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Courses in LSA Slavic Languages & Literatures
The department teaches the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Slavic nations. The Russian language is the fifth-most spoken language in the world; in addition there are some one hundred and fifty million speakers of Czech, Polish, Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, and Ukrainian. These are vehicles of some of the world’s great cultures and are of increasing importance as a key to communication in trade and technology. Courses are offered in Slavic languages, literatures, and cultures. The undergraduate curriculum is designed primarily to provide competence in Czech, Polish, and Russian along with knowledge of Czech, Polish, and Russian literature and cultures.

Courses in English

The department offers a series of courses in English translation designed to survey the Slavic literatures and cultures for majors in Russian and Polish and for non-majors. These courses include:

  • RUSSIAN 231, 241, 322, 346, 347, 348, 357, 358, 360, 361, 365, 382, 450, 460, 461, 462, 463, 464, 472, 476, 477, 478, 479, 485;
  • SLAVIC 151, 210, 225, 240, 250, 270, 281, 290, 312, 313, 315, 316, 435, 470, 481, 487, 490;
  • POLISH 214, 215, 314, 325, 326, 432;
  • CZECH 315, 480, 483, 484

Placement Information for Introductory Language Courses

Students with high school training in Russian are required to take both the reading and listening (CEEB) Russian tests to evaluate their language proficiency. The results of the placement test determine the proper placement. The Slavic Department has final authority to determine the most appropriate course level. Heritage students (students partially raised in a Slavic-speaking environment) are required to contact the Slavic Department prior to enrolling in any language classes.

Half–Term Information

The Slavic Department offers spring and summer term intensive Russian language courses (1st-3rd year), as well as courses on Russian and East European literature, culture, and film. See the Schedule of Classes for specific information.

Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian (BCS)
BCS 131. First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

The major objective of this course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian. Students are simultaneously introduced to both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets, with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking including drill in the language laboratory.

BCS 132. First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II
BCS 131. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Continuation of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian 131. Presentation of basic grammatical information, with exercises in reading, writing, and speaking.

BCS 231. Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
BCS 132. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Emphasis is placed first on reading Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian literature and secondly on developing increased competency in speaking and writing. Extensive use of audio and video materials."

BCS 232. Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II
BCS 231. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

A survey of Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian literature from its origins to the present day with emphasis on 19th and 20th centuries. Readings are in English, but qualified candidates are expected to analyze the material in the original.

BCS 350 / JUDAIC 350 / REEES 350. Legacy of the Holocaust in Yugoslav Culture: How and Why We Need to Narrate the Holocaust
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

The course explores new texts about the Holocaust written in response to the resurrection of racist ideologies in the context of post-Communist Eastern Europe, the EU enlargement, as well as a persistent global economic and social crisis. Readings include fictional and testimonial narratives, theoretical and documentary material.

BCS 436. Modern Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature
(3). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for extensive reading of Bosnian, Croatian and/or Serbian written work at an advanced level. The subject matter covered is dependent upon preparation and interest of the individual student. Texts range from belles-lettres (short stories, novels) to journalism and history.

BCS 437. Yugoslav Literature of Exile: Nowhere People-Exiles from the State of Ideology
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The course explores cosmopolitan homelessness, ideology, memory and nostalgia in the context of the nationalist crisis and crippling wars in what used to be Yugoslavia. It covers the period from the Communist 1950s to the current moment of global migrations and exclusionist politics of identity.

BCS 439. Directed Reading of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian Literature
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Intensive reading of selected works of nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Czech (CZECH)
CZECH 141. First-Year Czech
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated by credit.

CZECH 142. First-Year Czech
CZECH 141. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Students will continue studying basics of Czech grammar according to their sequence in the Communicative Czech textbook. They practice listening, reading, speaking and writing skills while focusing on practical vocabulary for everyday situations. Students are encouraged to use language skills in one-to-one/small group activities.

CZECH 241. Second-Year Czech
CZECH 142 or 143. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

CZECH 242. Second-Year Czech
CZECH 241. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

CZECH 480. Supervised Czech Reading
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit.

CZECH 484. Modern Czech Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

The survey will cover basic literature of the 19th and 20th centuries; the more recent literary production, however, will be stressed. Reading knowledge of Czech is recommended but not required.

Polish (POLISH)
The Polish Program at the University of Michigan is considered one of the strongest, possibly the strongest, Polish programs in the country. Language courses are the core, with offerings including First, Second, Third, and Fourth Year Polish. U-M is thus the only American university to offer four levels of Polish every year. It also offers on a regular basis Polish literature survey courses, as well as courses on Polish drama, novel, film, and popular culture.
POLISH 121. First-Year Polish
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in POLISH 123. F.

