analyzing literature. Students will be introduced to various metric, rhetorical and narrative forms and will learn to navigate poetic syntax and sophisticated prose, passing on to strategies of analysis and interpretation.

ITALIAN 310. Italian Cities
A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

This course, taught in English, will concentrate on the history, literature, and culture of a chosen Italian city as well as the life of that city in the European imagination over time, as reflected in fiction, travel literature, and art.

ITALIAN 314 / HISTORY 326. Modern Italy: 1815 to Present
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the history of Italy from 1815 to the present. Modern Italy has been a laboratory for the social and political change of western Europe. Nationalism, fascism, and social democracy have found Italy an ideal terrain for their conceptual and historical development. We will focus on national unification post-unification strategies and contradictory nature of Italian democracy in post W.W.II decades.

ITALIAN 315. Italian Cinema and Society Since 1945
A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

The course, taught in English, traces the historical development of Italian cinema from the postwar advent of neorealism to the present. In its political, economic, and cultural contexts .

ITALIAN 316 / SAC 316. Screening Italian-Americans
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the history of Italian Americans' representation from gangster films to The Jersey Shore. It also explores how the American film and television industries have historically translated stereotypes about Italians' national, racial, and ethnic difference into a wide range of appealing representations to achieve popular and political consensus.

ITALIAN 317. The Renaissance
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

An overview of the history and culture of the Italian Renaissance (ca. 1300-1600). Taught in English.

ITALIAN 320. Modern Italian Literature
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be elected twice for credit.

Students read and discuss the works of various Italian novelists representing different aspects of the major trends in Italian fiction since WW II, such as neo-realism, experimentalism, and sociopolitical allegory, each of which has played a considerable role in recent Italian culture.

ITALIAN 325. Italian Novels and Films
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Taught in Italian.

This course uses Italian literary texts and films to address issues of nationalism, politics, and culture in Italy from the Unification of the country to the present. It is taught in Italian.

ITALIAN 333 / MEMS 333. Dante's Divine Comedy
A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

Study of Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso in context of medieval culture and history, with focus on the encounter between Dante and the classical past as a model for a present-day encounter with the Middle Ages. The course is taught in English, but uses bi-lingual editions of the text for readers with some knowledge of Italian.

ITALIAN 340. Contemporary Italian Culture
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Readings, screenings, and topical studies relating to contemporary Italian culture in a wide variety of contexts. Possible themes include political life in Italy after electoral reform, the role of mass media in Italian society, and the changing role of women.

ITALIAN 358 / SAC 358. Italian Cinema
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Focusing on the post-WWII period, this course looks at Italian cinema from a number of perspectives: political, commercial, social, and aesthetic.

ITALIAN 359. Italian Culture and History
A knowledge of Italian is not required. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Taught in English.

Topical studies, themes, and problems in Italian literature and culture. The course is conducted in English.

ITALIAN 387. Italian Renaissance Literature
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3; 2 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

ITALIAN 410. Italian for Spanish Speakers
SPANISH 275 and 276; or SPANISH 277. (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted for students who have completed ITALIAN 100, 101, 102, 103, 113, 230, 231, 232, or 233. Conducted in Italian. Students who have completed or are enrolled in a second-year Italian course (ITALIAN 231, 232 or 233) should not take this course, because it is not an appropriate match to the skills they have already mastered. ITALIAN 410 does not count toward the Italian concentration or academic minor requirements. Students may count only one of ITALIAN 410 or PORT 415 toward the Spanish major or minor.

Designed for students with competency in Spanish who wish to learn the essential elements of the Italian grammar at an accelerated pace, as well as acquire listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Due to the linguistic similarities between Spanish and Italian, students will quickly master the four skills, and at the same time get acquainted with the selected topics from the Italian culture.

ITALIAN 422. Politics and Literature
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course explores the relation between politics and literature in the history of Italian culture. Italian intellectuals and writers have been involved in political thought and action since Dante. Machiavelli, who was also a poet and playwright, is synonymous with the birth of political science. Twentieth-century writers, such as Pavese, provide others models for the role of the intellectual in society. The chronological focus of the course may vary year to year.

ITALIAN 430. Twentieth Century Italy through its Literature
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be elected twice for credit. Students may not repeat ITALIAN 430 with the same topic ID for credit.

Narrative fiction of the 10th century to 1980, reflecting cultural change, social realities. Major writers representing different styles and subject matter are covered. All work done in Italian.

ITALIAN 450. Special Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Italian Literature
Consent of department required. ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be elected three times for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Concentrated study of authors, genres, and literary phenomena in Italy between the 13th and 16th centuries. Topics vary year to year. Taught in Italian.

ITALIAN 461. Italian Through Opera
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Students study and internalize the libretto of an opera written in the Italian language for increased oral skills, literary comprehension, and cultural literacy. No special singing skills required. Operas chosen vary year to year. Class includes a trip to the opera.

ITALIAN 464. Modern Italian Poetry
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ITALIAN 467. Screening Italian Fascism
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

This seminar considers two facets of media productions under Fascism. First it examines the film production during Fascism and thus the regime's domestic politics of information, recreation, and consensus; secondly it looks at how international media, particularly in the U.S., enabled and re-broadcast the regime's and Mussolini's popularity.

ITALIAN 468. New Italian Media
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in Italian. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Seminar in topical studies, themes and/or problems in Italian New Media.

ITALIAN 483. Ariosto and Tasso
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

The principal goal of the course will be a familiarization with two monuments of Italian Renaissance literature: Ariosto's Orlando furioso and Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata. Attention will be paid to the immediate social context of these works, as well as their impact on art and literature.

ITALIAN 486. Petrarch's Canzoniere
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (3; 2 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit.

ITALIAN 499. Advanced Independent Study
ITALIAN 230, 232, or 233. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Open only exceptionally to concentrators and graduate students whose program requires training in areas not covered in regular departmental offerings.

Portuguese (PORTUG)

With over 250 million speakers, Portuguese is the seventh most widely spoken language in the world. It’s also one of the half dozen most understood languages on Earth. It is the language of Brazil and Portugal, as well as the official language of Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Macao, São Tomé and Príncipe, and East Timor.

Placement Test. Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school or another college or university must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. Please note that students may not take the Portuguese placement test more than one time. To schedule a Portuguese placement test with the instructor, please contact the RLL main office at (734) 764-5344 for more information.

PORTUG 101. Elementary Portuguese
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PORTUG 100 or 415. F.

PORTUG 102. Elementary Portuguese
PORTUG 101 completed with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students who have not taken PORTUG 101 at UM must schedule a placement exam with the instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PORTUG 100 or 415.

Oral practice, grammar, and reading.

PORTUG 231. Second-Year Portuguese
PORTUG 102 (C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students who have not taken PORTUG 102 at UM must schedule a placement exam with the instructor. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PORTUG 230. F.

PORTUG 232. Second-Year Portuguese
PORTUG 231 (C- or better) or PORTUG 415 (C- or better). (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students who have not taken PORTUG 231 at UM must schedule a placement exam with the instructor. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PORTUG 230.

This theme course reviews specific topics and focuses on cultural awareness. Students practice and improve reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency. Students also discuss issues of relevance to the Brazilian society, while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes of contemporary issues. Grammar and vocabulary are integrated into the content. Materials include newspaper and magazine articles, cronicas, cultural readings, videos, films, songs, Internet explorations, and computer resources.

PORTUG 280. Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages
One of: SPANISH 277, SPANISH 278 or RCLANG 324; or FRENCH 235; or ITAL 230, 232, or 233. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PORTUG 100, 101, or 102. Does not count toward the Spanish major or minor.

Accelerated Portuguese course providing knowledge of grammatical structure, speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

PORTUG 287. Advanced Portuguese Conversation and Composition
PORTUG 232 or 280 or 415. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An intensive advanced review of the Portuguese language in all skills (speaking, writing, reading, and comprehension).

PORTUG 350. Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. PORTUG 232. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Independent study in Portuguese language (advanced), or introductory level literature of civilization. Projects may seek to combine language instruction with an initiation to research in civilization or literature. Intended primarily to those students to whom no regular classroom instruction is available.

PORTUG 460. Portuguese Culture
PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Advanced introduction to Portuguese culture. Through an interdisciplinary focus including lectures and discussions based on history, politics, literature, film, and popular music, students are introduced to contemporary Portuguese society, as well as its trajectory as a nation since the fifteenth century.

PORTUG 461. Brazilian Culture
PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course will offer an introduction to Brazilian culture, history, and politics, as seen primarily through key literary and filmic texts. Our focus will be primarily on the time period immediately following the arrival of the Portuguese royal family to Brazil in 1808 until today, at a time when Brazil is emerging as a major global economic and geopolitical power. In spite of this evolving reality, Brazil continues to be a country with significant socio-economic disparities that are in part the legacy of colonialism. Through short stories, poetry, feature films, and documentaries we will explore the main themes, namely: national identity, authoritarianism, the role of women, social exclusion, dictatorship, and modernization.