Introductory course presenting basic grammatical information and vocabulary. Course is geared toward active language use through oral drills and conversational practice. Conversations and discussions include a cultural component to familiarize students with both Polish language and culture.

POLISH 122. First-Year Polish
POLISH 121. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in POLISH 123. W.

A continuation of POLISH 121, First-Year Polish aims at establishing reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. The primary focus is explaining grammar, reading, building vocabulary, and engaging in guided conversation. In addition to learning the language, students are introduced to Polish literature and culture through translation, music, and video presentations.

POLISH 214 / REEES 214. Rock Poetry and Political Protest in Poland
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to Polish history and culture through a detailed analysis of jazz, cabaret, rock, and punk music texts and performance styles and strategies. The course introduces students to rhetorical and contextual reading of verbal and non-verbal texts. It places Polish culture in the larger Central European context.

POLISH 215. Heart of Europe: Poland Today
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An introduction to contemporary Polish life in all its aspects with particular emphasis on the interaction between tradition and progress in the ongoing construction of "collective psyche." A detailed analysis of current Polish discourse on ethnic, religious, sexual and gender issues in a global context.

POLISH 221. Second-Year Polish
POLISH 122. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. F.

Reading, conversation, and composition.

POLISH 222. Second-Year Polish
POLISH 221. (4). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. W.

Reading, conversation, and composition.

POLISH 314 / SAC 314. Polish Cinema
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Course covers Polish cinema from WWII to the present, tracing the development of film styles in the context of the historical, political, and cultural features of Polish society, with focus on the use of realist norms, intricate symbolism, and absurdist allegory to critique the loss of civic values under Communism.

POLISH 321. Third-Year Polish
POLISH 222. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. F.

The course builds on the knowledge of Polish acquired during the first and second years. Equal emphasis will be laid on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Considerable attention will be given to special points of grammar and syntax. Aural comprehension will be enhanced through the use of videotaped films in the Language Laboratory.

POLISH 322. Third-Year Polish
POLISH 321. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. W.

The course builds on the knowledge of Polish acquired during the first and second years. Equal emphasis will be laid on the development of reading, writing, and speaking skills. Considerable attention will be given to special points of grammar and syntax. Aural comprehension will be enhanced through the use of videotaped films in the Language Laboratory.

POLISH 325. Polish Literature in English to 1890
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in POLISH 525.

The course surveys the development of Polish literature in terms of individual authors and major literary movements from the beginning until 1890. Individual critical analysis of texts required. A knowledge of Polish is NOT required. All readings in English translation.

POLISH 326. Polish Literature in English: 1890 to Present
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in POLISH 526.

This is a continuation of POLISH 325, although there is no prerequisite. The course covers the period from 1890 until the present. It surveys the development of Polish authors and major literary movements. Individual critical analyses of texts required. A knowledge of Polish is NOT required. All reading in English translation.

POLISH 331 / HISTORY 331. Poland in the 20th and 21st Centuries
(4; 3 in the half-term). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

The history of Poland from the restoration of independence in 1918 until the present day, including coverage of the Nazi occupation during WWII, the four decades of communism, and the path towards integration with Europe after 1989.

POLISH 421. Fourth-Year Polish I
POLISH 322. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims at developing both reading and spelling fluency by building idiomatic skills and studying culture as reflected in linguistic patterns and grammatical structures. Readings of specialized texts selected according to student's academic and professional interests.

POLISH 422. Fourth-Year Polish II
POLISH 421. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course aims at developing both reading and spelling fluency by building idiomatic skills and studying culture as reflected in linguistic patterns and grammatical structures. Readings of specialized texts selected according to student's academic and professional interests.

POLISH 450. Directed Polish Reading
Consent of instructor required. POLISH 325 and/or 326 and reading knowledge of Polish. (1 - 3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Extensive reading of Polish texts in various fields. All reading done in the Polish original.

Russian (RUSSIAN)

Intensive Language Programs

The Slavic Department and the Residential College jointly sponsor a proficiency oriented program of intensive Russian, consisting of a sequence of two eight-credit courses (RUSSIAN 103 and 203) equivalent to the regular first- and second-year program, plus a four-credit Readings Course (RCLANG 323) enabling a student to reach advanced proficiency in all four language skills in three terms. The program also includes daily Russian Language Table and weekly Russian Tea. For more information contact the RC’s main office at (734) 647-4363.