PORTUG 462. Lusophone African Cultures
PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

An advanced introduction to the cultures and literature's of Portuguese-speaking Africa, namely: Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea Bissau, Mozambique, and Sao Tome and Principe. Through an interdisciplinary focus that includes history, literature, intellectual thought, film, and popular music, students become acquainted with the key cultural problems related to Lusophone Africa and the various individual countries in question.

PORTUG 471. Literature in the Portuguese-Speaking World
PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in Portuguese.

This course is an advanced introduction to the study of literature written in Portuguese from Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa (more specifically Angola,Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, and Sao Tome and Principe).

PORTUG 472. Cinema in the Portuguese-Speaking World
PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers an advanced-level introduction to the film cultures of Brazil, Portugal, and Lusophone Africa (more specifically, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, and Angola).

PORTUG 473. Popular Music in the Portuguese-Speaking World
PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is an advanced introduction to the popular music of Brazil, Portugal, Cape Verde, and Angola, focusing on the emergence of contemporary popular music in a variety of forms while paying close attention to the specific historical, socio-cultural, and political forces that have shaped its formation in these specific countries.

PORTUG 499. Advanced Independent Study
Consent of instructor required. PORTUG 287 or its equivalent to prove advanced proficiency in the Portuguese language. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

The focus will be on cultural aspects of the Portuguese-speaking world that may not be covered during a given semester.

Romance Languages and Literatures (ROMLANG)
Courses in this subject cross the rubrics in French, Italian, and Spanish.
ROMLANG 250. Special Topics in Humanities
(3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

A course on special topics related to the humanities discipline. Content varies by term and instructor.

ROMLANG 251 / GTBOOKS 251. Great Books of Modern Literature
GTBOOKS 192. (3 - 4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

This course is a continuation of GTBOOKS 192 primarily for Honors sophomores. It studies books from the Renaissance to the present and focuses on the integration of the individual into larger institutions and traditions. This sequel seeks to provide students with an opportunity to become familiar with major works of world literature in relation to the Romance Languages cultural and literary traditions.

ROMLANG 400. Topics in Romance Languages and Literature
(1 - 4). May be elected twice for credit. Course may be taught in a Romance language. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Topics in Romance languages, literatures and/or cultures. Course may be taught in a Romance language. Students should read the course description for the current term to see the language in which the course is offered.

ROMLANG 498. Senior Seminar in Romance Languages and Literatures
RLL concentrators and senior standing. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Introduction to the field of Romance Studies, research methods, and guided individual research projects.

ROMLANG 499. Senior Honors Course
Consent of department required. RLL concentrators senior standing, and completion of ROMLANG 498. (3; 2 in the half-term). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Second semester of supervised independent study for the purpose of completing an honors thesis in Romance Studies.

Romance Linguistics (ROMLING)
ROMLING 298 / SPANISH 298. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 330 or ROMLING 330.

This course introduces the main concepts and methods of analysis in linguistic theory focusing on Spanish. Central to the course the concepts and techniques in the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), and sounds (phonetics-phonology). Time permitting, the course examines subfields of linguistics such as language acquisition.

ROMLING 410 / SPANISH 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology
SPANISH 298 and six credits chosen between SPANISH 279 and 399; OR SPANISH 298, two RCLANG 324 and three credits chosen between SPANISH 279 and 399. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course, offering a solid theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology, includes articulatory phonetics, acoustic phonetics, phonological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish, the consonantal system and its process, syllable, linguistic atlases, metrics origins.

ROMLING 413 / EDCURINS 455 / SPANISH 413. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics
Nine credits chosen between SPANISH 279 and 399; or two RCLANG 324 and six credits chosen between SPANISH 279 and 399. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Principles of phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analyses applied to the teaching of Spanish.

ROMLING 414 / SPANISH 414. Background of Modern Spanish
Nine credits chosen between SPANISH 279 and 399; or two RCLANG 324 and six credits chosen between SPANISH 279 and 399. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in Spanish.

A general history of the Spanish language, based on the political and cultural history of Spain. The history of the sounds and forms, word borrowings, and changes in meaning.

Spanish (SPANISH)
Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school or another college or university must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. Please note that students may not take the Spanish placement test more than one time. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level. For more information, visit the department website: www.lsa.umich.edu/rll.
SPANISH 100. Intensive Elementary Spanish
No prior instruction in Spanish language OR placement of SPANISH 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students with any prior study of Spanish must take the Placement Test. (8 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed SPANISH 101, 102, 103, 113, or RCLANG 194. This course does not meet the threshold for proficiency for the Residential College.

The first year of college Spanish equivalent to SPANISH 101 and 102 taught in one term.

SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish
No prior Spanish language or placement of SPANISH 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students with any prior study of Spanish must take the Placement Test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 100, 113, or RCLANG 194.

The first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassettes, and computer materials incorporated.

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish
SPANISH 101 with a minimum grade of C- or better. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed SPANISH 100, 103, 113, or RCLANG 194.

Continuation of SPANISH 101.

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish
Assignment of SPANISH 103 by placement test; or RCLANG 154. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Spanish must take the Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Only placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed SPANISH 100, 102, 113, or RCLANG 194.

A refresher course for students with previous training in Spanish, but not ready for a second-year course.

SPANISH 113. Accelerated Reading in Spanish
(4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed SPANISH 100, 101, 102 or 103, or RCLANG 194. Completion of SPANISH 113 does not satisfy, even partially, the LSA language requirement.

Accelerated course designed to develop reading and translation competence in Spanish.

SPANISH 230. Intensive Second-Year Spanish
SPANISH 100, 102 or 103 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 194; or assignment of SPANISH 231 by placement test. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Spanish must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8 in the half-term). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed SPANISH 113, 231, 232, or RCLANG 294 or 314. This course does not meet the threshold for proficiency for the Residential College.

The second year of college Spanish is equivalent to SPANISH 231 and 232 taught in one term.

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish
SPANISH 100, 102 or 103 with a grade of C- or higher; or RCLANG 194; or assignment of SPANISH 231 by placement test. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Spanish must take the Placement Test. Only the placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed SPANISH 113, 230, or RCLANG 294 or 314.

SPANISH 231 is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people.

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued
SPANISH 231 with a minimum grade of C- or better, or RCLANG 254; or assignment by Placement Test. College or university transfer students with any prior study of Spanish must take the Placement Test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Only placement score and not language coursework completed at a previous school will determine placement. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who are enrolled in or have completed SPANISH 113 or 230; or RCLANG 294 or 314.

Continuation of SPANISH 231. Certain sections are devoted to readings in specialized topics.

SPANISH 277. Reading, Grammar, and Composition
SPANISH 230 or 232 with a grade of C- or higher; RCLANG 294 or 314; or assignment of SPANISH 277 or SPANISH 275 by placement test. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Students who receive transfer credit for SPANISH 232 and wish to continue with their language study are strongly encouraged to take the Spanish placement exam to be certain that they are prepared for SPANISH 277. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for students who have completed SPANISH 276. SPANISH 277 is the prerequisite for a minor or major in Spanish.

This course is the new prerequisite for a minor or concentration in Spanish. It combines an introduction to the study of literature in Spanish with an advanced review of grammar.

SPANISH 278 / AMCULT 224 / LATINOAM 224. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners
Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 290. This course satisfies the prerequisite for the Spanish major or minor, but does not count toward the required courses to complete a Spanish major or minor. This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Addresses the linguistic needs of any student who has spoken Spanish at home or as part of his/her cultural heritage or upbringing. Spanish grammar, vocabulary building, reading and writing skills are developed along with discussions on bilingualism and biculturalism.

SPANISH 280. Conversation Through Spanish/Latin American Film
SPANISH 275, 276, or 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Designed to provide maximum conversation practice based on topical Spanish and/or Latin American films along with related readings.

SPANISH 283. Spanish for the Professions
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 305.

Gives advanced students a solid foundation in vocabulary, cultural concepts, and situational practice. Course objectives are to develop linguistic and cultural proficiency relevant to communication needs in services for Hispanic clients. Each section may offer different professions, but students may not repeat the course for credit with a different topic.

SPANISH 287. Advanced Composition and Style
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 310. Conducted in Spanish.

Course is intended to provide advanced knowledge of grammar and practice in writing.

SPANISH 289. Introduction to Translation
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course provides students with the necessary skills to engage in Spanish-English and English-Spanish translations with a view to gaining introductory knowledge of the field and establishing the foundation for SPANISH 415.

SPANISH 295. Introduction to Hispanic Literatures
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 320.

A genre-based introduction to the study of Spanish language narrative, poetry, drama, and essays.

SPANISH 296. Special Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit.

Through specific key topics in Hispanic literatures, this course provides a survey of major genres, authors, and texts from colonial times to the present.

SPANISH 298 / ROMLING 298. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
SPANISH 275, 276, or SPANISH 277; or SPANISH 278 (or 290) or AMCULT 224; or RCLANG 324. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (3). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to students who have completed SPANISH 330 or ROMLING 330.

This course introduces the main concepts and methods of analysis in linguistic theory focusing on Spanish. Central to the course the concepts and techniques in the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics), an