Term III Intensive Russian Language Courses

The department offers a comprehensive, proficiency-oriented intensive spring/summer Russian language program for students at the first-, second-, or third-year levels. Guest students are highly encouraged to apply. Please see www.lsa.umich.edu/sli for more information.

Note

Russian concentrators who elect RUSSIAN 462, 463, or 464 are expected to read Russian texts.
RUSSIAN 101. First-Year Russian
(5). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103/RCLANG 193 or RUSSIAN 123 or RUSSIAN 511.

The student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The class meets once a week of a lecture (grammar and culture) and four times a week for drill sections. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (alphabet and correct spelling).

RUSSIAN 102. First-Year Russian, Continued
RUSSIAN 101. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103 or 123 or 512, or RCLANG 193.

This course is a sequel to RUSSIAN 101. The class meets once a week for a lecture (grammar and culture) and four times a week for drill sessions. Students expand their vocabulary and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture.

RUSSIAN 103. Intensive First-Year Russian
(8). May not be repeated for credit. Credit is granted from only one course among RUSSIAN 103, 111, 123, or RCLANG 193. No credit is granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 102, 511, or 512.

This course covers in one term the material ordinarily covered in two terms in RUSSIAN 101 and RUSSIAN 102. The course carries 8 credit hours and is designed for highly motivated students who wish to acquire rapid mastery of Russian. Emphasis is on vocabulary building, speaking and comprehension.

RUSSIAN 123. Intensive First Year Russian
(8 in the half-term). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 102, or RUSSIAN 103/RCLANG 193 or RUSSIAN 511 or 512. Sp, Su.

Using Nachalo as the primary text, this course is intended to take the beginner to a level of basic fluency in all four language skills. This course covers Russian grammar and syntax, equips the students with a basic yet functional vocabulary, and provides practice in speaking, reading, writing and listening. The material is supplemented by videos, audio, and Internet resources.

RUSSIAN 201. Second-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 102 or RUSSIAN 103/RCLANG 193 or RUSSIAN 123. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203/RCLANG 293 or RUSSIAN 223 or 513.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered in RUSSIAN 101 and RUSSIAN 102, focusing on verbal aspect, declension and the verbs of placement.

RUSSIAN 202. Second-Year Russian, Continued
RUSSIAN 201. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (5). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203 or 223 or 514, or RCLANG 293.

This course assumes student knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and verbal adverbs.

RUSSIAN 203. Intensive Second Year Russian
RUSSIAN 102, 103, or 123 or RCLANG 193. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201, 202, 223, 513 or 514.

An intensive course meeting 8 hours a week plus language lunch table. This course covers the material which is usually covered in two terms of RUSSIAN 201 and RUSSIAN 202. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, comprehension and vocabulary building. Recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian or in Russian and East European Studies.

RUSSIAN 223. Intensive Second Year Russian
RUSSIAN 123 or 103 or 102, or RCLANG 123. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8 in the half-term). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201, 202, or RUSSIAN 203/RCLANG 293. Sp, Su.

V Puti is the primary text for this course, which will enable the student to function relatively comfortably in real-life Russian-language situations. This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered in the first-year Russian courses. It greatly emphasizes the development of speaking and listening skills.

RUSSIAN 225. Russian for Heritage Speakers I
Native or near-native speaker or permission of instructor. (3). (Lang Req). May not be repeated for credit.

Improvement of oral and written language skills of heritage speakers, emphasizing correct and diversified use of language and addressing individual grammatical difficulties. Readings from major authors and screening of film adaptations of Russian literature. Discussion of various cultural topics. This course can be used to satisfy the LSA language requirement.

RUSSIAN 301. Third-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 202, 203, 223, 225, or RCLANG 293. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) Satisfactory scores on a proficiency test. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 303, 325, or 515. F.

A course designed to provide concentrated training in the speaking, aural comprehension and writing of the Russian language.

RUSSIAN 302. Third-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 301 or RCLANG 323. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 303, 325, or 516.

A course designed to provide concentrated training in the speaking, aural comprehension and writing of the Russian language.

RUSSIAN 303. Third-Year Intensive Russian
RUSSIAN 202, 203, 223 or RCLANG 293. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (8). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 301, 302, 325, 515, or 516. S.

This course is the intensive variant of RUSSIAN 301 and 302 that provides a concentrated review of grammar, introductory readings in Russian culture and literature, and regular practice in conversation.

RUSSIAN 322. Russia Today
(4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

An examination of how Russian society defines itself through many forms of cultural production. An exploration of the problematic uses and meaning of the word "culture".

RUSSIAN 325. Russian for Heritage Speakers II
Successful completion of RUSSIAN 225 or permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 301, 302, 303, 515, or 516.

This course is designed for students who have completed RUSSIAN 225 or heritage speakers who have basic reading and writing skills. It focuses on professional usage of Russian and is aimed towards an advanced level of language proficiency. Students work on improving their skills in creative writing, reading, and grammar. Topics include Russian history, education, relationships in Russian society, business, and Russian media. Students who complete this course successfully may advance to fourth-year Russian and/or courses in literature and area studies.

RUSSIAN 346. Russian Literature from Romanticism to Realism
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to major masterpieces of 19th century Russian fiction that covers major intellectual and literary developments. The course discusses a broad range of religious, social, and moral issues raised by Russian writers. It also traces the evolution of Russian narrative traditions, emphasizing the formative role of ideas in Russian literature. Taught in English.

RUSSIAN 347 / RCHUMS 347. Survey of Russian Literature
A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Russian Literature of the 19th century to c. 1870 with emphasis on Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Goncharov, Turgenev Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy.

RUSSIAN 348 / RCHUMS 348. Survey of Russian Literature
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Russian Literature from c. 1870 to 1905, with emphasis on Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Leskov, Bunin, Kuprin, Chekhov, and Gorky.

RUSSIAN 358. Central Asia through Russian Eyes: Cultural Appropriation of an Exotic Land
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 558. Taught in English.

This course explores key representations of Central Asia in Russian culture from the 19th-21st centuries. It highlights the following topics: how Russia's conquest of Central Asia contributed the Russians' quest for national identity; how their perceptions of the region have evolved; and how they positioned themselves in regard to values associated with Muslim culture. Taught in English.

RUSSIAN 361. Russian Modernism: Decadence, Symbolism, and the Avant-garde in Russia
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course offers a detailed introduction to the art and thought of Russian modernism (1890-1921). It covers the colorful phenomenon of decadence and its literary and ideological manifestations, from symbolism and "the new religious consciousness" to the avant-garde and an overcoming of the decadent mood in the post-symbolist poetics.

RUSSIAN 401. Fourth-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 302 or 303. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403 or 517. F.

RUSSIAN 401/RUSSIAN 402 are designed to provide an active mastery of the more difficult facets of Russian grammar, especially the verbal system. Assignments include Russian short stories, compositions, and oral reports.

RUSSIAN 402. Fourth-Year Russian
RUSSIAN 401. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403 or 518. W.

RUSSIAN 401/RUSSIAN 402 are designed to provide an active mastery of the more difficult facets of Russian grammar, especially the verbal system. Assignments include Russian short stories, compositions, and oral reports.

RUSSIAN 430. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature
Consent of instructor required. Permission of Department Chair. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit.

RUSSIAN 435 / HISTORY 435 / JUDAIC 435. Cultural History of Russian Jews through Literature and the Arts
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Course surveys major trends of cultural development of Jews in Russia from late 18th to early 21st centuries, focusing on literary and artistic creativity in Russian cultural context. Special attention is given to two major centers in Odessa and St. Petersburg treated as two different models of Jewish cultural life.

RUSSIAN 461. Pushkin
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

This lecture course provides an overview of the greatest Russian writer's poetry, drama, and prose as a structural unity. Undergraduates may do all of their reading in translation. Knowledge of Russian not required.

RUSSIAN 462. Dostoevsky
(3). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. Russian concentrators are expected to read Russian texts.

RUSSIAN 463. Chekhov
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. All readings may be done in English. Russian concentrators are expected to read Russian texts.

RUSSIAN 464. Tolstoy
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English. No prior knowledge of Russian literature and culture is necessary. Russian concentrators are expected to read Russian texts.

RUSSIAN 469. 20th-Century Authors
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Taught in English.

A detailed examination of the careers and works of one or two major authors of the twentieth century.

RUSSIAN 471. Modern Russian Poetry
A knowledge of Russian is required. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

RUSSIAN 474. Late 20th-Century Russian Literature
(3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A survey of Russian literature in the last decades of the twentieth century.

RUSSIAN 477. Russian Culture and National Ideology
Permission of instructor. (3). May not be repeated for credit.

This course examines the development of national ideology in 19th century Russia as a central problem of Russian culture of this period. Official nationalism as well as popular national ideology will be discussed in their metaphoric representation, as will their deep connection with Russian literature, which provided society with some of its most popular cultural myths.

RUSSIAN 479. Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years
Knowledge of Russian is not a prerequisite (all readings in English). (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

A survey of Nabokov's English novels, short stories, plays, and poetry, considered in the context of world literature with special attention to cross-cultural poetics of literary multilingualism.

RUSSIAN 491. Senior Honors Course
Consent of instructor required. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of RUSSIAN 491 and 492. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of RUSSIAN 492, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

As the first in a two-term Honors sequence, Honors students work in consultation with the Honors advisor and thesis supervisor, and conduct research in an area of literary or linguistic studies. By the end of the term students should have completed a detailed bibliography and prospectus for a thesis. Regular meetings with the advisor are expected.

RUSSIAN 492. Senior Honors Course
Consent of instructor required. Approval of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of RUSSIAN 491 and 492.

RUSSIAN 499. Advanced Seminar in Russian
RUSSIAN 302 or 303, and 351. (3). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in Russian.

This seminar serves as the capstone course for the concentration in Russian, but the course is open to other qualified undergraduates and to graduate students. Topics on Russian literature and/or culture vary. Readings, discussions, written and oral assignments in Russian.

RUSSIAN 552. Russian Literature of the Eighteenth Century
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Slavic Languages and Literatures (SLAVIC)
SLAVIC 150. First Year Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

The course will serve as the Freshman Seminar for the Slavic Department. It will have several sections, each serving as an introduction to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia. Each section will be subtitled and its description will address the cultural features to be analyzed and discussed (i.e., diversity, history, ethnicity, religions, languages, art, etc.)

SLAVIC 151. First Year Seminar
Enrollment restricted to first-year students, including those with sophomore standing. (4). (FYWR). May not be repeated for credit.

The course will serve as the Depts. 4 credit Freshmen Seminar. It will have multiple sections, as needed, each serving as an introduction to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia, and Eurasia. Each section will be subtitled and its description will address the cultural features to be analyzed and discussed (i.e., diversity, history, ethnicity, religions, languages, customs, etc.)

SLAVIC 225. Arts and Cultures of Central Europe
(3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

SLAVIC 240. Introduction to Slavic Folklore
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the folklore of Slavs, the largest population of Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans. Primary emphasis on oral traditional verse and prose (epic, ballad, lyric, folktale), plus folk art and architecture, music, dance, cooking, customs, and ritual.

SLAVIC 260. Directed Reading in Slavic Studies
Consent of instructor required. (1 - 4). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for extensive reading and research in Slavic studies. The subject covered is dependent upon the preparation and interest of the individual student.

SLAVIC 270 / JUDAIC 271. Contact and Conflict: Jewish Experience in Eastern Europe through Art, Film and Literature
(3). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

The class surveys Jewish experience in Central and Eastern Europe, primarily in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on contact and coexistence in the multiethnic environments characteristic of the area. This experience will mainly be studied through literature and film, making the course primarily an investigation of cultural history.

SLAVIC 281 / HJCS 281 / JUDAIC 281. Jews in the Modern World: Texts, Images, Ideas
(4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

In this course we examine the multiple ways in which Jews in Europe, America, Israel, and the Middle East have responded to the cultural, political, economic, and social forces of modernity. By focusing on a variety of textual and visual material from the late 18th century to the present (including literary texts, fine arts, film, architecture), students have an opportunity to explore the processes by which Jewish culture has been shaped and reshaped in the face of unprecedented new freedoms and persecutions.

SLAVIC 290. Studies in Eastern European Cultures
(1 in the half-term). (HU). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Slavic Minicourses are intended to introduce a specific area of Slavic studies to a general student audience. Basic concepts and analytical techniques are introduced, and the students gain significant knowledge of a clearly-defined topic.

SLAVIC 312 / RCHUMS 312. Central European Cinema
A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Taught in English.

SLAVIC 313 / RCHUMS 313 / SAC 313. Russian and Ukrainian Cinema
(3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. F.

The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors. All films are viewed, analyzed, and discussed with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

SLAVIC 315. Field Work
Consent of instructor required. Native proficiency or course in Russian, Polish, Czech or Ukrainian language, literature, culture, or history. (1 - 3). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Independent study for field work either locally or abroad.

SLAVIC 316 / RCLANG 333. RUSLAN Service Learning: Russian Language, Culture, and People in the U.S.
Native proficiency or one course in Russian language, literature, culture, or history. (3). (R&E). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

This course is for all learners of Russian language, history , and culture who want to apply and improve their newly acquired language skills and area-studies knowledge by directly and personally engaging with the local Russophone community. The on-campus element uses extensive readings, films, and discussion to explore the history, nature, and features of Russian immigration in the U.S. Students work on the job skills necessary in performing project services effectively and beneficially: how to develop reflection skill; and how to analyze and debate the issues in service situations. The course integrates service assignments with a comprehensive understanding of the social, cultural, and linguistic issues typically encountered.

SLAVIC 395 / HISTORY 332 / POLSCI 395 / REEES 395 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
(4; 3 in the half-term). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor. F.

SLAVIC 396 / HISTORY 333 / POLSCI 396 / REEES 396 / SOC 393. Survey of Central and Eastern Europe and the Enlarged European Union
(3 - 4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be counted in a Slavic Department academic minor.

An interdisciplinary survey of the people, history, politics, government, economy, social institutions, literature, and arts of the communist and post-communist states of Central and Eastern Europe and their relations with the rest of the world, especially with regard to the European Union.

SLAVIC 410. Teaching of Slavic Languages
RUSSIAN 302 or 303. (Prerequisites enforced at registration.) (2). May not be repeated for credit.

An exploration of the multiple aspects of language teaching, including theoretical background. Topics of discussion include intercultural understanding, drilling, testing, computer-assisted instruction, and multimedia technology. Emphasis on development of practical skills for classroom instruction.

SLAVIC 450. Directed Readings in Slavic Studies
(1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit.

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for extensive reading and research in Slavic studies. The subject covered is dependent upon the preparation and interest of the individual student.

SLAVIC 470. Topics in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe
(3). May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits.

Survey and analysis of selected topics in the literature, arts, and related areas of the cultures of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe.

SLAVIC 471. Seminar in Cultural Studies of Central, Eastern and Southern Europe
(3). May be elected twice for credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Seminar covering various topics in cultural studies of Central, Eastern, and Southern Europe. This course that will present cultural theory or specific cultural material (from folklore or popular culture to literature and cinema), with topics and instructors varying from year to year.

SLAVIC 490. Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe
(1). May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Survey and analysis of current developments in Eastern European literatures, politics, and culture in light of the changes now taking place.

Ukrainian (UKR)
UKR 151. First-Year Ukrainian
(4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in UKR 103.

Fundamentals of Ukrainian grammar, reading, writing, and oral drills.

UKR 152. First-Year Ukrainian
UKR 151. (4). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in UKR 103.

Fundamentals of Ukrainian grammar, reading, writing, and oral drills.

UKR 320. An Introduction to Ukrainian Poetry
Basic Ukrainian reading knowledge. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Course covers the history of Ukrainian poetry in the first half of the 20th century, ranging from neoclassicism to panfuturism, within the context of the development of Ukrainian literature and national identity, with particular emphasis on 20th century high modernism. Poetry will be read in the original Ukrainian. The basic principles of Ukrainian versification and its evolution will be applied in explicating and translating the poetry into English. The course will thus further students? knowledge of the language itself as well as of Ukrainian culture. Poets to be read include Shevchenko ("To the Living, Dead, and Unborn Compatriots of Mine, My Friendly Epistle"), Antonych, Bazhan, Drai-Khmara, Fylypovych, Pluzhnyk, Ryl?s'kyi, Semenko, Tychyna, and Zerov.

UKR 421. Directed Reading in Ukrainian Literature
Consent of instructor required. Open to non-concentrators. A knowledge of Ukrainian is not required. (1 - 4). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

Readings of works by major Ukrainian authors. Program can deal with either the old or the modern period and includes weekly one-hour discussion meetings and several short papers. Reading can be done in Ukrainian or English.

UKR 450. Internship in Ukraine
Consent of instructor required. UKR 152. (1 in the half-term). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Rackham credit requires additional work.

Students will participate in internships involving the extensive use of Ukrainian language. Students will take the initiative to locate and plan the internships under the sponsorship of a faculty member. Some of the internships may be arranged by nonprofit organizations.

UKR 470. Cultures of Ukraine
(3). May not be repeated for credit.

Students will learn about the diverse cultural traditions of the second largest country in Europe with more than a 1000-year-old history of colonial heritage. The course will examine major components of Ukraine culture: history, language, literature, religion, science, music, and art. Topics are presented as "cultural mapping" of Ukrainian lands and its people, who were widely influenced by a variety of other cultures, yet never lost their own identity.

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